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Traffic
Minnieville Road Widening Project moving along

PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY — The intersection of Minnieville Road and westbound Spriggs Road continues to be widened to include two left-turn lanes, two throughlanes, and one right-turn lane. This is the last leg of Minnieville Road that remains two lanes in the county, connecting Prince William Parkway to Route 234.

Once completed, the volume of daily traffic supported will increase from 9,100 to an estimated 18,500 cars per day, according to Lawrence Farrell, Chief of Engineering and Construction for Prince William County Department of Transportation. This additional capacity is expected to decrease traffic congestion significantly.

Currently, storm pipe installation and relocation of utilities are progressing. A prior dump site along the route required extensive earth removal and disposal, the result of large amounts of discarded tires and blocks of concrete, making it physically impossible to remove the items without also removing soil.

The road widening to two lanes is part of the County’s Comprehensive Plan and the 2006 Road Bond Program, which was passed by the citizens of Prince William County. The current design began in 2013, with right-of-way and utility relocation taking place in 2015-16. Construction started in November 2016.  

Prior to this project, a portion of Minnieville was improved, removing a curvy section of Minnieville Road between January Court and Hunter Crest Road. The road was not widened at that time because, Farrell said, “road construction is almost exclusively based on funding. Limited funding requires phasing the road construction.

According to the County’s official statement on road projects, the Prince William County Department of Transportation implements road projects that have been approved by the Board of County Supervisors. Projects are selected on a priority basis to improve road safety and to reduce traffic congestion. County voters also approve projects as part of a road bond referendum. Voter approval allows the County to sell bonds in order to establish funding for projects. Projects are suggested by citizens, th e Board of County Supervisors, the Police Department and County staff. Each project is selected based on improvements to road safety and traffic congestion issues.

Farrell said a Design Public Hearing/Citizens’ Information Meeting with significant public involvement was held June 30 this year at the Edward L. Kelley Leadership Center in Bristow to keep the public informed of the project’s status. A group of 89 Prince William County citizens attended the meeting. The county received 42 comments from them regarding the Minnieville Road project. The majority of the citizens were supportive of the project with a few wanting to ensure that sidewalks and shareduse paths were part of the initiative.

Although this was a bond project, Farrell said it will not use any local bond funding. This project is funded primarily through State Revenue Sharing funds and Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA)’s 30 percent Local Distribution Funds, along with some local proffer funds. The total project cost is $41 million.

The Minnieville Road project is on track to be completed in October 2018.

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