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Body found near path in Marumsco Acre Lake Park

From Prince William police: 

Death Investigation – On July 13 at 6:47AM, officers responded to investigate a body that was located in the 14400 block of Melbourne Ave in Woodbridge (22191). A citizen called police after discovering the body while walking along a path in Marumsco Acre Lake Park. The body, an adult male, was transported to the Medical Examiner’s Office in Manassas for an autopsy and further analysis to determine the cause of death. The victim’s identity will be release once next-of-kin has been notified. At this time, there is no public threat or need for concern. More information will be released when available. The investigation continues.

Woodbridge Army vet gets free home roof replacement

An Army veteran who lives in the 13000 block of Bottner Court in Woodbridge, just off Horner Road, had her roof replaced for free on Friday, July 13, 2018.

From an email: 

Owens Corning Platinum Contractors are working with Purple Heart Homes to provide new roofs to veterans in need and their families as part of the Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project.

Blanca Davila-Pabon, who served as a staff sergeant in the Army, will receive a new roof on Friday, July 13, from Dreamhome Remodeling Inc., an Owens Corning Roofing Platinum Contractor. This nationwide effort is a way to show gratitude and honor the veterans who served our country and the families who support them.

Owens Corning Roofing and its network of independent Platinum Contractors, along with support from the Owens Corning Foundation, are donating roofing materials and labor to replace roofing shingles on the homes of military veterans and their families throughout the country. Through a partnership with Purple Heart Homes, Blanca Davila-Pabon was selected and approved as the recipient for the roof replacement.

Drastic 2017 crime stat swings: Rapes increase while murder rate plunges

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‘The Virginia economy has truly started to perform again’

Last week, Governor Ralph Northam announced that Virginia finished the fiscal year with  $551.9 million more in revenue that we projected when writing this year’s budget.

First, the good news is that most of this surplus is due to increased tax revenue from payroll withholding taxes, not one-time revenue sources like capital gains or tax avoidance strategies related to the recent changes in federal tax laws.  The Virginia economy has truly started to perform again.

However, it is important to keep these numbers in context.  The state’s General Fund has been under significant stress over the decade since the Great Recession and automatic federal spending cuts caused by a process called a “sequester.”  In the nine years, I have served in the General Assembly, this is the second fiscal year that the Commonwealth has experienced revenue growth equal to or greater than the historical average.

Because of our state Constitution, other state laws and the budget, all of these  “new” funds are already allocated.  Our laws require that 10 percent or $55 million go to the Water Quality Improvement Fund and that the $500 million balance be contributed to Virginia’s Revenue Stabilization (“Rainy Day”) Fund, which before the 2018 General Assembly session had dropped to historically low levels due to frequent, sluggish revenues.  Bond rating agencies had also expressed concern about the lower balances and had indicated that our AAA bond rating could be adversely impacted without significant contributions.

While everyone would love to have a tax cut, the General Assembly has enacted dozens of tax cuts over the past two decades, including car tax relief, estate tax repeal and removing the sales tax on food.  These tax cuts have completely offset the effect of any tax increases that passed.  As a result, most General Fund programs have been starved.   

Here are some examples.

Virginia’s per pupil, elementary-secondary education expenditures are the 15th lowest in the nation and our teacher salaries are the 13th lowest.  Virginia’s meager state-funded preschool program is still in its infancy. 

Virginia theoretically set a goal for the state to support 66 percent of the cost of attending college, funding that actually existed when I attended James Madison University from  1989 to 1993.  The state now only covers about 33 percent of the cost.  This has caused tuition at our state-supported institutions to skyrocket so that tuition rates at these colleges have become the fourth highest in the United States of America.

There are 10,000 families on Virginia’s waiting list for Medicaid waivers.  These are families with fully disabled juvenile and adult children who are incapable of living independently.  A Medicaid “waiver” allows them to live at home or in group homes funded by the Commonwealth.  Many families, such as military families, move to Virginia only to learn that our state is not supporting these services, services that are basic in most states.

State employee salaries continue to lag behind the private sector.  Recent reports have concluded that state employees would need a 26 percent pay increase to reach private sector parity.  State attorneys’ salaries are 90 percent lower than comparable private sector salaries.  Until this year, the Virginia State Police had not had any new trooper positions authorized in over a decade. 

Environmental enforcement in Virginia is severely limited by inadequate staffing.  Former Governor George Allen cut employees by 20 percent during his term and the Department of Environmental Quality has never recovered.  We struggled to find funds this year to pay for actual staff at the newly-created Widewater State Park in the 36th District.  The state has been sitting on the 1,000 acres for 30 years but has not had the money to open the park.   

