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Chick-fil-A Bristow’s charity golf tournament will benefit Patriot High School students working to make a better life

James Newman dreams of becoming a pilot. 

The 17-year-old student at Patriot High School is interested in all things aviation. Like most his age, he’s into video games. His favorite — a flight simulator. 

But before he can work is way into a career in the field of aviation, this teenager, like most is working a part-time job. He’s a barista at Starbucks. 

But, unlike other students, Newman is getting school credit for his work. 

He’s enrolled in a class called EMPLOY and life skills, where as many as 40 Patriot students, all with varying places on the autism spectrum, learn everything from basic life skills to the wherewithal of going out into the real world and working a job. 

“I come in with a smile. Even if its a crappy day, I try to make the customers happy,” said Newman.  

He’s worked at Starbucks for a year. Thanks to the EMPLOY class and his instructors, he’s learned simple tasks like how to make the correct change from a cash register to larger responsibilities, like household budgeting. 

“I knew what a paycheck was. I knew how to spend a paycheck but I didn’t know how to budget it,” he adds. 

Ryan Carter, 16, is also in the class. He’s into cooking food and riding rollercoasters. He’s got a YouTube channel of videos dedicated to the more than 80 coasters he’s ridden. 

To reach that number, he had to overcome his initial fear of coasters. Now, he hopes he can put that same determination into his future career. 

“I want to be a chef,” he said. 

He’s known for his own version of shrimp scampi, which includes a mixture of jumbo shrimp and jalapeño poppers. At home, and here at school, he’s encouraged to try new things. 

Tricia Weate and Brook Bell run the program at Patriot High School. Some students are enrolled in the life skills program where they get coaching on how to develop social skills and perform regular tasks. 

They learn the basics of kitchen food preparation and cooking, starting with washing hands, wearing gloves, using measuring cups, and it ends with making a meal.

They work the school’s mailroom, slotting mail for staff members to 237 mailboxes. They help set up and break down lunch shifts in the cafeteria.

In their classroom, they run a screen printing operation where they make t-shirts to raise awareness for autism.  

Other students in the program leave campus and go to restaurants and retail stores, where they work alongside their fellow employees. At Nando’s Peri Peri in Gainesville, some students greet restaurant guests, while others make food. At Fosters Grill, students deliver food. 

“They’re brilliant. We just want the community to see what we see,” said Bell. 

And some businesses have, like Smoothie King, which began providing their EMPLOY student workers with instructions on how to make drinks using color codes. It makes the process easier for them to understand. 

The instructors work with at least 20 community businesses and are always looking for more on which to partner. Some students are paid, while some work for class credit. 

“It’s not free labor. It’s also not ‘you’re so cute, let me help you out,” said Weate. “We want them to treat them like they treat their own staff.” 

“We don’t want sugar-coating. We want the real deal,” added Bell. 

The instructors are always looking for more funding for materials to teach their students, whether it be measuring cups or a replacement cash register to use in the classroom, something the program is in need of. 

The Second Annual Chick-fil-A Bristow Charity Golf Tournament on September 22 at Broad Run Golf & Practice Facility aims to do just that. The 18-hole four, four-person team event will welcome players at 8 a.m. for registration, and then they’ll take to the course for a 9 a.m. shotgun start. 

Chick-fil-A Bristow is looking for golfers for the event. It’s $75 for the public, $60 for cardholders, and $40 for full Broad Run Members. It includes a golf cart, range, and a lunch buffet. 

They’re also in need of corporate sponsors for the event. If you’re interested in playing or sponsoring, Chick-fil-A’s Susan Campbell would love to hear from you.

The proceeds from this charity golf tournament will go to benefit the children enrolled in the EMPLOY and life skills program at Patriot High School. 

“Without them starting this EMPLOY program, I would not have a job,” said Newman. “This class shows me there are many options out there for me.” 

Falmouth Elementary School implements nut-free classroom policy

STAFFORD — Administrators at Falmouth Elementary School chose to ban peanuts from classrooms this year. 

The move is a first in the region. 

More in an email from the school division: 

Falmouth Elementary School only asked that the classrooms are nut-free and not the cafeteria. Falmouth Elementary School is not a peanut free school.
 
They allow peanuts to be served in the cafeteria. There are no nut products allowed in the classrooms.
Here is a letter that went home to parents to help explain the policy.
 
