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Army vet takes control of her pain with the help of Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center

Yolanda Smith is a take-charge kind of woman. The retired Army veteran, mother of three and current Human Relations contractor is used to getting things done.

So, when her fibroids turned painful, she knew she had to take action.

“I’ve had fibroids for a number of years. I’ll say at least 10, but in the last 18 months they’ve increased their size dramatically and the pain had become unbearable,” explains Smith.

Fibroids are the most frequently seen tumors of the female reproductive system. It’s estimated between 20 to 50 percent of women of reproductive age have fibroids, although not all are diagnosed.

In the majority of the cases, the tumors are benign (non-cancerous), but the symptoms can be severe.  While some women have no or mild indicators, other women have severe and disruptive symptoms including heavy, prolonged menstrual cycles, abnormal bleeding between periods, pelvic and/or back pain and frequent urination. Smith suffered through many of these symptoms.    

“The pain became unbearable during my cycle and the bleeding was extreme. I cramped beyond belief. I was exhausted, I would stay home from work because I was so exhausted,” she remembers.

That’s when she turned to her doctor for help when an ultrasound showed three fibroids had increased in size. He gave her three options:

  1. Live with the pain

  2. Have surgery

  3. Have a hysterectomy

Dr. Venu Vadlamudi

Smith knew that a hysterectomy wasn’t the right treatment option for her, that’s when her primary care physician recommended “UFE” or Uterine Fibroid Embolization and referred her to the specialists at the Heart & Vascular Center at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center.

“I had never been to Sentara before, I’m used to military hospitals where I’m in my safe zone.  But, from the time I called to get a consultation with a physician there, Tina went above and beyond to make sure I got an appointment and got the necessary paperwork needed. She actually followed up with my military hospital to assure that documents were forwarded to Sentara to aid me in seeing a doctor there. I just thought that was exceptional,” said Smith.

Following clinical consultation, it was decided Dr. Venu Vadlamudi, an Interventional Radiologist, would perform the procedure.

“Interventional radiology is a field where we perform minimally invasive procedures using radiology guidance,” explains Dr. Vadlamudi. “I tell patients to imagine me as a plumber, working completely inside of the pipes.”

In Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) or Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) as it’s also known, Dr. Vadlamudi goes in through the artery with a catheter and blocks the blood flow to the fibroids using embolic agents (small particles or beads).” With the flow of blood compromised, the fibroids begin to shrink, taking with them the pain and symptoms.

“Over a matter of a few months’ time, these fibroids die away because you’ve taken away their blood supply. But again, nothing is physically tied, it’s not like putting a suture on top of the blood vessel or going from the outside, it’s all done from the inside of the blood vessel,” explains Dr. Vadlamudi. “We find it’s very rare new fibroids develop. So the overall success rate, especially from a technical standpoint, is well above 98 percent.”

In Smith’s case, Dr. Vadlamudi went in through a point above her wrist, leaving just a small nick after the procedure was completed.

“I don’t have a scar, just a little dot where he went into my arm,” she says.

After a short hospital stay, Smith went home to recover with doctor’s orders to start easing back into her routines. After almost two-weeks, she returned to work with her pain fading each day, but her admiration for the team continues to grow.

“It was just one of the best hospital visits I have ever had,” says Smith. “From the tech staff on down, everyone at Sentara Heart & Vascular Center was very attentive. They were very kind. Their bedside manner was exceptional.”

And, she offers this advice to other women living with fibroid pain.

“If you’re suffering from fibroids, definitely do your research, consider UFE, and consider UFE at Sentara, they have the best staff!” she adds.

If you’d like to learn more about Interventional Radiology or what Sentara Heart & Vascular can do for you, call 1-800-Sentara or visit Sentara.com.

Police to hit the water this weekend looking for drunken boaters

WOODBRIDGE — Prince William County police were on the Occoquan River on Thursday. 

Officers on the county’s police boat could be been on the water talking with other boaters that were anchored in Belmont Bay in Woodbridge. The patrols came the before the start of a larger enforcement effort — Operation Dry Water. 

This weekend, just before the biggest holiday of the summer, police will patrol the Potomac River and its tributaries in Prince William County making sure boaters are operating their crafts safely, and not under the influence of alcohol. 

