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Chick-fil-A is #1 again. How they do it in Bristow.

Chick-fil-A ranks as the number one restaurant on the American Consumer Satisfaction Index released this month. 

It’s the second year the fast-food restaurant won the top spot, beating out competitors Panera Bread, Subway, and Arbys, respectively. 

It’s good news for Chick-fill-A at Bristow owner Mike Lovitt, who says the place known for its chicken sandwiches aims to convert guests into raving fans of Chick-fil-A. 

It starts with clean restaurants, and greeting customers with a smile and an enthusiastic greeting “Welcome to Chick-fil-A!” and “How may we serve you?” when they approach the front counter.

“And, the food’s gotta taste good,” said Lovitt. 

But excellent service also means always being vigilant, says the retired U.S. Army Colonel.

“We must consistently treat our guests to a clean restaurant, fast service, attentive and courteous team members, and good tasty food. Our team members execute “second-mile” mile service which goes above and beyond what is expected by our guests to strive for the “Wow” factor.” In our restaurant, we also go to great lengths to treat everyone with honor, dignity, and respect”.

The top nod also goes to a restaurant adheres to the principle of closing on Sunday on Sundays to allow its employees to spend time with family and friends. 

And unlike other fast food franchises, it’s uncommon to see owners with multiple Chick-fil-A stores. That allows owners to focus on guests, service, and food quality. 

And when it comes to finding the right owners for restaurants, “Chick-fil-A has a long, detailed interview process and is looking for people with good character,” he added.  

Chick-fil-A at Bristow is located at 9939 Sowder Village Square just outside Manassas. They’re open Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to  10 p.m., and Saturdays 6:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Public transit is still underutilized. So, how could OmniRide grow by becoming innovative?

This summary of the Masabi Research report from April 2018 was presented to the PRTC Board of Commissioners at its meeting on June 7, 2018.

Summary: “Key Factors Influencing Riders in North America: The emerging urban mobility ecosystem.”

Masabi issued a Google Surveys poll in the fall of 2017 to a diverse group of over 1000 US residents in order to gain an overview of the trends taking place in regards to public transit ridership across North America. The survey included both people who use public transit services and those who do not. All respondents, however, did have access to public transit services. Those who did not have access were excluded from taking the survey.

The survey was conducted to isolate the macro trends that are currently impacting public transit ridership and to indicate subgroup trends taking place, which might highlight behavior occurring and may spur others to conduct more in-depth research.

Topline findings include:

• Citizens are mostly optimistic about public transit services
• Public transit is still underutilized
• Convenience is the top priority for passengers when choosing to ride public transit
• Ridesharing is connecting public transit for many, facilitating multimodal journeys
• Convenience enablers attract riders (combining modes of transit through an app, mobile ticketing and location tracking)
• Private car ownership vs. ridesharing and public transit: The use of shared mobility services vastly increases the likelihood of riding public transit, pointing to a growing urban mobility system.

This report states that convenience, more than cost and necessity is the number one driver behind public transit ridership across all of the respondents. Riders with multiple options for transportation – the ones that are most rapidly reducing their reliance on public transit – are concerned first and foremost with convenience, not cost or comfort. While this means public transit agencies are vulnerable to losing riders to more convenient options, it also means that even minor improvements in convenience can boost ridership numbers.

Per this report, the bad news for public transit agencies is that their ridership numbers are indeed being impacted in some capacity by the increasing popularity of ridesharing services – nearly 10% of all consumers with access to public transit are using ridesharing on a weekly basis. The good news, however, is that there’s a major opportunity to play to the trend of combining ridesharing and public transit by creating first/last mile partnerships.

The report concludes that agencies can take a lesson from some of the convenient features that ridesharing apps provide, like location tracking and seamless payment, and deploy them relatively easily within their own systems. Increasing ridership by boosting convenience would have a positive impact on street congestion, while ridesharing can serve to replace personal vehicles in the first/last mile and in places underserved by public transit.