Transportation is funded entirely separately by completely different streams of taxes mainly related to transportation such as gas taxes, annual fees and sales taxes on vehicles.  We were only able to restart maintaining our roads and investing in new transportation projects after we increased taxes in the 2013 General Assembly session. 

At the end of the day, the new funds are good news, but there are dozens of state-funded programs which are desperate for fresh funding. Please continue to provide your feedback as to how we should prioritize spending if we are fortunate enough for revenue to continue increasing.  You can reach me at scott@scottsurovell.org.

It is an honor to serve as your state senator.  

Old Harbor Drive commuter lot could become a park

Occoquan District Supervisor, Ruth Anderson, is aiming to increase the green space area within the district as it has the least amount of green park space, per acre, of all the districts in Prince William County.

The unused commuter lot at the corner of Harbor Drive and Minnieville Road looked like the perfect start to accumulate more park space. Supervisor Anderson devised a team with Prince William Parks and Recreation, The Green Scheme (a non-profit out of Washington, D.C.), and Keep Prince William Beautiful (a local PWC non-profit) to make this a reality.

Prince William Parks and Recreation is instrumental in the planning process for this park, ensuring more green space in the county for the residents to enjoy. The Green Scheme was contracted to design the garden and park space.

Keep Prince William Beautiful is conducting community outreach and data collection for the town halls and community surveys. In order to move forward with the project, Supervisor Anderson is hosting two town halls on Thursday, July 12, and Thursday, July 19, both from 7-9:00 pm at Lake Ridge Baptist Church, to share information about the project and ask for input from the residents in her district.

We encourage those in the surrounding areas to attend and share their wants and ideas, but all residents are welcome to join! The collaborative effort of these community partners, along with input from the community, will drive this project forward so there is another park for all to enjoy.

Helping first-time homebuyers navigate a tight market: 3 key steps from The Fauquier Bank

When it comes to purchasing a home, Mary Ann Andrews of The Fauquier Bank recommends buyers come in for a personal consultation, especially those who’ve never previously been through the complex process.

Buying a home can be daunting, between learning the lingo and understanding the financing. And given the current market conditions and limited housing inventory — which has sparked multiple offers and price bidding — it’s essential to know what you’re doing.

That’s where Andrews comes in.

“There’s so much you need to know,” says Andrews, NMLS # 482462, a TFB vice president and mortgage originator. “I like to sit down and explain how the process works.”

With first-time buyers, she adds, “I go over everything, just to get them comfortable with the language and the process.”

For tech-savvy potential buyers, it may seem tempting to do things online. But Andrews says there’s no substitute for meeting face-to-face.

“You can understand their needs,” she explains. “You can give them so much more information and discuss so many more options.”

Andrews can meet potential buyers at any of TFB’s 11 branches in Fauquier and Prince William counties.

For first-time buyers, Andrews follows a specific process. First things first: do your homework.

“Do your research and check out the area where you’re looking,” she advises. “You need to get with a realtor. And you need to find out what the taxes are and find out what the HOA fees are.” 

First-time buyers should follow these three key steps:

1. Prepare Financially: Begin by checking your credit score, saving for a down payment and figuring out how much you can afford to spend. Then meet with a mortgage originator to get pre-approved.

2. Understand Mortgages: Evaluate the different types of mortgage loans that are available and which works best for your situation.

3. Start Shopping: Look for a house that fits your needs and budget, then put in an offer. Gather the necessary documents for the loan processing and closing process.

NMLS #462668

Join us for a First-Time Homebuyer Seminar at 6 p.m. on Aug. 1 at BadWolf Brewing Company, 9776 Center St. in Manassas. Our mortgage originators will be available to answer questions. RSVP at 540-349-0202.

Trailers, trash truck burn on Featherstone Road

WOODBRIDGE — It wasn’t quite a dumpster fire, but burning garbage was a hot problem Thursday.

Fire and rescue crews were called to a moving an storage firm at 1250 Featherstone Road in Woodbridge at 11:34 a.m.

A garbage truck caught fire and flames extended to two nearby tractor trailers, said Battalion Chief Jason Reese. 

No one was injured.

The trailers contained cardboard boxes. It’s unclear what was on the garbage truck. 

The fire is under investigation.

By 1 o’clock, Prince William County fire and rescue crews had the blaze well under control. Fire crews were seen drinking water to stay hydrated in temperatures that hovered in the mid-80s.

