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Occoquan Local

Occoquan Spring Craft Show to feature live entertainment, handmade goods

From a press release: 

The Spring Occoquan Arts and Crafts Show will be held rain or shine on Saturday, June 2, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, June 3, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in downtown Historic Occoquan. A 49-year tradition, this award winning outdoor street festival features nearly 300 artisans and crafters, fun interactive activities for the kids, live entertainment and great food.

While you’re browsing the many one-of-a-kind arts, crafts, and handmade goods featured throughout the show, be sure to make time to stop by River Mill Park to watch the Ordway Conservatory perform and teach ballet to your young ones on Saturday or listen to local band Drive In Riot play your rock favorites on Sunday. In addition to performances at River Mill Park, Bob Culbertson, a skilled musician on the Chapman Stick, will perform at the show, singer/songwriter Matthew Mills will perform at Mamie Davis Park, and the Rockledge Assembly of English Country Dancers will perform throughout the event area. Be sure to head to the Mill House Museum for exciting, free events for the kids, too. Young visitors are welcome to explore a firetruck or take a turn at dunking a police officer. Kids will also want to have their face painted or get their very own balloon art with Fairy Jennabelle.

ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE

 

 

Saturday, June 2, 2018

 

11pm-4pm

Ordway Conservatory of Classical Ballet

River Mill Park

12pm-3pm

Matthew Mills, (Acoustic Guitar)

Mamie Davis Park

All Day

Bob Culbertson, (Chapman Stick)

Town Hall

All Day

Fairy Jennabelle Face Painting

Mill House Museum

All Day

OWL VFD Touch-a-Truck

Mill House Museum

All Day

Law Enforcement United Dunk Tank

Mill House Museum

All Day

VSP Distracted Drivers Simulation

Commerce Street

     
 

Sunday, June 3, 2018

 

12pm-4pm

Drive In Riot, (Southern Blues Rock)

River Mill Park

All Day

Bob Culbertson, (Chapman Stick)

Town Hall

All Day

Fairy Jennabelle Face Painting

Mill House Museum

All Day

OWL VFD Touch-a-Truck

Mill House Museum

All Day

Law Enforcement United Dunk Tank

Mill House Museum

All Day

VSP Distracted Drivers Simulation

Commerce Street

            Admission is free.  Off-site parking with shuttle bus service is available at the Workhouse Arts Center (9518 Workhouse Road), Lake Ridge Commuter Lot, Route 123 Commuter Lot, and the I-95 Commuter Lot. Please note that this year parking will NOT be available at the Vulcan Materials Lot.  There is a $5 round trip shuttle fee payable at the event drop-off; kids 12 and under ride free. Handicapped accessible parking is available in town.

            Funds generated by the semi-annual Arts and Crafts Show support the Town’s Capital Improvement Program, which includes maintaining, updating, and implementing infrastructure improvements, building maintenance, and other public improvements like streets, sidewalks, gaslights, stormwater, and more.

A sweet treat for two at Chick-fil-A Bristow: $5,000 in scholarship funds

For two Chick-fil-A employees, earning a combined $5,000 in scholarship money was sweeter than the milkshakes sold behind the counter. 
 

Kifer


Catherine Kifer, 19, and Lauren Purdue, 18, were awarded $2,500 each in scholarship funds by on Tuesday, May 8. The awardees’ parents looked on, and the patrons who filled the restaurant applauded. 
 
Kifer is the Drive-Through Coordinator with two years of experience working at the restaurant, and Purdue works the drive-through and

Purdue


front counter. 
 
The two co-workers applied together for the scholarships. Purdue, a soon-to-be graduate of Kettle Run High School in Fauquier County, came to Kifer, her supervisor, told her about the company scholarship and asked for a recommendation. 
 
“Wow, how do I write this,” said Kifer, who said it was the first time anyone had asked her for a letter for a recommendation. 
 
She wrote it, and and, then decided she, too, would apply. 
 
After putting in two years at Northern Virginia Community College, Kifer will use the funds to transfer to Messiah College, a small Christian school in Mechanicsburg, Pa. to study psychology. 
 