So what? How could OmniRide grow by becoming innovative?

The report’s findings clearly paint a picture of urban transit that is growing increasingly complex. Given what we know about the importance of convenience, it’s clear that many consumers who are not strictly motivated by price are combining public transit and ridesharing.

While fare reductions and service hour changes could certainly be cost prohibitive, technology changes are relatively inexpensive to implement and have also measurably increased ridership based on the data in this report. OmniRide is currently in the process of implementing a real-time arrival and location tracking application, but could also benefit from a mobile ticketing solution and first/last mile partnerships.

There is much more potential moving forward for interoperability between public and private services to enable full first/last mile journeys with public transit at its core. Not to mention the fact that relatively small changes in convenience – the addition of location tracking or convenient ticket purchase options, for example – could result in a major ridership boost for OmniRide in the short term. Increasing ridership, even marginally, is a must for OmniRide for the sake of our congested county.

Through better public/private partnerships and a more integrated transit system in general, it is possible to reduce overall congestion while enabling growth in Prince William County by:
• Increasing the use and ridership of OmniRide, starting with easier to deploy, consumer-facing features that increase convenience and build goodwill
• Recognize that OmniRide has been suffering from years of investment neglect, but that immediate changes can be made to start moving things in the right direction
• Facilitating partnerships between different modes of transit to increase efficiency
• Moving towards a more integrated transit model with closer partnerships between public and private organizations

There is no reason to be focused on one transportation mode or another. Instead, improving the current situation should be about facilitating seamless mobility and enabling consumers to use the best mode for each situation, thereby increasing convenience. This is absolutely critical to converting the riders who aren’t using public transit every day out of necessity – a huge growth opportunity that OmniRide can start taking advantage of right now.

Helping seniors through change and loss

Change happens to us all. So does loss. But for seniors, it starts happening more frequently, becoming an often unwelcome part of everyday life.

Whether it be the change in appearance as a result of aging, the loss of mobility or the death of a friend, life gets shaken up when things don’t remain the same. Sometimes that’s okay. But sometimes, when loss is involved, it causes grief. Especially if you care for a senior, here’s what you need to know.

Grief happens in stages

Most people have heard that grief comes in stages. What’s lesser known though, is these stages don’t have to come in any specific order and can be revisited multiple times.
 
The stages of grief can include shock, anger, denial, bargaining, depression, testing and acceptance.

Shock – Shock occurs initially when the loss happens, whether it is expected or not. It’s hard to deal with, but probably the best thing you can do is just be there for the senior in your care and acknowledge the reality of what has happened.

Anger – Anger can have many roots and various expressions. For example, a lack of preparation for a loss often fuels anger. If you’re caring for a senior who is angry about loss, validate that it is okay to be angry.

Denial – Denial occurs when a person does not want to recognize the truth. In this case, the senior in your care might not want to acknowledge loss. As a caregiver, it’s not your job to bring anyone down with harsh reminders. Gently referring to the loss, you can help by pointing out happy memories that remain.

Bargaining – Bargaining is an often misunderstood stage of grief. The senior in your care might try to offer something to change the reality of the loss, in hopes that the circumstance will remain the same. For example, they might say, “If my friend makes it out of surgery, I’ll never utter a bad word about her again.” You can help just by listening.

Depression – Depression is common for seniors, as it is for anyone faced with grief. This emotional stage is characterized by feelings of hopelessness and helplessness. While depression is normal to some extent, lingering depression is unhealthy. You can help the senior in your care by encouraging them to find things they like to do.

Testing – Testing is a mechanism people use when they are coming to terms with loss. Seniors in the testing stage cautiously consider the reality that staying in a deep, dark hole forever is not an option. When testing is successful, they start coming up with alternatives that will help them feel better. You can help the senior in your care by encouraging them to talk and explore their feelings and perceptions.

Acceptance – Acceptance happens when the loss is incorporated into the sum of the person’s experience. In this stage, the senior in your care might recognize the loss as just another part of life. Once this happens, they can move on.