More in a press release: 

Operation Dry Water (ODW) is a year-round, boating-under-the-influence, awareness and enforcement campaign. Its mission is to reduce the number of alcohol- and drug-related accidents and fatalities through increased recreational boater awareness and by fostering a stronger and more visible deterrent to alcohol use on the water.

Operation Dry Water’s heightened awareness and enforcement three-day weekend takes place annually around Independence Day. This year the campaign begins Friday and runs through July 1. Prince William County Police will be out on all navigable waters in the County, including the Occoquan and Potomac Rivers as well as at parks and businesses that front them.

The purpose of the heightened enforcement component of the Operation Dry Water campaign is to deter boaters from boating under the influence of drugs or alcohol. When boaters chose to boat impaired they are endangering not only themselves but also other boaters on the water.

Since the launch of Operation Dry Water in 2009, the number of boating fatalities with alcohol named as a contributing factor has decreased in the United States. However, alcohol use continues to be the leading known contributing factor in recreational boating deaths in the United States.

Amid state’s lowest unemployment since 2008, Virginians search for jobs in Manassas

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American Legion Post 1799 of Haymarket/Gainesville sends participants to Boys, Girls State programs

From an email: 

Six boys and two girls, sponsored by American Legion Post 1799 of Haymarket/Gainesville, have completed the Virginia Boys State and Girls State programs of the American Legion Department of Virginia.  

Boys State, held at Radford University and Girls State, held at Longwood University, each from June 17-23, provides delegates with an immersive experience designed to enshrine within them with knowledge of the rights and privileges, duties, and responsibilities of citizens of Virginia.  

Delegates have the opportunity to run for election for various offices including mayor, city council, sheriff, Supreme Court justice, delegate, senator, attorney general, lieutenant governor, and governor.   Attendees participate in mock legislative and court sessions designed to provide a real-world experience that simulates the functions of state government.  

In addition, delegates have the opportunity to participate in recreational activities ranging from band and chorus to athletics.  Delegates are also afforded the opportunity to attend classes in public speaking and parliamentary procedures.  

This year’s guest speakers included Lieutenant Governor Justin Fairfax, and Governor Ralph Northam as well as several members of the Virginia House of Delegates and State Senate.

Post 1799 annually selects delegates from Battlefield and Patriot High Schools, based on the applicant’s academic performance, interest in civics, and demonstrated a commitment to public and community service.  

This year’s Boys State attendees were Blake Brown (elected State Delegate), Casey Cho, Austin Gonzales (elected Mayor), Nathan Hakimpour (elected State Senator), Norideen Hussny-Hunt,  and Robert Lazar (elected to City Council).  Girls State attendees were Victoria Witmer and Claire Graser.

Exclusive: I-66 safety concerns raised over proposed Boy Scouts gun range

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Why is swimming an essential skill?

Throughout your children’s lives, they will learn a great number of skills that will help their long-term development. Basic skills like reading, writing, and math are picked up throughout school, while social skills like manners and conversation are taught at home.

Swimming, however, is a skill that is not specifically taught in school or at home. It is a skill that not only promotes health but is also proven to be a potentially life-saving skill.

During your children’s growing stages, swimming is a great sport that allows them to exercise with low-impact resistance routines. Often times, children take a liking to the sport and continue to practice it in their middle and high school years.

Swimming focuses on core strengthening and flexibility, two very important health aspects. Whether they do it for fun or competitively, it is important to give your children access to this skill early on.

Aside from exercise, swimming is a crucial life-saving skill to have. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there were an average 3,536 fatal unintentional drownings between 2005 and 2014.

About one of five people who die by drowning are children 14 years or younger. Many cases of non-fatal drowning injuries often lead to hospitalization and can lead to PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) in later years. By learning to swim, a child’s life can potentially be saved when an adult is not present.

The Manassas Park Community Center offers a wide variety of swimming lessons. From six-month-olds to seniors, our swimming programs give students the ability to take up the skill with a variety of levels.

Our Parent and Child course is an introductory early childhood class in which a parent or guardian is in the water with the child. Our Preschool and School Age swimming classes are divided into levels based on skills received at prior levels. We also offer basic swimming and lap swim lessons for adults and seniors. It is never too late to learn this essential skill!

