PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY, Va. – Michael Futrell will hold his first political office come January.

He unseated Republican Incumbent Mark Dudenhefer on Tuesday night and will be come the next man to represent Virginia’s 2nd House District. Futrell beat his opponent with a narrow 1.4% win.

With a political district that straddles Prince William and Stafford counties, Futrell won his seat thanks to the 10 heavily democratic precincts in Prince William County were he garnered 66% of the vote. As he has in the past, challenger Mark Dudenhefer won the majority of the 11 heavily Republican districts in Stafford County which round out the second half of the district. But it was not enough to carry him to victory.

Futrell says he’ll make it a priority to reach out to those in Stafford who did not vote for him.

“I don’t think I would call it the biggest upset of the night but I do think it was a well-deserved win,” said Futrell. “We’ve seen the numbers, and now we need to go forward and represent the entire district.”

Futrell overcame a challenge early on in the campaign when the text of his website was found to mirror that of another elected Democrat in Charlottesville. Over the summer, Futrell came under fire after he admitted he had not filed his taxes during the previous three years for his non-profit organization Make The Future that mentors area children.

He added he was surprised that the campaign took a negative turn, and that he is now looking to put differences aside and focus on transportation, education, and issues involving military members and their families, he said.

Outgoing Dudenhefer was the first to be elected to serve the 2nd District after it was created in 2010 following Virginia’s decennial redistricting process. In statement Tuesday night, he said he would continue to serve the state.

“We focused on the issues and what was important to Stafford and Prince William. I have been honored to represent these fine people for two years, and appreciate all the support I received, not only these past few months campaigning, but also legislating Richmond,” stated Dudenhefer.

Prior to heading to Richmond in 2011, he served as the Chairman of the Stafford County Board of Supervisors.