Navigating through these stages can be tricky.  At times seniors may feel overwhelmed by the sheer number of losses they have to process. It is important to provide supportive, nurturing outlets for seniors, so they can get through this natural part of life.  A listening ear and a helping hand go a long way to getting your senior through this trying time.

This post is sponsored by Home Instead Senior Care serving Prince William and Fauquier counties.

Drastic 2017 crime stat swings: Rapes increase while murder rate plunges

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Helping first-time homebuyers navigate a tight market: 3 key steps from The Fauquier Bank

When it comes to purchasing a home, Mary Ann Andrews of The Fauquier Bank recommends buyers come in for a personal consultation, especially those who’ve never previously been through the complex process.

Buying a home can be daunting, between learning the lingo and understanding the financing. And given the current market conditions and limited housing inventory — which has sparked multiple offers and price bidding — it’s essential to know what you’re doing.

That’s where Andrews comes in.

“There’s so much you need to know,” says Andrews, NMLS # 482462, a TFB vice president and mortgage originator. “I like to sit down and explain how the process works.”

With first-time buyers, she adds, “I go over everything, just to get them comfortable with the language and the process.”

For tech-savvy potential buyers, it may seem tempting to do things online. But Andrews says there’s no substitute for meeting face-to-face.

“You can understand their needs,” she explains. “You can give them so much more information and discuss so many more options.”

Andrews can meet potential buyers at any of TFB’s 11 branches in Fauquier and Prince William counties.

For first-time buyers, Andrews follows a specific process. First things first: do your homework.

“Do your research and check out the area where you’re looking,” she advises. “You need to get with a realtor. And you need to find out what the taxes are and find out what the HOA fees are.” 

First-time buyers should follow these three key steps:

1. Prepare Financially: Begin by checking your credit score, saving for a down payment and figuring out how much you can afford to spend. Then meet with a mortgage originator to get pre-approved.

2. Understand Mortgages: Evaluate the different types of mortgage loans that are available and which works best for your situation.

3. Start Shopping: Look for a house that fits your needs and budget, then put in an offer. Gather the necessary documents for the loan processing and closing process.

NMLS #462668

Join us for a First-Time Homebuyer Seminar at 6 p.m. on Aug. 1 at BadWolf Brewing Company, 9776 Center St. in Manassas. Our mortgage originators will be available to answer questions. RSVP at 540-349-0202.

Enlarged prostate happens to every guy. There’s a new way to treat it at Sentara.

It’s one of the most common health issues for men as they grow older.

“As gentlemen age, the testosterone that’s in their body fuels the growth of their prostate so every guy that has testosterone and a prostate, it will eventually get larger. It happens in different rates in different people, but happens,” explains John B. Klein, M.D. of Potomac Urology.   

Even though it may not be commonly discussed, every day Dr. Klein sees patients suffering from an enlarged prostate, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH.)

Symptoms include frequent urination, difficulty starting and stopping urination, inability to completely empty the bladder and frequent trips to the bathroom in the middle of the night. 

“Urinary symptoms do not necessarily indicate prostate cancer, a majority of the time they’re from benign enlargement of the prostate. However, you can have prostate cancer and benign enlargement of the prostate –so it’s important to evaluate for both concurrently,” explains Dr. Klein.

Once the prostate screening comes back negative, there are a number of options to treat an enlarged prostate, everything from daily medications and in-office procedures to outpatient surgeries.

Dr. Klein was recently recognized as a Rezum Center of Excellence for his expertise in treating BPH. While pills to treat BPH have been around for years, Dr. Klein finds many of his patients discontinue taking those medicines because of side effects like dizziness and adverse effects to sexual function.

Rezum® is one of the minimally invasive procedures offered in office and takes just minutes to perform using steam to decrease the prostate. Laser enucleation of the prostate is another option.