The Manassas Park Community Center is located at 99 Adams Street in Manassas Park, VA. Managed by the City of Manassas Park Department of Parks and Recreation, the facility is home to basketball courts, a swimming pool, wellness areas, special events, and recreational classes. For more information visit us at ManassasParkCommunityCenter.com or call at 703-335-8872.

Free webinar focuses risks, medication challenges for older adults

Research conducted by Home Instead Inc., franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network, indicates that as the number of prescription medication a person (ages 70 or older) takes increases, so do challenges with medication management and potential health risks.

Register for this webinar to discover the ways medications can jeopardize an older adult’s health and independence.  Learn about solutions that could help families and their older loved ones pinpoint potential threats an start the conversations that can potentially lead to effective solutions.

Participants in this webinar will be able to:

  • Identify the potential risks associated with medication mismanagement
  • Understand common medication challenges for older adults and signs to look for when medications are to blame for health issues
  • Recognize risks of common conditions that impact medication management
  • Help strengthen he role of the family in reducing the potential for medication risks
  • Learn more about resources to help families feel confident about keeping older adults safe at home

The webinar will be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and is offered in cooperation with the American Society on Aging.  For more information and to complete the required pre-registration, go to CaregiverStress.com/ProfessionalEducation 

The Fredericksburg Nationals? City aims to lure baseball team from Woodbridge.

FREDERICKSBURG — They’re clearly excited in Fredericksburg.

City officials on Tuesday posted to their Facebook page announcing the city was in the works to sign a letter of intent with the Potomac Nationals. That agreement would move the team from their home in Woodbridge, where they’ve been since 1984.

The partnership was announced at a Fredericksburg City Council meeting. The team could relocate to a new stadium to be built somewhere on a tract of undeveloped land called Celebrate Virginia South, near the city’s convention center and Mark’s and Harrison Amphitheater.

According to fredericksburgbaseball.com, if the team reaches an agreement with the city it would remain in Fredericksburg for 30 years. The deal would include a new 5,000-seat stadium for the team similar to what the team had envisioned to be built at Stonebridge at Potomac Town Center in Woodbridge.

Potomac Nationals Team Owner Art Silber could not be reached for comment Tuesday night.

News of the potential move comes about a year after Prince William County officials failed to come to an agreement with Silber on a financing package for his new stadium in Woodbridge. It would have been located behind Wegmans at the town center, and, for the team, it would be a replacement for Richard G. Pfitzner Stadium, where the P-Nats have called home since moving to Woodbridge from Alexandria in 1984.

The team has talked about the need for a new stadium for about 20 years.

The Fredericksburg City Council is expected to review and vote on the letter of intent at its July 10 meeting, according to the city’s Facebook page.

This is not the first time Fredericksburg has tired to lure a team to the city. In 2013, officials were in negotiations with the Hagerstown Suns, of Maryland. But negotiations fell through when costs for a new 5,000-seat stadium grew beyond the initial $30 million price point, something similar to what happened during the P-Nats negotiations with Prince William leaders.

The Fredericksburg City Treasurer is set to begin selling parcels on the land on which the new P-Nats stadium would be built. The owners of undeveloped property owe more than two years of back tax payments.

Fredericksburg officials posted this logo to the city’s Facebook page on June 26, 2018.

Beauty Bandit hits cosmetic store near Dumfries

From Prince William police: 

Commercial Burglaries – On June 26 at 1:49AM, officers responded to Beauty Town located at 17064 Jefferson Davis Hwy in Dumfries (22026) to investigate an alarm activation. When officers arrived, they discovered an unsecured rear door. The investigation revealed the suspect entered a neighboring business, China 1, through a front window that was found damaged. Once inside, the suspect cut a hole into the drywall to gain access to Beauty Town. An undisclosed amount of money was taken from China 1, and hair clippers were reported missing from Beauty Town. A police K-9 was used to search for the suspect who was not located. The investigation continues.
Suspect Description:

Black male, approximately 17-21 years old, with a thin build 
Last seen wearing a blue hooded sweatshirt with a red and blue stripe across the front and back, black jeans, white socks, blue shoes, and a bandana covering his face.