Purdue will attend Liberty University in Lynchburg in the fall where she plans to study early childhood education. She’s already spent time teaching small children at church while her father, a pastor, preaches from the pulpit. 
 
“Having Sunday’s off of work really helps,” said Purdue. 
 
The women will take with them to college some of the skills they’ve learned while working at Chick-fil-A. For Purdue, it’s her newfound communications skills that have allowed to her open up and meet new people. 
 
Kifer say’s she’s learned to multitasking while serving customers. 
 
“I can work a shift with 10 to 15 people under me, do an $11,000 lunch shift, help manage the front and work in the back,” said Purdue. “It’s taught me that if the professor is late to class, I’ll just take out my work and start doing it there on the desk while I wait.” 
 
Both students will be able to re-apply for more scholarship money from Chick-fil-A next year as long as they’re still employed by the company. Both students said they’d be back to work during college breaks and holidays. 
 
Kifer and Purdue’s parents joined their daughters at a special ceremony where Lovitt handed out the awards. He purposely used his booming voice to announce to his customers that filled the dining room of his employees’ accomplishments. 
 
Afterward, he served cake to not only the awardees but to every guest in the restaurant, too. 
 

JES Foundation Repair wins 2018 Fantastic Fifty Award

Five-time award winner credits growth to homeowner satisfaction

JES Foundation Repair was recently honored with a Fantastic 50 award for being one of the 50 fastest growing companies in Virginia. Since 1998, JES is one of eight companies in the state to achieve the award five times. The Fantastic 50 award program is organized and sponsored by the Virginia Chamber of Commerce.

“We’re humbled to be recognized alongside such outstanding Virginia companies” said Cary McGuckin, CMO. “It’s a testament to our employees who are always willing to go the extra mile and to the homeowners who put their trust in us.”

JES qualified for the 2018 Fantastic 50 list by growing over 200% from 2013 to 2016, the period measured by the Chamber to qualify.

“The growth of JES has been amazing,” said Matt Malone, CEO. “It’s the result of a hardworking, passionate team that truly believes in our mission to provide homeowners with the highest level of service and support.”

Malone joined the team as co-owner and managing partner in 2016, and is leading the continued growth throughout the eastern United States.

About JES Foundation Repair – JES Foundation Repair is a subsidiary of Groundworks, a family of companies that specialize in residential foundation repair, crawl space encapsulation, basement waterproofing, and concrete lifting. It is the nation’s largest foundation services company with the corporate office in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Groundworks is comprised of JES Foundation Repair, Tar Heel Basement Systems, Indiana Foundation Service, and Mount Valley Foundation Services. Celebrating 25 years in business, JES has helped over 70,000 homeowners since 1993.

JES Foundation Repair, together with the other Groundworks subsidiaries, operate out of eight offices that serve Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, West Virginia, Indiana, South Carolina, and Georgia. JES has been named to the Fortune 5000 Fastest Growing Companies, Virginia Chamber of Commerce Fantastic 50, Inside Business Roaring Twenty and Best Places to Work. For more information about JES Foundation Repair, please visit www.jeswork.com

About the Awards – Virginia’s FANTASTIC 50 award program is a signature event of the Virginia Chamber of Commerce. Now in its 23rd year, the FANTASTIC 50 program is the only annual statewide award recognizing Virginia’s fastest growing business.

Nominations for the 2018 FANTASTIC 50 were sought last fall from local chambers of commerce, economic development organizations, and through the sponsors’ networks; companies may also nominate themselves.

To be eligible, a company must be privately held with headquarters in Virginia, show revenues between $200,000 and $200 million, and demonstrate positive revenue growth and positive net income in its most recent fiscal year over the previous year. Companies are judged on four-year revenue history. The professional service firm Dixon Hughes Goodman verifies all award entries.

The Fantastic 50 award program is sponsored by the Virginia Chamber of Commerce, Cox Communications, Inc., Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP, Dixon Hughes Goodman, J.P. Morgan Chase, the Westfields Marriott, SunTrust Bank, Virginia Business Magazine and the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority.