Dr. Klein says this outpatient procedure has been offered at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center for the last 11 months and is ideal for patients with moderate and larger prostates. The newest option Sentara Northern Virginia is offering BPH patients is Aquablation, a surgery using water to resect the prostate.

The developments are exciting for Dr. Klein who looks forward to sharing the news with the community.

“This is one of the only centers in Northern Virginia that performs all three of these treatments options. It basically gives people a one-stop shop for their treatment, no matter size and shape of their prostate.”

Volunteers needed for the Christmas in July event on Saturday, July 21

Good Morning Prince William – Volunteers needed for the Christmas in July event on Saturday, July 21st.  This event is sponsored by The Philadelphia Tavern, Sinistral Brewing and Volunteer Prince William to benefit The Un-Tim-A-Tree Holiday Gift program for needy kids. Duties include selling drink tickets and checking IDs.  3 shifts available- 12noon-3pm, 3pm-6pm and 6-pm-9pm.  This is a fun, family event on Main Street, Old Town Manassas with raffles, giveaways, games, food, drinks and Santa!  Please sign up to help at mfoley@volunteerprincewilliam.org.  This promises to be great fun!

Prince William Soil & Water Conservation is having their next water quality monitoring event on Thursday July 12th at Evergreen Acres in Nokesville, 9:30-noon. Come learn about the health of local streams and how they interact with land uses.  Please call Veronica at (571) 379-7514 for more info.

ACTS needs volunteers to remove the flower beds in front of the thrift store on Tuesday and Thursday mornings starting July 10th. Please email Tamika for more info at: tmartin@actspec.org.

RSVP – The retired and Senior Volunteer Program is looking for volunteer’s age 55+ to deliver noon meals through the Meals on Wheels Program. Shrifts are just 2-3 hours and available in throughout the greater area.  RSVP members receive a mileage reimbursement and additional insurance coverage at no cost to the volunteer.  Please call Jan at (571) 292-5307 to learn more.

CASA Children’s Intervention Services needs volunteer advocates to help protect abused and neglected children in our community. You’ll receive fantastic training to give you all the skills needed to help these kids.  Please email Suzanne at: smitchell@casacis.org to learn more about the program and register for the next orientation session.

PW Conservation Alliance has several fun workdays coming up.  Please join them on the workdays of   July 20 and August 4th at Merrimac Farm, 9am-12noon.  It feels good to get your hands dirty.  Please RSVP for these events at (703) 490-5200 or via email at: alliance@pwconserve.org.

Care Net PRCs is looking for bilingual volunteers to help in their office in Manassas.  They are also having a movie event on July 14th, 7pm at Manassas Baptist Church. Come see the inspiring movie – I can Only Imagine.  Please email Kirk at crc@carenetprcs.org for more info.

K9s Serving Vets in Triangle, Virginia supports the process of partnering the vet with a service dog.  They assist from start to finish that will in the end change the veteran’s life.  Please consider donating to them on line at: k9sservingvets.org.

The PW Crime Prevention Council is looking for new volunteer members to promote safe communities.  The Council meeting the 2nd. Monday of the month at 7:30pm at 1 County Complex. Please register on the website at: pwcpc.org.

Virginia Cooperative Extension needs volunteers to lead financial seminars in Manassas and/or Woodbridge area.  Please email Victoria for more specifics at: smartmoney@pwcgov.org.

Mark your calendars for Saturday August 25th for the 3rd Annual Farm to Table event to support the Prince William Environmental Excellence Foundation at Windy Knoll Farm. The event runs from 3-8pm with 2 seating’s for dinner.  Tickets are just $40 for adults, $20 for children 13-18 and free for kids under 12.  There will be local vendors, artisan and farm sponsors and antique equipment.  It promises to fun for the entire family.  You can buy tickets on line at: princewilliamfarm2table2018.eventbrite.com.