26 people from 14 homes displaced by Woodbridge fire

From a press release: 

Occoquan-Woodbridge-Lorton Volunteer Firefighters responded to the report of an apartment fire at 1284 Bayside Avenue within minutes and reported smoke showing from the front of the building.

Crews entered the apartment building to search for one resident who was reported unaccounted for by Prince William County Police, so a second alarm was called.

Fire was knocked down approximately 20 minutes later. The missing resident was later located, uninjured, after self-evacuating. Crews remained on scene for several hours. 26 people and two dogs were displaced. 14 units were affected. There were no reported injuries. Red Cross was called in to assist.

The blaze is under investigation by the Prince William County Fire Marshal’s Office. Fire and Rescue units from OWL VFD, Dale City VFD, PWCDF&R, Dumfries-Triangle VFD, PWC PD responded to the incident.

Hylton Performing Arts Center’s Niyati awarded for work with vets

Dr. Niyati Dhokai, of the Hylton Performing Arts Center, was honored for her work with veterans. 

More from an email: 

Niyati is a Mason alumna who currently serves as Program Manager of the Veterans and the Arts Initiative at the Hylton Performing Arts Center in Manassas, as well as Research Assistant Professor at Mason’s College of Visual & Performing Arts. Last week, she was one of the exemplary women honored at the Virginia Department of Veterans Services Summit “Change Makers & Trailblazers: The Power of Being a Woman-The Strength of Being a Veteran.” Niyati was named Change Maker of the Year in recognition of her establishment of the Veterans and Arts Initiative. Please see the press release attached for details.

Spearheaded by Niyati, the Veterans and the Arts Initiative provides year-round arts opportunities for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families, and military caregivers. These opportunities include workshops, exhibitions, and special events featuring music, visual art, dance, theater, and poetry. The Initiative collaborates with local Veteran Service Organizations (VSOs), community groups, and arts organizations—as well as the Schools and programs within the College of Visual and Performing Arts at George Mason University—to support lasting connections to the arts, community support, and camaraderie. The goal is to serve our local Veterans, Servicemembers, and their families through the arts.

You can find more information about the Veterans and the Arts Initiative athttps://hyltoncenter.org/veterans/.

22 new Prince William police officers graduate academy

PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY — The Prince William County Criminal Justice Academy Basic Law Enforcement 42nd Session graduated on Friday, June 22, 2018, at 10 a.m. at the Hylton Performing Arts Center, 10960 George Mason Circle, just outside Manassas.

The 22 men and women completed a 24-week course of training in all aspects of police work, including classes in firearms, use-of-force decision making, driver training, legal training, patrol techniques, criminal investigation and crash investigation.

To put their lives on the line serving the community, starting officers make $48,000 a year. Now graduated from the training academy, the officers will serve in one of three police districts in the county — on the east side in Woodbridge, on the western end near Manassas, and a new central police district created when the department opened its third police station on Davis Ford Road earlier this year. 

The graduating law enforcement personnel are listed below, and brief biographies of each graduate follow:

Flynn X. Allen served in the U.S. Army Reserves prior to joining the Department. Additionally, he has family in law enforcement. Officer Allen is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

James T. Clinton is a graduate of The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va., with a bachelor’s degree in sociology. He has family in law enforcement. Officer Clinton is assigned to work patrol in central Prince William County.

Luiz Carlos J. Da Silva, Jr., is a graduate of Theodore Roosevelt High School in Washington, D.C. He worked in the health care industry prior to joining the Department. He is fluent in Portuguese and Spanish. Officer DaSilva is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

Xavier P. Garcia is a graduate of King High School in Corpus Christi, Texas. He served in military law enforcement in the U.S. Marine Corps prior to joining the Department. Officer Garcia is assigned to work patrol in eastern Prince William County.

K. Ernest Grenke is a graduate of Culpeper County High School in Culpeper, Va. He served in The Old Guard in the U.S. Army prior to joining the Department. Officer Grenke is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

Leathan R. Hopkins is a graduate of Virginia Wesleyan College in Virginia Beach, Va., with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. Officer Hopkins is assigned to work patrol in central Prince William County.