About the Virginia Chamber of Commerce
The Virginia Chamber of Commerce is the largest business organization in the Commonwealth, with more than 26,000 members. The Chamber is a non-partisan, business advocacy organization that works in the legislative, regulatory, civic and judicial arenas to act as the catalyst for positive change in all areas of economic development and competitiveness for Virginia.

In December 2017, the Chamber released an update to its long-term strategic economic development plan, Blueprint Virginia 2025, which engaged over 6,000 business and community leaders to lay out a plan to getting Virginia back to the top of national business climate rankings. Learn more at www.vachamber.com.    

 

Hematology Oncology Associates of Fredericksburg expands to Stafford County

Hematology Oncology Associates of Fredericksburg (HOAF), a healthcare organization recognized for providing world-class cancer care in state-of-the-art facilities, is expanding its practice to a second location in Stafford County that will offer the same level of care and treatment for cancer patients across a wider range of the Northern Virginia region.

The 7,048 square-foot cancer care office, located at 125 Woodstream Boulevard in Stafford and scheduled to open on Monday, May 14, will be known as Hematology Oncology Associates of Fredericksburg at Stafford.

HOAF officials believe that the new location in Stafford County will have a positive impact on health outcomes throughout the Northern Virginia region by increasing access to cancer specialists and advanced cancer therapies.

“Many of the patients who currently come to our offices in Fredericksburg live in the rapidly-growing North Stafford area,” said Dr. Charles L. Maurer, president of HOAF. “We saw a need to help patients in Stafford County, as well as those in Prince William County and other localities along the I-95 corridor, stay closer to home for their appointments and treatments.”

When HOAF at Stafford opens, the six physicians in the Fredericksburg location will rotate to Stafford weekly. Also, there will be a dedicated nurse practitioner and staff to provide consistent, compassionate care for patients. The Stafford facility will offer the same leading-edge services that are available at the Fredericksburg office.

HOAF offers a full spectrum of comprehensive services to treat all forms of adult cancers. A snapshot listing of services includes:

• Hematology
• Medical Oncology
• Infusion
• Chemotherapy
• Iron Replacement
• Holistic Care
• In-house Physician Dispensary
• Surveillance Clinic

“By elevating the quality of care in North Stafford with our second location, we’re keeping patients and their families in the community,” said Dr. Maurer. “Our passion is our patients and we are deeply committed to supporting them every step of way on the journey to recovery.”

Dr. Maurer also noted that renovations to the existing office in Fredericksburg are underway, which will expand the research department and increase the size of the pharmacy, among other improvements. “These exciting initiatives align with HOAF’s long-term goals for future growth of the practice,” he concluded.

To learn more about HOAF and its capabilities for cancer care, visit hoafredericksburg.com.

Code strokes are more common than you think. That’s why Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center is going to bat to raise stroke awareness.

Being early is ideal for a lot of things, but it can be a game-changer when it comes to a stroke.

The American Heart Association estimates someone in the U.S. has a stroke nearly once every 40 seconds.

These numbers don’t surprise the doctors, nurses, and staff in the Emergency Department (ED) at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center. The ED is usually the gateway for Prince William County’s stroke patients.

“It’s an extremely rapid fire pace once a potential stroke patient arrives, time is brain,” explains Jessica Silcox, RN, MSN, ED Team Coordinator and founder of the hospital’s stroke team.

The team is just that and extends outside the hospital walls to Prince William County’s first responders.

“We look to Emergency Medical Services (EMS) as being the green light for the whole thing. They can let us know before a patient gets here what we can expect,” explains Silcox.

That’s when a CODE STROKE is called. It alerts the teams, within Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center, a possible stroke patient is on the way. In addition to the doctors and nurses in the Emergency Department, the alert signals to the teams in radiology (CAT scan) and a number of other departments, an emergent case is imminent.

“You lose two-million neurons a minute, so every minute, literally, does count when you’re talking about stroke,” says Silcox.

Time is of the essence when it comes to stroke. That’s why as soon as a stroke patient arrives at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center, a specially certified team of nurses, a stroke coordinator and a stroke facilitator instantly take that patient to get a CAT scan. It’s at that point telemedicine is incorporated for expedited care.