The Manassas Senior Center is looking for a volunteer to teach crafts to the members of the center each week.  Come share your love of knitting, crocheting, painting, ceramics and such with others. Please call Jan at (571) 292-5307 for more info.  They also would love a volunteer to teach Sign Language class as well.  It’s a great way to share your skill. Please call Sue at 703-792-7154 to learn more.

Youth for Tomorrow is looking for volunteers to share hobbies and interests with the kids on weekends. If you have a little time please bring your interest to share with them such as sewing, gardening, cooking, golf, arts & crafts, jewelry to name just a few.  Please fill out the volunteer application with your resume at: youthfortomorrow.org.

The Greater Prince William Medical Reserve Corps needs both medical and non-medical volunteers to join their ranks.  These volunteers are trained to respond to public health emergencies as well as day to day health department activities.  They offer tons of training topics to build your skillset.  Please call Isabella at (703) 792-7341 to learn more.

If you are looking for other opportunities, please don’t forget to call my wonderful team at Volunteer Prince William. Jan can help you with the Retired and Senior Volunteer (RSVP) opportunities at (703) 369-5292 ext. 1, Shelley can help with any individual or group projects and send you weekly updates if you’d like. Shelley is at (703) 369-5292 ext. 2, and Bonnie can help you with opportunities available in Disaster Preparedness at (703) 369-5292 ext. 3. Please visit our website at www.volunteerprincewilliam.org. Thanks so much for all you do in our community.

Call to Action is a column written by Volunteer Prince William Executive Director Mary Foley.

Police subdue Quantico woman they say brandished a knife

From Prince William police: 

Stabbing Investigation | Assault & Battery on a Law Enforcement Officer [LEO]  On July 9 at 9:47AM, officers responded to a residence located in the 230 block of 4th Ave in the Town of Quantico (22134) to investigate a possible domestic involving a knife.
 
A third party caller reported to police that an unknown woman was seen holding a knife and threatening a man as they were standing on a balcony of the residence. Officers arrived and confronted the woman who was still holding the knife and threatening the man.
 
When officers challenged the woman, she ignored officers’ commands and went back into the residence. The woman eventually came to the door without the knife and refused to cooperate with officers. When officers attempted to detain the accused, she resisted.
 
Officers deployed pepper spray and, after a brief struggle, the accused was detained without further incident. Upon further investigation, officers determined that the victim, a 61-year-old man, and the accused, an acquaintance, were both intoxicated and became involved in a verbal altercation while standing on the balcony.
 
During the encounter, the accused retrieved a knife and stabbed the victim in the hand before officers arrived. Minor injuries were reported. Following the investigation, the accused was charged.
 
Arrested on July 9:

Jennifer HENRY, 45, of 15238 Wentwood Ln in Woodbridge
Charged with aggravated malicious woundingassault & battery on a LEOintoxicated in public, and obstruction of justice
Court Date: July 24, 2018 | Bond: Held WITHOUT bond

Madison Alicea of Dumfries makes Dean’s List

From an email: 

Each semester, Bard College at Simon’s Rock recognizes superior scholarship through the Dean’s List. Madison Alicea, of Dumfries, VA, has earned a place on the Dean’s List for the Spring 2018 semester. To be eligible for this honor, a student must carry 14 or more credits and achieve a grade point average of 3.5.

Bard College at Simon’s Rock: The Early College, founded in 1966 and nestled in the bucolic Berkshires, is the only college in the country specifically designed for bright, highly motivated students ready to enter college early, usually after the 10th or 11th grade. As part of the Bard network, Simon’s Rock has access to a global consortium of institutions–including numerous civic, scientific, and art organizations. Simon’s Rock offers a challenging program in the liberal arts and sciences, taught exclusively in small seminars by a supportive, highly trained faculty. The College grants degrees in more than 35 majors. The Princeton Review’s Best 380 Colleges rates academics at Simon’s Rock higher than Harvard and Princeton. For more information visit www.simons-rock.edu.