Dear Falmouth Falcon Families,
 
The staff of Falmouth Elementary is proud to put the safety of our students first. This school year we have several students with severe nut allergies. Recognizing that food allergies may be severe and even life-threatening, we have implemented a Nut-Free Classroom Policy.
 
We ask that no nuts of any kind be brought into, or, consumed in our classrooms for any reason. Foods sent in for snack and class events should be carefully checked to make sure they are nut-free. The package cannot say “may contain trace amounts of nuts” or “made in a nut facility.”
 
Families can help ensure that our classrooms stay nut-free by reading packaging labels and reminding children not to share food with other children at school. We need to make sure that there is little opportunity for a child to be exposed to foods that could harm him/her.
 
Keep in mind that all items to be consumed (child’s birthday, party, etc.) within the classroom must be purchased from a store, be prepackaged and have the list of ingredients attached to the original packaging. Please be aware that food items sent or brought into classrooms that do not follow these guidelines will not be accepted. Students may bring foods containing nuts to lunch; however, please note there will be Nut-Free Tables labeled within the cafeteria.
 
We appreciate your understanding as we continue to put the safety of our students first.
 

Suggested Snacks

  • Fruit
  • Fresh, canned and dried
  • Crackers
  • Goldfish (except for the Giant brand sandwich type)
  • Graham (cinnamon, honey, chocolate, and Teddy Grahams)
  • Ritz, Saltines, Captains Wafers
  • Cheese Tidbits, Cheese Nips, Spongebob Crackers
  • Avoid all kinds of pre-made sandwich cracker contain peanuts – even the cheese on cheese crackers
  • Vegetables
  • Fresh and canned
  • Chips – Most are fine, but read the label to make sure the chips are not cooked in peanut oil. Kettle Chips are almost always cooked in Peanut Oil.
  • Potato Chips (plain or BBQ)
  • Cheese Puffs, Doodles or Cheetos
  • Fritos
  • Doritos
  • Pretzels – Most brands contain a disclaimer that they may be processed in a facility that also processes peanuts and tree nuts. Do not send these in forsnackif anything like this is on the label.
  • Fruit Snacks – Avoid Brachs. Other brands such as Nabisco, Betty CrockerandSunkist are fine.
  • An appropriate birthday treat would be store-bought MINI-CUPCAKES or cookies which state “contains no nuts.”

Prince William, Manassas schools prepare for Florence

From Prince William County Pubilc Schools: 

We have not made any plans to cancel school at this point. However, we will continually monitor the weather forecast and frequently communicate with the Prince William Office of Emergency Management for updates. We also have an agreement with the Office of Emergency Management to provide schools as emergency shelters, if needed.

As far as preparations, please see below:

  • Chainsaws fueled and staged
  • Plywood and rope stocked
  • Portable generators on stand-by
  • Permanent generators at sheltering sites will be topped off with fuel
  • Trucks will be fueled and ready with technicians on-call for any roof leaks, power outages, downed trees, etc.

Construction sites:

  • Sediment traps and silt fences will be cleaned out to maximize the amount of water they can handle
  • All construction materials secured and covered
  • All openings secured

We have also placed the following message on the front of our website: PWCS Monitoring Weather Forecast

“We are monitoring forecasts regarding Hurricane Florence, and we are in frequent contact with the Prince William County Office of Emergency Management. If we receive information that could impact our school schedule, we will communicate that information through our regular inclement weather communication avenues, including our website, the My PWCS app, text messaging, emails, and through the local media.”

From Manassas City Public Schools: 

 

Manassas student to participate in cooperative education program, work at Eaton Aerospace

We received this release about Manassas student Ryan Tracy:

University of Alabama student Ryan Tracy of manassas (sic), VA (20112), will participate in UA’s Cooperative Education Program for fall 2018.

Tracy will be working at Eaton Aerospace in Jackson, MS.

In the Cooperative Education Program, more than 250 students alternate periods of full-time study with periods of full-time employment.

This program offers work related to the academic major or career interests of each student, experience that enhances the students’ employment prospects after graduation.

While in school, students carry regular course schedules.

While on co-op, they work with professionals in their fields who supervise their training and work.

At work, co-op students earn competitive salaries and may receive benefit packages in addition to valuable job experience.

Participants maintain their full-time student status while at work and have priority registration status each semester through graduation.