Cody W. Jones is a graduate of Great Bridge High School in Chesapeake, Va. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps prior to joining the Department. Officer Jones is assigned to work patrol in central Prince William County.

Jesse L. Kesterson is a graduate of Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. He served in security forces in the U.S. Air Force prior to joining the Department.  Officer Kesterson is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

Adnan M. Khan is a graduate of George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., with a bachelor’s degree in criminology. He is fluent in Pashto. Officer Khan is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

Christopher J. Lehn is a graduate of CUNY Queens College in Flushing, N.Y., with a bachelor’s degree in accounting. Officer Lehn is assigned to work patrol in eastern Prince William County.

Ryan J. Linkous served in military law enforcement in the U.S. Marine Corps prior to joining the Department. Additionally, he was Class Guide of the 42nd Session. Officer Linkous is assigned to work patrol in central Prince William County.

Travis D. Martin is a graduate of West Virginia University in Morgantown with a bachelor’s degree in criminology. He also serves in the U.S. Army Reserve. Officer Martin is assigned to work patrol in central Prince William County.

Michael C. Miller, II, is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

Benjamin S. Montgomery has family in law enforcement. Officer Montgomery is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

James K. Murray is a graduate of the University of Mississippi in Oxford with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. He has family in law enforcement. Officer Murray is assigned to work patrol in eastern Prince William County.

Rachel A. Mynier is a graduate of the University of Texas at San Antonio, with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. She worked in law enforcement in Florida prior to joining the Department.  Officer Mynier is assigned to work patrol in eastern Prince William County.

Christopher J. Russo is a graduate of Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, N.Y., with an associate degree in criminal justice. He served in military law enforcement in the U.S. Navy prior to joining the Department. Officer Russo is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

Charles D. Simmons, Jr., is a graduate of Lord Fairfax Community College in Warrenton, Va., with an associate degree in criminal justice. Officer Simmons is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

Liam M. Solis-Santana served in the U.S. Marine Corps prior to joining the Department. He is fluent in Spanish. Officer Solis-Santana is assigned to work patrol in eastern Prince William County.

August C. Stickel, V, is a graduate of Pennsylvania State University in Altoona, Pa., with a bachelor’s degree in political science. He served in the U.S. Army prior to joining the Department. Officer Stickel is assigned to work patrol in eastern Prince William County.

William J. Ward is a graduate of Park View High School in Sterling, Va. He worked in the health care industry prior to joining the Department. Additionally, he was Class President of the 42nd Session. Officer Ward is assigned to work patrol in western Prince William County.

LeAndra K. Watford is a graduate of Paul D. Camp Community College in Virginia with an associate degree in criminal justice. Additionally, she serves in the U.S. Army National Guard. Officer Watford is assigned to work patrol in eastern Prince William County.

A police spokesman says the department is still hiring for new officers. Interested applicants may apply by going to joinpwcpd.org.

A series of zesty days coming to Occoquan in July

From an email: 

Escape the heat and enjoy a lemon zesty day in Occoquan. Explore this historic waterfront town and soak up the flavor of the day enjoying free tasty lemon treats and sipping lemonade.

Discover our independent small businesses, services and cafes. Shop for ongoing specials, bargains and unique finds in our boutiques. Some specials only available during this event. 

Savor a meal, waterside or in a cozy courtyard at one of our restaurants. Stop in at the Tourist Information Center for business information and things to do. Don’t miss the Mill House Museum for local history about our 1700’s town.

Follow the yellow balloons for participating businesses from 10am-5pm each day.

  • Sponsored by The Occoquan Merchants’ Guild

  • 6th Annual Occoquan Lemonade Stroll

  • Townwide Event

  • July 20th & 21st 2018, 10am – 5pm each day

  • Participating businesses each serving Free lemon treats

  • Historic Town just 30 minutes south of DC, I-95 exit 160

  • Free Parking

  • 100% Independent Small Businesses & Restaurants (no chains)

 

$78 million road fix: We’ve got your first look at 2 new interchanges coming to Route 234 near Manassas

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Now you can post your event fliers to Potomac Local

Starting today, we’re giving businesses and non-profit organizations more ways to reach our readers.

Now Potomac Local users may choose to upload a flier to promote their business, product, or upcoming event to our Submit News Page. Our $49.50 “Flier Post” option allows users to upload a PDF or JPEG flier file to our website where it will be featured on PotomacLocal.com homepage.