Praise sounds for Prince William County’s official Bugler

WOODBRIDGE    At a recent meeting of the Prince William County Board of County Supervisors, Donna Flory was named as the Prince William County Volunteer of the Quarter for the first quarter of 2018. Donna was nominated by Desiree Wolfe with the Office of Executive Management and the award was presented by Gail Macdonald, the county’s Senior Human Resources Manager, for Donna’s service as Prince William County’s official Bugle and Trumpet Player.

The award reads:

“Over the last two decades, Donna has played in various ceremonies and dedications in honor of Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day and 9/11.  Her rendition of ‘Taps’ continues to bring dignity and meaning to these very important events.  When asked to perform Donna has always answered ‘yes’ no matter the day.  Donna has always said it was her honor and privilege to play for Prince William County employees and citizens as we honor those who died for our freedom. Donna’s time and talent has helped make each ceremony memorable, especially for those who have lost a loved one.  For her ability to bring grace and reverence during the most solemn occasions we award Donna Flory the Prince William County Volunteer of the Quarter Award.”

Donna began volunteering as the Prince William County official Bugler in 1992.  Her first event was the original dedication ceremony of Prince William County’s War Memorial. 

Following the presentation, Donna thanked Desiree Wolfe for this very special nomination. Donna then acknowledged her longtime friend, Jane Beyer, and thanked her for getting her regularly involved in Prince William County events that honor those that have served our country and those that made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.

Child, 7, snatched during argument

From Prince William police: 

?Child Endangerment | Felony Eluding – On June 30 at 3:02AM, officers responded to an apartment located in the 18100 block of Kilmer Ln in Triangle (22172) to investigate a domestic assault.
 
The victim, a 23-year-old woman, reported to police that she was involved in verbal altercation with the accused, an acquaintance, while driving to an apartment in Dumfries. When the two arrived at their destination, the victim retrieved their 7-month-old child from the apartment and returned to the vehicle.
 
When the victim returned, the argument continued and escalated physically. During the encounter, the accused assaulted the victim and threw her cell phone to the ground, damaging it.
 
The accused then took the child from the victim and drove away, leaving the victim behind. The victim contacted police and provided a description of the vehicle the accused was driving.
 
A responding officer located the vehicle in the area of Dumfries Rd and Jefferson Davis Hwy and stopped the vehicle. While the officer was approaching the vehicle, the accused drove away at a high rate of speed with the juvenile still inside.
 
The officer followed the vehicle until it went through a red light on Jefferson Davis Hwy at Wayside Dr at which point the officer lost sight of the vehicle. Following the investigation, an officer obtained multiple arrest warrants for the accused who was eventually located at his residence in Woodbridge later that evening and arrested without incident.
 
No injuries were reported.
 
Arrested on June 30:

Sequan Anthony FOWLER, 23, of 12905 Kerrydale Rd in Woodbridge 
Charged with child endangermentdomestic assault & batterydestruction of propertyfelony eludingdriving on a revoked license, and disregarding a traffic signal 

Court Date: Pending | Bond: Held WITHOUT bond

The City of Manassas is home to two of Virginia’s leading industries

Two of the Commonwealths leading industries are major economic generators in the City of Manassas. 

According to a recent report from the Virginia Employment Commission, Manassas-based companies in the professional and technical services offer the 4th highest wages in the state. 

Healthcare and social assistance wages in Manassas rank in the top 10. 

Companies like Micron, Lockheed Martin, and Novant Health UVA Health system drive local economic growth and employ thousands in Manassas; thanks in part to the availability of skilled labor and the City’s pro-business climate. 

These fields account for nearly 25% of total employment and $77 billion in total wages state-wide.  As innovation and technological advancement continue to be made employment and wages are expected to rise. 

The City of Manassas works closely with its major employers, Northern Virginia Community College and George Mason University to ensure current and future workforce needs are met and the companies continue to grow and thrive.   

To read the full report, click here.   

 

Army vet takes control of her pain with the help of Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center

Yolanda Smith is a take-charge kind of woman. The retired Army veteran, mother of three and current Human Relations contractor is used to getting things done.