“We have a machine we bring into CAT scan and the tele-neurologist can actually log on, wherever they are, and visualize that patient. They do an exam, speak to that patient. The technology is actually pretty advanced,” explains Silcox. “The tele-neurologists have cameras they can zoom in to the point they’re looking into a patient’s pupil to do an exam. That way the neurologist can determine quickly, if that patient is eligible for a clot-busting medication, or if another therapy is necessary.”

That’s why education is vital. Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center, along with the Potomac Nationals, will be teaming up again this year for the Strike Out Stroke event.

“This event has been a huge success,” exclaims Kim Houser, RN, the new coordinator of the stroke team. “This is a huge community-based project to raise awareness and educate through a fun night. People can come out and support the community and those touched by stroke.”

This year’s event is happening on May 5 at Potomac National’s Richard Pfitzner Stadium.

Remember STROKE is an Emergency. Every minute counts. ACT F.A.S.T.

  • Face: Face drooping, Does one side of the face droop when smiling?
  • Arm: Arm Weakness, Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift down?
  • Speech: Speech Difficulty, Is speech slurred or strange?
  • Time: Time to Call 9-1-1. If you observe any of these symptoms, call 911 immediately.

Wood wins Dumfries: The results from Tuesday’s town elections in Prince William County

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This week is devoted to infertility awareness

For millions of women, it’s an issue they’re all too familiar with and it’s something they deal with every day.

April 22-28 is designated National Infertility Awareness Week. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate 1 in 8 couples have trouble conceiving, that’s 15% of American couples.

It’s something Dr. Richard Jenet, Chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Women’s Health Center at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center and practicing physician at About Women OB/GYN, sees too often.

“We often times have to really calm people down. People get really anxious if they try for one month and haven’t gotten pregnant,” he explains.

Dr. Jenet says when a patient comes to him wanting to start a family, he starts with the basics – getting blood work and taking both general and reproductive histories.

“We talk about some healthy life choices and have people try to get pregnant on their own. Unless there’s something obvious, we don’t talk about infertility until after a year of trying.”

Most couples get pregnant within that year, but if not, Jenet starts looking at other factors, “Several items are taken into account: age, weight, health conditions and lifestyle, just to name a few.”

If there are no obvious problems, Dr. Jenet says that’s when a reproductive endocrinologist is recommended to help pinpoint the issue.

But, Jenet says the advances in medicine, over his nearly 30 years in practice, allow women more alternatives than ever before, “There are more medications. There are more treatments. There are a lot more options.” And, that means more hope for women trying to get pregnant.

To learn more about OB/GYN or endocrinology services near you, call 1-800-SENTARA or go to sentara.com.

Roofing contractors in our region are backlogged thanks to March wind storm

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How an organ donation from a 25-year-old man gave Dan Nickloy as second-chance ‘miracle’ at life he’ll never forget

More than 115,000 men, women, and children sit on the transplant list, waiting for a miracle.

On average, 22 people die each day because the organs they need are not donated in time.  

Over the years, Diane Nickloy has cared for a number of those patients in her role as an Intensive Care Unit Nurse and Unit Coordinator at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center. But, it was almost four years ago, roles were reversed when Diane learned her husband, Dan was in desperate need.

“My husband got sick very quickly,” remembers Diane, “Our daughter was getting married in May of that year and decided we needed to get healthy so that we’d look good in our tux and our dress. Dan hadn’t been to the doctors in 15 years, so he said, ‘I’m going to make an appointment and go,’ and he did. While he wasn’t feeling sick or anything, the doctor discovered an atrial flutter or abnormal heart rhythm. From there, the doctor decided to do lab work as a precaution. When the labs came back days later, it showed Dan had an abnormal liver function.”

Dan, who was just 61 at the time, went from feeling a little tired to dealing with a major health crisis.

“Once I had my diagnosis, my disease progressed rapidly,” remembers Dan. “I learned very early that transplant was the only cure. My first thought was I was going to die early and I wasn’t ready. I had a lot to do in life and I was going to miss out,” he said.

That May, Dan was able to walk his only daughter down the aisle at her wedding, but soon after he was admitted to the hospital.