Our $99.50 “Flier Plus” option allows users to have their fliers featured on both our PotomacLocal.com homepage and on our social media. That’s a reach of more than 150,000 local readers.

People make creative fliers to promote themselves because it’s quick, easy, and fun. Now we’ve made it easy to upload those fliers to our website.

We will also continue to serve those who would rather a written press release posted to PotomacLocal.com instead of a flier because you value our high SEO ranking and the results it can produce for their business or organization.

Our $299 “News Post” option puts your press release on our PotomacLocal.,com website homepage, and on social media. Our $349 “News Plus” option allows you to collect user-submitted emails address right from your press release. We collect the emails and send them to you automatically.

Over the years, our readers and advertisers have used PotomacLocal.com’s “Submit News” feature to post their news to our website, which is then reviewed and approved by Potomac Local before it’s published to the website. The addition of the Flier and Flier Plus options come in response to many requests from local business owners looking for a faster, more convenient way to reach more local customers.

Uploading your content to our site is easy, and you can choose pay with a credit or debit card right on our site. 

Please email us if you have any questions about how to submit your news and events to PotomacLocal.com.

You may also submit events at no charge to our events calendar, but please remember that these posts show up only on our events calendar and are not featured as individual posts on our homepage, and are not featured on our social media. 

OmniRide passengers moved off stalled bus at I-66 and I-495

FAIRFAX COUNTY — Some OmniRide passengers had to get off their bus this afternoon at the busy intersection of Interstates 66 and 495 near Tysons Corner.

A commuter coach carrying passengers traveling on I-66 eastbound for the Portsmouth Commuter Lot near Manassas broke down on the highway leaving passengers stranded. A second OmniRide commuter bus was sent to pick up the passengers.

Those passengers exited the bus just before 2 p.m. into the pouring rain and got on the second bus that pulled up behind the disabled bus, which had broken down on the left shoulder of I-66.

“We always check first with [the Virginia Department of Transportation] to make sure roadway conditions are safe enough for us to allow passengers to get off the bus,” said OmniRide spokeswoman Katy Nicholson.

Traffic on I-66 where the bus had broken down was slow and congested as passengers de-boarded their bus.

It’s unclear how many passengers were on board the bus when it broke down.

Rape, unlawful filming charges filed in two cases involving minors

From Prince William police:

Rape | Abduction with Intent to Defile – On June 20, detectives from the Special Victims Unit began an investigation into a rape which was reported to have occurred at a residence located in the Woodbridge (22193) area of Prince William County. The investigation revealed the victim, 12-year-old girl, was raped by the accused, a family member, on more than one occasion in April and June of 2018. The incidents were recently disclosed and police conducted an investigation in the allegations. Following the investigation, the accused, identified as Jose Hector GONZALEZ ORTIZ, was arrested.
 
Arrested on June 21:
Jose Hector GONZALEZ ORTIZ, 35, of the Woodbridge area
Charged with 2 counts of rape and 1 count of abduction with intent to defile
Court Date: Pending | Bond: Held WITHOUT Bond
Also from Prince William police, a separate incident: 
Aggravated Sexual Battery | Unlawful Filming – On June 6, detectives from the Special Victims Unit began an investigation into a sexual assault which was reported to have occurred at a residence located in the Manassas (20109) area of Prince William County. The investigation revealed the victim, an 11-year-old girl, was inappropriately filmed by the accused, an acquaintance, on more than one occasion between November 2016 and June 2018. On one of the occasions, the accused sexually assaulted the victim. The incidents were recently disclosed and police conducted an investigation in the allegations.
 
Following the investigation, detectives obtained warrants for the arrest of the accused, identified as Esteban CARRILLO ZAPETA.  The accused was located and arrested by members of the U.S. Marshals Fugitive Task Force at an address in Hyattsville, Maryland on June 21.
 
The accused will remain in custody in Maryland until extradited back to Virginia.
 
Arrested on June 21: [No photo available]
Esteban CARRILLO ZAPETA, 32, of no fixed address
Charged with aggravated sexual battery, unlawful filming, and production of child pornography
Court Date: Pending | Status: Awaiting Extradition

Crews lay 10 feet of new pipe in water main repair

DUMFRIES — Water crews mopped up a mess in Dumfries.