So, when her fibroids turned painful, she knew she had to take action.

“I’ve had fibroids for a number of years. I’ll say at least 10, but in the last 18 months they’ve increased their size dramatically and the pain had become unbearable,” explains Smith.

Fibroids are the most frequently seen tumors of the female reproductive system. It’s estimated between 20 to 50 percent of women of reproductive age have fibroids, although not all are diagnosed.

In the majority of the cases, the tumors are benign (non-cancerous), but the symptoms can be severe.  While some women have no or mild indicators, other women have severe and disruptive symptoms including heavy, prolonged menstrual cycles, abnormal bleeding between periods, pelvic and/or back pain and frequent urination. Smith suffered through many of these symptoms.    

“The pain became unbearable during my cycle and the bleeding was extreme. I cramped beyond belief. I was exhausted, I would stay home from work because I was so exhausted,” she remembers.

That’s when she turned to her doctor for help when an ultrasound showed three fibroids had increased in size. He gave her three options:

  1. Live with the pain

  2. Have surgery

  3. Have a hysterectomy

Dr. Venu Vadlamudi

Smith knew that a hysterectomy wasn’t the right treatment option for her, that’s when her primary care physician recommended “UFE” or Uterine Fibroid Embolization and referred her to the specialists at the Heart & Vascular Center at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center.

“I had never been to Sentara before, I’m used to military hospitals where I’m in my safe zone.  But, from the time I called to get a consultation with a physician there, Tina went above and beyond to make sure I got an appointment and got the necessary paperwork needed. She actually followed up with my military hospital to assure that documents were forwarded to Sentara to aid me in seeing a doctor there. I just thought that was exceptional,” said Smith.

Following clinical consultation, it was decided Dr. Venu Vadlamudi, an Interventional Radiologist, would perform the procedure.

“Interventional radiology is a field where we perform minimally invasive procedures using radiology guidance,” explains Dr. Vadlamudi. “I tell patients to imagine me as a plumber, working completely inside of the pipes.”

In Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) or Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) as it’s also known, Dr. Vadlamudi goes in through the artery with a catheter and blocks the blood flow to the fibroids using embolic agents (small particles or beads).” With the flow of blood compromised, the fibroids begin to shrink, taking with them the pain and symptoms.

“Over a matter of a few months’ time, these fibroids die away because you’ve taken away their blood supply. But again, nothing is physically tied, it’s not like putting a suture on top of the blood vessel or going from the outside, it’s all done from the inside of the blood vessel,” explains Dr. Vadlamudi. “We find it’s very rare new fibroids develop. So the overall success rate, especially from a technical standpoint, is well above 98 percent.”

In Smith’s case, Dr. Vadlamudi went in through a point above her wrist, leaving just a small nick after the procedure was completed.

“I don’t have a scar, just a little dot where he went into my arm,” she says.

After a short hospital stay, Smith went home to recover with doctor’s orders to start easing back into her routines. After almost two-weeks, she returned to work with her pain fading each day, but her admiration for the team continues to grow.

“It was just one of the best hospital visits I have ever had,” says Smith. “From the tech staff on down, everyone at Sentara Heart & Vascular Center was very attentive. They were very kind. Their bedside manner was exceptional.”

And, she offers this advice to other women living with fibroid pain.

“If you’re suffering from fibroids, definitely do your research, consider UFE, and consider UFE at Sentara, they have the best staff!” she adds.

If you’d like to learn more about Interventional Radiology or what Sentara Heart & Vascular can do for you, call 1-800-Sentara or visit Sentara.com.

Police to hit the water this weekend looking for drunken boaters

WOODBRIDGE — Prince William County police were on the Occoquan River on Thursday. 

Officers on the county’s police boat could be been on the water talking with other boaters that were anchored in Belmont Bay in Woodbridge. The patrols came the before the start of a larger enforcement effort — Operation Dry Water. 