“I was getting sicker. I didn’t think I was ever coming home, and prepared to say my goodbyes,” he remembers. “Then, one night the doctor came in, put his hand on my shoulder and said, ‘Mr. Nickloy, we have a liver. Are you ready to go?’”

Dan says that today, July 17, 2014, marks a miracle and the second chapter in his life.  

The Washington Regional Transplant Community (WRTC) says that’s what it’s all about.

“Organ donation means lives saved!” explains Valerie Schneider, Media Relations and Communications Manager for WRTC, “For every organ donor, there’s the potential to save eight lives. For those waiting on the transplant list, there’s nothing more meaningful than the gift of life.”

In the DC metropolitan area, with thousands of people are on the transplant list, only about 67% of the adult population are registered as donors. One reason could be the myth that donors won’t receive the same level of care should they be injured or come to the hospital.

“When someone passes, they are evaluated by a highly skilled team to determine their donation capability. Nobody is ruled out for donation because of age, race, or social status; the medical evaluation determines the donation potential,” says Schneider.

The Nickloy family doesn’t know much about the person whose gift made Dan’s life possible, only that he was 25-years-old and killed in an automobile accident. While Dan has asked to meet the donor’s family, they haven’t taken him up on his request.

He just wants them to know how grateful he really is.

“I feel I was part of a miracle,” he says. “My only regret is I never got to meet the family who made the selfless act to donate their loved one’s organ in their time of grief, so I could live a better, fuller life.”

That fuller life includes the birth of his grandson, Brooks. While the donation of a liver, Dan wouldn’t have been alive to meet him.

It’s a gift he doesn’t take for granted.

“Today I feel great. I’m 65 and have more energy than I ever did. I have a positive outlook. I have changed my diet, I don’t smoke or drink. I don’t take a moment here on earth for granted. I make sure I spend time with family and friends, you never know what the future holds,” says Dan.

Dan also shares his experience with organ donation to raise awareness. He encourages people to become donors themselves.

“Organ donation is a gift to others that allows their life to go on. I want donor families to know that your generous decision to donate your loved ones’ organ will be received with dignity and respect.”

To learn more and to register to become a donor go to BeADonor.org.

Tour four beautiful homes at the Clifton Homes Tour for Charity

The Clifton Community Woman’s Club will host the 46th Annual Clifton Homes Tour and Silent Auction on Friday, May 18. Tour: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Silent Auction: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at the Clifton Presbyterian Church. Proceeds benefit the Club’s 501(c)(3) Charitable Trust and are distributed to local scholarships and charities.

The Tour offers guided tours of four beautiful homes in Clifton. Visitors can tour a farmhouse built in 1900 with furniture and antiques specific to Virginia. In another home, bold colors and true Williamsburg style combine to create a fun family atmosphere. A third home balances natural elements and 18th-century proportion. A fourth home is a Georgian hilltop manor with Virginia-made furniture and original artwork.

Free guided tours are offered for two historic churches: Clifton Baptist Church (1910) and Clifton Primitive Baptist Church (1871). Other events with free admission include a Silent Auction, Trinkets and Treasures, and wreath sale at the Clifton Presbyterian Church.

Tour tickets may be purchased in advance for $25 at local businesses: in Manassas at Flower Gallery; in Clifton at Adler’s Art & Frame, Belle Jar Design, and Hydrangea of Clifton; in Centreville at Banner’s Hallmark; in Burke at Five Star Hair, The Picket Fence, and The Yarn Barn; in Fairfax at Twinbrook Floral Design. Tickets are also available online for $30 at cliftoncwc.org or at Clifton Presbyterian Church (12748 Richards Ln, Clifton, VA 20124) the day of the tour.

Please visit cliftoncwc.org or contact Kay at kaygilbert@cox.net for more information.

We need a freelance community reporter

We’re seeking a freelance reporter who has a passion for community and who isn’t afraid to pick up the phone, use email, or dig on the web to get details.

Our ideal writer will be familiar with the Prince William County, Virginia region to include the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park.

They will be able to write about local government, schools, business, events and features.

Much if not all of the writing can be completed while working from home.

Experience gained while writing for a community news publication is preferred but not required.

Interested?