 

 

 

Man injured at construction site flown to hospital

MANASSAS — One man is hurt this afternoon after a construction accident just outside Manassas.

The unidentified victim was flown to Inova Fairfax Hospital about 1:40 p.m. The victim was placed in a helicopter that landed at Bennett Elementary School, near where the accident occurred.

Rescue crews were called to Haversack Hunt Way and Caledonia Meadow Drive at 12:55 p.m. for a report of an injury, said Prince William County Fire and Rescue spokesman Matt Smolsky.

Smolsky did not have details about the crash or the extent of the injuries of the victim.

 

 

 

Updated: Girl, 15, missing from Woodbridge home

From Prince William police: 

*MISSING ENDANGERED JUVENILE: The Prince William County Police Department is asking for the public’s help in locating a missing and endangered juvenile, Ana Maria HERNANDEZ-RODRIGUEZ.

The investigation revealed Ana Maria was last seen at her residence on Stafford Street in the Woodbridge area of Prince William County at approximately 1:18PM on July 5. Ana Maria is believed to be missing under circumstances that indicate her physical safety may be in jeopardy, which qualifies her as being endangered.

Anyone with information regarding the whereabouts of this juvenile is asked to contact Prince William County police at 703-792-6500 or your local police department.

Ana Maria HERNANDEZ-RODRIGUEZ is described as a white female, 15 years of age, 5’3”, 100 lbs with black hair and brown eyes. Last seen wearing a white shirt and black capri pants.

Updated July 15, 2018

From Prince William police: 

*UPDATE: Ana Maria HERNANDEZ-RODRIGUEZ, who was reported as missing and endangered, has been located and is safe

Enlarged prostate happens to every guy. There’s a new way to treat it at Sentara.

It’s one of the most common health issues for men as they grow older.

“As gentlemen age, the testosterone that’s in their body fuels the growth of their prostate so every guy that has testosterone and a prostate, it will eventually get larger. It happens in different rates in different people, but happens,” explains John B. Klein, M.D. of Potomac Urology.   

Even though it may not be commonly discussed, every day Dr. Klein sees patients suffering from an enlarged prostate, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH.)

Symptoms include frequent urination, difficulty starting and stopping urination, inability to completely empty the bladder and frequent trips to the bathroom in the middle of the night. 

“Urinary symptoms do not necessarily indicate prostate cancer, a majority of the time they’re from benign enlargement of the prostate. However, you can have prostate cancer and benign enlargement of the prostate –so it’s important to evaluate for both concurrently,” explains Dr. Klein.

Once the prostate screening comes back negative, there are a number of options to treat an enlarged prostate, everything from daily medications and in-office procedures to outpatient surgeries.

Dr. Klein was recently recognized as a Rezum Center of Excellence for his expertise in treating BPH. While pills to treat BPH have been around for years, Dr. Klein finds many of his patients discontinue taking those medicines because of side effects like dizziness and adverse effects to sexual function.

Rezum® is one of the minimally invasive procedures offered in office and takes just minutes to perform using steam to decrease the prostate. Laser enucleation of the prostate is another option.

Dr. Klein says this outpatient procedure has been offered at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center for the last 11 months and is ideal for patients with moderate and larger prostates. The newest option Sentara Northern Virginia is offering BPH patients is Aquablation, a surgery using water to resect the prostate.

The developments are exciting for Dr. Klein who looks forward to sharing the news with the community.

“This is one of the only centers in Northern Virginia that performs all three of these treatments options. It basically gives people a one-stop shop for their treatment, no matter size and shape of their prostate.”

Favored Route 28 bypass route cuts through portion of Bull Run Regional Park

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City leaders sign letter of intent to move P-Nats to Fredericksburg

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Volunteers needed for the Christmas in July event on Saturday, July 21

Good Morning Prince William – Volunteers needed for the Christmas in July event on Saturday, July 21st.  This event is sponsored by The Philadelphia Tavern, Sinistral Brewing and Volunteer Prince William to benefit The Un-Tim-A-Tree Holiday Gift program for needy kids. Duties include selling drink tickets and checking IDs.  3 shifts available- 12noon-3pm, 3pm-6pm and 6-pm-9pm.  This is a fun, family event on Main Street, Old Town Manassas with raffles, giveaways, games, food, drinks and Santa!  Please sign up to help at mfoley@volunteerprincewilliam.org.  This promises to be great fun!