This weekend, just before the biggest holiday of the summer, police will patrol the Potomac River and its tributaries in Prince William County making sure boaters are operating their crafts safely, and not under the influence of alcohol. 

More in a press release: 

Operation Dry Water (ODW) is a year-round, boating-under-the-influence, awareness and enforcement campaign. Its mission is to reduce the number of alcohol- and drug-related accidents and fatalities through increased recreational boater awareness and by fostering a stronger and more visible deterrent to alcohol use on the water.

Operation Dry Water’s heightened awareness and enforcement three-day weekend takes place annually around Independence Day. This year the campaign begins Friday and runs through July 1. Prince William County Police will be out on all navigable waters in the County, including the Occoquan and Potomac Rivers as well as at parks and businesses that front them.

The purpose of the heightened enforcement component of the Operation Dry Water campaign is to deter boaters from boating under the influence of drugs or alcohol. When boaters chose to boat impaired they are endangering not only themselves but also other boaters on the water.

Since the launch of Operation Dry Water in 2009, the number of boating fatalities with alcohol named as a contributing factor has decreased in the United States. However, alcohol use continues to be the leading known contributing factor in recreational boating deaths in the United States.

Amid state’s lowest unemployment since 2008, Virginians search for jobs in Manassas

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Why is swimming an essential skill?

Throughout your children’s lives, they will learn a great number of skills that will help their long-term development. Basic skills like reading, writing, and math are picked up throughout school, while social skills like manners and conversation are taught at home.

Swimming, however, is a skill that is not specifically taught in school or at home. It is a skill that not only promotes health but is also proven to be a potentially life-saving skill.

During your children’s growing stages, swimming is a great sport that allows them to exercise with low-impact resistance routines. Often times, children take a liking to the sport and continue to practice it in their middle and high school years.

Swimming focuses on core strengthening and flexibility, two very important health aspects. Whether they do it for fun or competitively, it is important to give your children access to this skill early on.

Aside from exercise, swimming is a crucial life-saving skill to have. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there were an average 3,536 fatal unintentional drownings between 2005 and 2014.

About one of five people who die by drowning are children 14 years or younger. Many cases of non-fatal drowning injuries often lead to hospitalization and can lead to PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) in later years. By learning to swim, a child’s life can potentially be saved when an adult is not present.

The Manassas Park Community Center offers a wide variety of swimming lessons. From six-month-olds to seniors, our swimming programs give students the ability to take up the skill with a variety of levels.

Our Parent and Child course is an introductory early childhood class in which a parent or guardian is in the water with the child. Our Preschool and School Age swimming classes are divided into levels based on skills received at prior levels. We also offer basic swimming and lap swim lessons for adults and seniors. It is never too late to learn this essential skill!

The Manassas Park Community Center is located at 99 Adams Street in Manassas Park, VA. Managed by the City of Manassas Park Department of Parks and Recreation, the facility is home to basketball courts, a swimming pool, wellness areas, special events, and recreational classes. For more information visit us at ManassasParkCommunityCenter.com or call at 703-335-8872.

Free webinar focuses risks, medication challenges for older adults

Research conducted by Home Instead Inc., franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network, indicates that as the number of prescription medication a person (ages 70 or older) takes increases, so do challenges with medication management and potential health risks.

Register for this webinar to discover the ways medications can jeopardize an older adult’s health and independence.  Learn about solutions that could help families and their older loved ones pinpoint potential threats an start the conversations that can potentially lead to effective solutions.

Participants in this webinar will be able to:

  • Identify the potential risks associated with medication mismanagement
  • Understand common medication challenges for older adults and signs to look for when medications are to blame for health issues
  • Recognize risks of common conditions that impact medication management
  • Help strengthen he role of the family in reducing the potential for medication risks
  • Learn more about resources to help families feel confident about keeping older adults safe at home

The webinar will be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and is offered in cooperation with the American Society on Aging.  For more information and to complete the required pre-registration, go to CaregiverStress.com/ProfessionalEducation 

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