Send your resume, links to three of your best articles, and contact info to Uriah Kiser.

 

Win four tickets to see ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ to benefit Haymarket Regional Food Pantry

A special screening of Marvel’s new Avengers: Infinity War movie will be held on Thursday, April 26 — a day before the movie is released in theatres.

The special screening will benefit the Haymarket Regional Food Pantry.

Potomac Local subscribers have a chance to WIN a family-four pack of tickets to the show courtesy of Simple Luxuries Travel

From an email. 

I wanted to make you aware of a community event here in Manassas that is designed to help stock the shelves of the Haymarket Regional Food Pantry.

Simple Luxuries Travel is hosting a private, invitation-only preview screening of Avengers: Infinity War on April 26 at 7 p.m. in Manassas.

We would like to offer you a family 4-pack of tickets to giveaway to one of your viewers/subscribers. How you choose to pick the winner is at your discretion, we would just need the name and email of the winner to get them their tickets since all tickets to the event will be electronic.

With Disney releasing the Avengers and the Incredibles movies this year we want to use this superhero theme to reach out and encourage people to be their own superhero and help those families in need. Many people look at the holidays to help those fighting hunger but this need must be addressed each day for some families.

The screening will be held at Manassas Stadium 14 & IMAX, located at 11380 Bullock Drive near Manassas.

The winning Potomac Local subscriber will be notified via email on Friday, April 20.

Become a Potomac Local subscriber today!

Potomac Local Parent of the Month: Carrie

Potomac Local Parents is a monthly column that looks at life through the eyes of real parents. This month, we interview Carrie.

What time you do wake up?

5:45am

What are your children’s names and ages?

Four boys: Quentin 14, Christian 13, Xavier 10 and Brandon 7.

What’s the most difficult part about your morning routine?

Getting the kids out the door for school! It’s hardest to get the kids up in the morning (multiple attempts), share the bathroom (they lock their brothers out) and get them to bus stops on time. They have three separate bus stop times. Our mornings are chaos!

What is your morning beauty or grooming routine?

Shower. Luckily, I work from home.

Are you a coffee or tea person?

Coffee. If I’m lucky I can make a cup of coffee before I start work.  

What do you do once the kids are in school?

I have run a small daycare for the last sixteen years. I watch four kids, all two and three-year-olds.I have my first dropoff for childcare right after my oldest two leave. By the time my third and fourth go to school, I have all my daycare kids here.

What is the biggest challenge of trying to get work done – any work – with your schedule and responsibilities?

Lots! Juggling projects and activities for all the children. Having a 12-hour workday. All four of my sons play travel sports, too.

What do you wear during the work week?

Scrubs

What’s the craziest thing that happened to you so far this week?

I had a much needed, impromptu day off on Monday. I didn’t take off, but I had two kids on vacation for spring break, and the other two called out. It’s very rare! I went to the gym with my oldest two sons and took them out to lunch for some quality time.

Do you have pets?

Yes – two dogs, two cats and a rabbit, all rescues.

How do you get through the hard times?

Staying busy, organizing and lots of caffeine!

What’s your favorite color?

Lavender

What kind of car do you drive?

Mom minivan – Town and Country, and I love it!

If you could be any animal, what would you be and why?

Lion, because he’s king of the jungle.   

 

Sentara Heart & Vascular Center introduces new minimally invasive technique for atrial fibrillation

WOODBRIDGE — On Monday, April 2, 2018, Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center ushered in a new level of care with the introduction of left-sided pulmonary vein ablation. The Sentara Heart & Vascular Team, led by Dr. Aysha Arshad, Medical Director of Electrophysiology, performed the first of its kind procedure for the hospital.

“This is wonderful for our community,” says Dr. Arshad. “This means the beginning of more complex procedures in the Electrophysiology Lab here at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center, which opens up these vital services to members of our community. They won’t have to travel long distances for care because our highly experienced staff and physicians are the same that are working in all the top hospital centers in the area.”

Left-side pulmonary vein ablation or pulmonary vein isolation is used to treat Atrial Fibrillation, also known as AFib. AFib is a type of heart arrhythmia or irregular heartbeat that an estimated seven million Americans live with every day.