The University of Alabama, the state’s oldest and largest public institution of higher education, is a student-centered research university that draws the best and brightest to an academic community committed to providing a premier undergraduate and graduate education.

UA is dedicated to achieving excellence in scholarship, collaboration and intellectual engagement; providing public outreach and service to the state of Alabama and the nation; and nurturing a campus environment that fosters collegiality, respect and inclusivity.

The University of Alabama, the state’s oldest and largest public institution of higher education, is a student-centered research university that draws the best and brightest to an academic community committed to providing a premier undergraduate and graduate education.

UA is dedicated to achieving excellence in scholarship, collaboration and intellectual engagement; providing public outreach and service to the state of Alabama and the nation; and nurturing a campus environment that fosters collegiality, respect and inclusivity.

Locals make Eastern Mennonite University All-Academic Team

From an email:

One hundred and five Eastern Mennonite University (EMU) students have been named to the Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) All-Academic Team, setting a new record of honorees for EMU. All 16 of EMU’s ODAC-sponsored sports were represented on the All-Academic Team.

The following local students are All-Academic Team honorees:

  • Taylor Baltimore of Bristow (20136) for Women’s Basketball
  • Christian Hansen of Manassas Park (20111) for Men’s Basketball
  • Spencer Laitinen of Woodbridge (22193) for Baseball

A student-athlete must achieve at least a 3.25 grade point average for the year to be considered for an ODAC All-Academic Award.

Sailors continue first-day-of-school tradition in Haymarket 

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Donovan Breeding, Drake Marshall welcomed by Wilkes University

From the Wilkes University press release:

Wilkes University welcomes nearly 700 first year students who make up the University’s newest class.

Donovan Breeding of Manassas, VA (20110) was welcomed into the class of 2022. Breeding is entering Wilkes as a Entrepreneurship major. Drake Marshall of Gainesville, VA (20155) was welcomed into the class of 2022. Marshall is entering Wilkes as a Undeclared major.

About Wilkes University:
Wilkes University is an independent institution of higher education dedicated to academic and intellectual excellence through mentoring in the liberal arts, sciences, and professional programs.

Founded in 1933, the university is on a mission to create one of the great small universities, offering all of the programs, activities, and opportunities of a large, research university in the intimate, caring, and mentoring environment of a small, liberal arts college, at a cost that is increasingly competitive with public universities.

In addition to 47 undergraduate majors, Wilkes offers the doctor of nursing practice, doctor of education and doctor of pharmacy degrees and more than a dozen master’s degree programs, including the master of business administration and master of fine arts in creative writing.

Dr. Steven Walts, Superintendent of Prince William County Public Schools, welcomes students back

A back-to-school message from Dr. Steven Walts, Superintendent of Prince William County Public Schools:

We enthusiastically await the arrival of approximately 91,000 students on the first day of the 2018-19 school year. Our educators and support staff are prepared and passionate about ensuring each student learns, grows, and excels.

Our commitment to serving individual needs is evident in this school year’s opening of Independence Nontraditional School. This unique, state-of-the-art school facility that combines the former New Directions and New Dominion Alternative Education Centers, as well as PACE East, provides all students with greater access to courses and Division resources.

Most any teacher will tell you that different people learn in different ways. That’s why I am thrilled to be opening a new school that focuses on meeting the needs of students who can reach great heights when given the right opportunities.

Completion of additions at Lake Ridge Middle School and Pattie Elementary School, and improvements to a third of other schools, will mean better learning space and comfort for staff and students Divisionwide. Renovations include a variety of upgrades, such as HVAC updates, partial roof replacements, new carpeting and flooring, painting, lighting, and parking lot paving, and much more.

The Pattie addition frees up space to make the Washington-Reid building a pre-K center. That will give some of our youngest learners valuable educational experiences in classrooms designed specifically for them. The early start pays dividends that last a lifetime.

Divisionwide, we’ll build on the strong foundation of teacher and learning successes we celebrated last year. Twenty-two of our schools earned 2018 Virginia Index of Performance Awards for academic achievement, nearly twice the number received just two years ago. Our 2018 graduates were awarded $74 million in scholarships, up 133 percent since 2016. And, PWCS was one of only five first-place winners among the nation’s large school divisions in the 2018 National School Boards Association Magna Awards competition. Our Advanced Programs for All initiative was recognized for helping all students, especially those in previously underrepresented groups, to take and succeed in rigorous advanced coursework.