Prince William Soil & Water Conservation is having their next water quality monitoring event on Thursday July 12th at Evergreen Acres in Nokesville, 9:30-noon. Come learn about the health of local streams and how they interact with land uses.  Please call Veronica at (571) 379-7514 for more info.

ACTS needs volunteers to remove the flower beds in front of the thrift store on Tuesday and Thursday mornings starting July 10th. Please email Tamika for more info at: tmartin@actspec.org.

RSVP – The retired and Senior Volunteer Program is looking for volunteer’s age 55+ to deliver noon meals through the Meals on Wheels Program. Shrifts are just 2-3 hours and available in throughout the greater area.  RSVP members receive a mileage reimbursement and additional insurance coverage at no cost to the volunteer.  Please call Jan at (571) 292-5307 to learn more.

CASA Children’s Intervention Services needs volunteer advocates to help protect abused and neglected children in our community. You’ll receive fantastic training to give you all the skills needed to help these kids.  Please email Suzanne at: smitchell@casacis.org to learn more about the program and register for the next orientation session.

PW Conservation Alliance has several fun workdays coming up.  Please join them on the workdays of   July 20 and August 4th at Merrimac Farm, 9am-12noon.  It feels good to get your hands dirty.  Please RSVP for these events at (703) 490-5200 or via email at: alliance@pwconserve.org.

Care Net PRCs is looking for bilingual volunteers to help in their office in Manassas.  They are also having a movie event on July 14th, 7pm at Manassas Baptist Church. Come see the inspiring movie – I can Only Imagine.  Please email Kirk at crc@carenetprcs.org for more info.

K9s Serving Vets in Triangle, Virginia supports the process of partnering the vet with a service dog.  They assist from start to finish that will in the end change the veteran’s life.  Please consider donating to them on line at: k9sservingvets.org.

The PW Crime Prevention Council is looking for new volunteer members to promote safe communities.  The Council meeting the 2nd. Monday of the month at 7:30pm at 1 County Complex. Please register on the website at: pwcpc.org.

Virginia Cooperative Extension needs volunteers to lead financial seminars in Manassas and/or Woodbridge area.  Please email Victoria for more specifics at: smartmoney@pwcgov.org.

Mark your calendars for Saturday August 25th for the 3rd Annual Farm to Table event to support the Prince William Environmental Excellence Foundation at Windy Knoll Farm. The event runs from 3-8pm with 2 seating’s for dinner.  Tickets are just $40 for adults, $20 for children 13-18 and free for kids under 12.  There will be local vendors, artisan and farm sponsors and antique equipment.  It promises to fun for the entire family.  You can buy tickets on line at: princewilliamfarm2table2018.eventbrite.com.

The Manassas Senior Center is looking for a volunteer to teach crafts to the members of the center each week.  Come share your love of knitting, crocheting, painting, ceramics and such with others. Please call Jan at (571) 292-5307 for more info.  They also would love a volunteer to teach Sign Language class as well.  It’s a great way to share your skill. Please call Sue at 703-792-7154 to learn more.

Youth for Tomorrow is looking for volunteers to share hobbies and interests with the kids on weekends. If you have a little time please bring your interest to share with them such as sewing, gardening, cooking, golf, arts & crafts, jewelry to name just a few.  Please fill out the volunteer application with your resume at: youthfortomorrow.org.

The Greater Prince William Medical Reserve Corps needs both medical and non-medical volunteers to join their ranks.  These volunteers are trained to respond to public health emergencies as well as day to day health department activities.  They offer tons of training topics to build your skillset.  Please call Isabella at (703) 792-7341 to learn more.

If you are looking for other opportunities, please don’t forget to call my wonderful team at Volunteer Prince William. Jan can help you with the Retired and Senior Volunteer (RSVP) opportunities at (703) 369-5292 ext. 1, Shelley can help with any individual or group projects and send you weekly updates if you’d like. Shelley is at (703) 369-5292 ext. 2, and Bonnie can help you with opportunities available in Disaster Preparedness at (703) 369-5292 ext. 3. Please visit our website at www.volunteerprincewilliam.org. Thanks so much for all you do in our community.

Call to Action is a column written by Volunteer Prince William Executive Director Mary Foley.

Police subdue Quantico woman they say brandished a knife

From Prince William police: 

Stabbing Investigation | Assault & Battery on a Law Enforcement Officer [LEO]  On July 9 at 9:47AM, officers responded to a residence located in the 230 block of 4th Ave in the Town of Quantico (22134) to investigate a possible domestic involving a knife.
 