In atrial fibrillation, disorganized electrical signals originate in the heart’s upper chambers, or atria, causing the rhythm to be irregular. Because the contractions are not coordinated as in a normal heartbeat, the heart does not pump blood effectively to the rest of the body causing patients to experience a racing or quivering heartbeat, dizziness, shortness of breath and often feel tired.

People with AFib have a five times greater risk for stroke. 

After living with the condition for three-years, Woodbridge resident Claudia Warszawski, was looking for relief.

“I’m a very active 67-year-old. I walk three days a week at the mall and I just couldn’t keep up my pace. I’d have to stop and it was irritating,” said Warszawski.

After consulting with the grandmother of five and reviewing her history, Dr. Arshad shared she was a perfect candidate for the procedure. 

As the Electrophysiology program at Sentara Heart & Vascular Center has grown, so have the services. Left-sided ablation is the latest advancement of the program. In ablation, areas of tissue in the heart that cause arrhythmias are destroyed. 

“In left-sided procedures, where AFib comes from, it involves tackling circuits on the left side of the heart. There’s no natural passage to the left side of the heart, so we enter through a vein in the leg and travel to the chest where we make a tiny puncture in the interatrial septum with a small needle and pass a catheter through that tiny hole to the left side of the heart. From there we create a 3D map of the heart and get to the circuits that cause AFib,” explains Dr. Arshad.

After the procedure is completed and the catheter removed, the tiny hole heals on its own over the next four weeks. A chip, implanted in the chest at the time of the procedure, allows real-time monitoring of the patient.

“It’s the whole advent of real-time telemedicine,” explains Dr. Arshad, “The device will track her rhythm all day and at night transcribe it into a report, which will be emailed to me that evening. The device downloads all that data so I’ll know how she’s going to do long-term.”

As for Warszawski, days after her procedure she’s already feeling better, “This gives me a new lease to live the life I want before I was tired and always had heart palpitations and flutters. Now, I can’t even feel my heart beating, and that’s a good thing!”

If you’re experiencing a racing, fluttering, pounding or irregular heartbeat, don’t ignore those symptoms, find a healthcare provider at 1-800-SENTARA or Sentara.com to schedule your exam.   

Last call for entries ‘Help a Horse’ Day

From a press release: 

The Prince William County Animal Shelter’s annual “Help a Horse” Day is Sunday, April 29. To help observe this important day, the Animal Shelter is sponsoring an art contest for middle school students who live in Prince William County. This is the last call for entries!

The theme is “Horse Feathers,” and all artwork must include an equine animal and be the original work of the exhibitor. Computer-generated artwork is not accepted.

Entries are limited to 2- or 3-dimensional artwork. Colored pencil, ink, and crayon are the suggested materials. The minimum size of the artwork is 5”x7” – and it can be no larger than 11”x14”. Artwork must be framed and ready to hang. Each piece must have the exhibitor’s name, address and phone number secured on the back.

Please bring submissions with completed registration forms to the Prince William County Animal Shelter during normal operating hours. The Shelter’s address is 14807 Bristow Road, Manassas (20112). Entries will be accepted April 17-22. The artwork will be on display at the Shelter from Tuesday, April 24, through Sunday, April 29, and will be judged prior to the event, which starts at noon.

Ribbons will be presented for “champion” and “popular vote,” as well as first place through sixth place. Winning artwork will be displayed at the McCoart County Government Building from May 25, 2018, until June 1, 2018.

Contestants may pick up their artwork on April 29, between 4 and 5 p.m. All artwork, other than the winning entries, MUST be picked up by 5 p.m. Winning entries may be picked up from the Animal Shelter after June 6, 2018.

To see the 2018 contest guidelines, including the registration form, please visit the Animal Shelter website at www.pwcgov.org/animalshelter.

Chick-fil-A Bristow turns 9!

Chick-fil-A Bristow turns nine years old this week. Check out these other awesome anniversary week specials.

And, don’t miss the party coming this Saturday.

Chick-fil-A Bristow is located at 9939 Sowder Village Square in Manassas. It’s open 6 a.m to 10 p.m. and is closed Sunday.