Integration of technology into every course at every level prepares our students to be future-ready. Our growing Career and Technical Education programs open many avenues for success. Last school year, CTE students passed more than 9,500 valuable industry certifications. Some programs helped prepare students for lucrative employment in trades like welding, construction, and automotive work. In 2018-19, students can also take courses in Electricity levels I and II, Computer Game Design, and Cybersecurity Network Systems.

Of course, school safety is on everyone’s mind; and we’ve invested heavily in prevention and preparedness to keep students safe and secure. We’ve enhanced the physical measures built into many school structures. A county-funded pilot program will help us hire retired law enforcement officers as armed security to supplement current police who work as School Resource Officers, and our Division-employed School Security Officers. In combination with training for any eventuality, we’re working to minimize security threats by adding 13 social workers, another mental health specialist, a psychologist, and three additional high school counselors.

Of course, security concerns, and other challenges, often overshadow all the great news happening every day. As I visit with community members, parents, and school employees, I frequently hear a desire for more of the positive.

In response, we will bring you more web stories, social media, and other opportunities to see demonstrations of student knowledge, skills, accomplishments, and their readiness for further education for the 21st century workforce. You’ll also discover more about the great teachers and staff preparing them. We will bill them as Positively PWCS, with a visual look to spotlight them and ongoing opportunities for you to share great things you’ve learned about.

For now, I wish each of our students, staff, parents, and community members a wonderful new school year — a year filled with great results that are Positively PWCS.

With 16 lawsuits pending, Stafford School Board members urge Chairman to step aside during redistricting discussions

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Locals make University of Dallas Honor Roll

From an email: 

Nearly 300 University of Dallas students were named to the spring 2018 Honor Roll for earning a semester GPA of 3.0-3.49.

James Gallagher of Woodbridge (22192)

Patrick Gomez of Manassas (20110)

Andrew Lane of Woodbridge (22192)

Sean McCardell of Bristow (20136)

Edward O’Keefe of Manassas (20111)

Brendan Rogers of Manassas (20111)

The University of Dallas, located in a metropolitan area of nearly 7 million people, is a leading Catholic university widely recognized for academic excellence by well-known publications, organizations and accrediting bodies. It offers distinctive individual undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs in the liberal arts, business and ministry that are characterized by an exceptional, engaged faculty, a commitment to shaping principled, well-skilled leaders and academic rigor in the Catholic intellectual tradition. For more information, visit www.udallas.edu.

2 area students make Deans’ lists

From an email: 

Eddie Campell of Manassas, VA (20110) was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2018 semester at Washington University in St. Louis. Campell is enrolled in the university’s College of Arts & Sciences. To qualify for the Dean’s List in the College of Arts & Sciences, students must earn a semester grade point average of 3.6 or above and be enrolled in at least 14 graded units.

Teagan Nurnberger, of Stafford, Deaf/Hard of Hearing/El, The following students have earned the esteemed honor of placement on the Dean’s List at The College of New Jersey for the spring 2018 semester. To achieve this honor, a student must carry 12 or more credits that semester and earn a 3.5 (or above) grade point average.

Stevenson University congratulates Darian Hileman of Bristow, Va. for being named to the Dean’s List for the Spring 2018 Semester.  Stevenson University student Darian Hileman is honored for being named to the Spring 2018 Semester Dean’s List. Students who earn the Dean’s List honor must carry at least 12 graded credit hours and earn a grade point average of a 3.50 or better.

Congratulations to Calvin Michie, of Dumfries, for graduating from Stevenson University on May 17, 2018. We wish Calvin the best of luck in the future!

Stevenson University is a coeducational, independent institution widely known for its unique synthesis of traditional liberal arts education and exceptional career preparation. The 4,200 students receive an innovative education from the six academic schools- Business and Leadership, Design, Education, Humanities and Social Sciences, Sciences, and Graduate and Professional Studies. 

 

Stafford schools officials buck trailer classrooms as overcrowding gets worse

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Kizner becomes Stafford’s fourth schools superintendent in nine and a half years

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Stafford students will head back to class before Labor Day starting in 2019

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Stafford teachers like the idea of a pre-Labor Day school start. Parents are mixed.

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