A third party caller reported to police that an unknown woman was seen holding a knife and threatening a man as they were standing on a balcony of the residence. Officers arrived and confronted the woman who was still holding the knife and threatening the man.
 
When officers challenged the woman, she ignored officers’ commands and went back into the residence. The woman eventually came to the door without the knife and refused to cooperate with officers. When officers attempted to detain the accused, she resisted.
 
Officers deployed pepper spray and, after a brief struggle, the accused was detained without further incident. Upon further investigation, officers determined that the victim, a 61-year-old man, and the accused, an acquaintance, were both intoxicated and became involved in a verbal altercation while standing on the balcony.
 
During the encounter, the accused retrieved a knife and stabbed the victim in the hand before officers arrived. Minor injuries were reported. Following the investigation, the accused was charged.
 
Arrested on July 9:

Jennifer HENRY, 45, of 15238 Wentwood Ln in Woodbridge
Charged with aggravated malicious woundingassault & battery on a LEOintoxicated in public, and obstruction of justice
Court Date: July 24, 2018 | Bond: Held WITHOUT bond

Police search for suspect in armed 7-Eleven robbery

From Prince William police: 

Armed Robbery – On July 8 at 11:11AM, officers responded to the 7-Eleven located at 7301 Sudley Rd in Manassas (20109) to investigate a robbery. The employee reported to police that a male wearing a mask entered the store and brandished a handgun toward the employee. The suspect then forced the employee to open the cash register to obtain money before fleeing the business on foot. No injuries were reported.
 
A Prince William County police K-9 and helicopter from Fairfax County Police searched for the suspect who was not located. The investigation continues.    
Suspect Description:

A light skinned male, between 19 & 25 years of age, 5’06”, 150lbs, with a thin build
Last seen wearing a facemask, black long sleeve sweater, khaki pants, and black tennis shoes. The suspect was also carrying a red, soft ice cooler

It cost nearly half a million to build, and it’s the part of Jiffy Lube Live you never want to see

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‘Pamphlets depicting hate propaganda’ found on Carver Road

GAINESVILLE — Police on Sunday found pamphlets filled with hate speech strewn across Carver Road in Gainesville.

The neighborhood in Prince William County is well known for being one of the first places freed black slaves settled after the Civil War.

Police officers were called to the area at 8:28 a.m.

Prince William police tell us:

“…several suspicious pamphlets depicting hate propaganda found at the ends of multiple driveways in the Gainesville and Bristow areas.

A caller reported to police that they had located a bag that contained birdseed and pamphlets that appeared to be recruiting material for the Ku Klux Klan.

The bags were seemingly thrown at random on driveways sometime during the overnight hours of July 7 into July 8 in the Gainesville area along several residential streets off of Lee Hwy between Carver Rd and Old Carolina Rd.

Similar bags were also located in the Bristow Village neighborhood in the Bristow area. The birdseed appeared to have been used to weigh the bags down, possibly in an attempt to throw the bags from a vehicle.

No suspicious persons or vehicles were reported in the area around this time.

The pamphlets did not contain any threats and did not appear to target anyone specific in the neighborhood.

No property damage was reported. A similar incident occurred on April 28 in the 4500 block of Forestburg Ln in Triangle. The investigation continues. 

Carver Road is a narrow, rural route in Gaienesville connecting Route 29 to Old Carolina Road.

Nicholas Soller of Gainesville named to the University of New Hampshire’s Dean’s List

From an email: 

Nicholas Soller of Gainesville has been named to the Dean’s List at the University of New Hampshire for earning Honors for the spring 2018 semester. Soller is majoring in Undeclared.

Students named to the Dean’s List at the University of New Hampshire are students who have earned recognition through their superior scholastic performance during a semester enrolled in a full-time course load (12 or more graded credits). Highest honors are awarded to students who earn a semester grade point average of 3.85 or better out of a possible 4.0. Students with a 3.65 to 3.84 average are awarded high honors and students whose grade point average is 3.5 through 3.64 are awarded honors.

The University of New Hampshire is a flagship research university that inspires innovation and transforms lives in our state, nation and world. More than 16,000 students from all 50 states and 71 countries engage with an award-winning faculty in top ranked programs in business, engineering, law, liberal arts and the sciences across more than 200 programs of study. UNH’s research portfolio includes partnerships with NASA, NOAA, NSF and NIH, receiving more than $100 million in competitive external funding every year to further explore and define the frontiers of land, sea and space.

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