Workers fixed a burst 12-inch water main Wednesday evening that snarled traffic in Virginia’s oldest, continuously chartered town. The pipe, located between Tripoli Boulevard and Old Stage Coach Road, ruptured about 1:30 p.m. Crews had the water shut off about 15 minutes later, but the damage to the afternoon commute had been done.

Authorities closed Route 1 in both directions Wednesday afternoon while the Prince William Service Authority made its repairs. The work was completed about 9 p.m.

Very few customers went without water during the repairs.

“A handful of businesses and residences of were out of service that afternoon, including the Liberty Village commercial park,” a Prince William Service Authority spokesman told us.

Water to those customers was restored about 6:30 p.m. Crews laid a total of 10 feet of new pipe during the repair.

Wound Healing Center opens at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center

Today, Thursday, June 21, 2018, Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center officially unveiled its newly renovated and expanded Sentara Wound Healing Center during a ribbon cutting attended by current and past Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center Board members, the Potomac Health Foundation Board, administration, physicians, community members and members of the team. 

The Sentara Wound Healing Center has a history of offering its patients a comprehensive, specialized team approach in dealing with non-healing and difficult to heal wounds. This recent renovation permits easier access for patients and staff with larger doorways and halls. The expansion also includes more storage space and room for the introduction of an advanced treatment option:  Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

The addition of Sentara Wound Healing Center’s two hyperbaric oxygen chambers will allow new opportunities for patients with slow healing, hard to treat wounds.

Being able to treat patients with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy is a huge advancement for our organization,” explains Dr. Carol Shapiro, Medical Director of Sentara Wound Healing Center, “This is an exciting technology and even in our short experience, we are already seeing results.”

In Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, patients receive daily treatments of 100% oxygen delivered under pressure. The purpose of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy is to promote healing in wounds which are stalling like, areas treated with radiation or because of a systemic disease, like diabetes. By breathing this 100% oxygen, wounds heal quicker, opening diseased or injured blood vessels.

For patients like Larry Boomer, an amputee and diabetic who has been fighting slow healing wounds for years, hyperbaric oxygen therapy has given him a new lease on life.

“In the short time I’ve been doing this treatment, my wounds have healed up so amazingly. I had surgery on my foot and had a wound which was open for six months. Now, within 34 days, the wound is just about completely closed. I’m just amazed!” says Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy patient, Larry Boomer.

“This advanced technology is an incredible addition to the community and the Sentara Wound Healing Center. It wouldn’t be possible without months of hard work by our dedicated team,” says Kathie Johnson, President, Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center.

The state-of-the-art Sentara Wound Healing Center brings together a diverse team of doctors and specialists who work with a patient’s own physicians to develop a customized treatment plan and provide expert care for hard to treat wounds.

“The addition of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy aligns with Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center’s mission and vision: to Improve Health Every Day and be the provider of choice for our community. The Sentara Wound Healing Center does this by elevating patient care and providing these important treatment options right in our patients’ own backyards,” says Johnson.

If you or a loved one has a wound that just won’t heal, don’t hesitate. Contact the experienced doctors, nurses and staff at the Sentara Wound Healing Center: 703-523-0660.

Updated: Verizon customers having problems calling 911 in Prince William

PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY — Have a cell phone on the Verizon network?

You won’t be able to use it to call 911 in Prince William County. When Verizon customers dial 911, the call doesn’t go through.

Instead, Verizon customers are urged to dial the county’s non-emergency number to get through to the 911 call center. That number is 703-792-6500.

A Manassas spokeswoman tells us the city is experiencing similar problems with Verizon users. All 911 calls to the city are processed through the county’s 911 call center. City residents are encouraged to call 703-257-8000 to report emergencies. 

We’ll post updates here when we get them.

Updated 1:30 p.m. 

The phone lines are now working like they’re supposed to, according to an email from Prince William police. 

However, if you’re still having issues dialing 911 from your Verizon cell phone, or a cell phone on any carrier, you’re encouraged to dial the county’s non-emergency number to reach the 911 call center. That’s 703-792-6500.

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