And the Winners Are: Micron Technology, Inc., Tech Company of the Year

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Make downsizing a step up for the senior in your life

Seniors have specific challenges that we often don’t think about when we’re younger. One of those is downsizing. Often, after the kids are grown and have moved out or a larger home just becomes too much to manage, seniors opt for smaller living spaces. This transition can prove stressful for all concerned, but especially the senior homeowner. Here are some ways you can help ease that move from big to small.

Strategize – This is the first step after the downsizing decision is made. Think about reasons for downsizing and formulate goals with the senior homeowner. Reasons could include financial, accessibility, health, proximity to family, maintenance or something else. Set goals that match the reasons. Would a one-level, two-bedroom home three miles from the grandchildren work well if it had wheelchair accessibility? Or would a condo be a better option? Is assisted living the best choice? Don’t make any decisions before you have a strategy.

Bring in the pros – You have your expertise, and others have theirs. Get a team of professionals behind you to help ease the transition for everyone concerned. Start with a good real estate agent to help with selling and buying. Be sure the agent is familiar with senior moves and up-to-date on communities that support seniors. Ask people you trust for recommendations on lenders and moving companies that are experienced in downsizing.

Manage the process – As a loved one of the senior who is downsizing, it can be difficult to hand over the reins to someone else. But sometimes, it’s better to let a third-party oversee the details. Timing the move, changing over utilities, notifying doctors and others of the new address, organizing packing, etc. can become overwhelming. Consider hiring a transition specialist or moving manager to coordinate the many aspects that go into moving.

Get prepped – Downsizing isn’t just about packing and shipping, unpacking and organizing. It’s about acclimating to a life in a new setting. Help your senior loved one by preparing them for what to expect. Talk about emotions and concerns. Get a plan of the smaller home and draw out where belongings will go. This will help determine what needs to be given away, as well as help the senior homeowner adapt emotionally and physically.

Respect belongings Downsizing usually means you can’t keep everything, but that doesn’t mean everything should get tossed. Once you have helped your senior homeowner separate items into keep/give away/sell/throw away, pack what is going. Then ask your senior to give family members opportunity to take what they like. After, get ready to donate, but remember that selling some items could be a viable option, too. When it does come time to donate, be sure to let your senior help decide where.

Set up to settle in – Don’t let your senior move into chaos. Before they arrive to the new home on moving day, set up as much as possible. Make sure the main living spaces are inhabitable and recognizable, especially if there are memory issues. Put things in familiar arrangements and intuitive places. Make rooms attractive and practical. Remind your senior homeowner that they can rearrange things if they want so they feel comfortable but empowered.

Downsizing doesn’t have to be a depressing life event if handled correctly. A little planning, a lot of patience and tons of TLC will help you relocate your loved one to a place they can enjoy calling home.

This post is sponsored by Home Instead Senior Care, serving Prince William and Fauquier counties.

Sentara hernia surgery kept one man from missing his workouts and got him back to the gym, better than before…

Joshua Goad and his wife are always on the go.

“We are very active. I’ve got a sailboat, a kayak. We enjoy going to the gym and working out. It keeps us young,” says the 56-year-old, smiling.

It was during one of his usual workouts when something unusual happened.

“I was at the gym and overexerted myself lifting. At first, I didn’t think anything of it, but then, I started to notice a bulge near my groin region,” he recalls.

Like a lot of people, Joshua Goad thought the problem would fix itself and heal on its own until it didn’t. It was about this time, he started to realize he might have a hernia. 

“I would get to the point where I was lifting, exerting and I could actually feel it tightening up on my intestines, the intestine that was hanging out. At that point, I said, if I strangulate this thing, I could be in a world of trouble,” he says, remembering.

That’s when he made an appointment with board-certified, Sentara Medical Group surgeon, Dr. Steven Nakao. Dr. Nakao quickly diagnosed Joshua with an inguinal hernia.

Dr. Nakao says hernias aren’t that uncommon, “A hernia is when an intra-abdominal organ, or fatty tissue, protrudes through a muscle defect.  This can occur in numerous areas of the body, the abdominal wall, diaphragm and in the groin.  Patients can have a single hernia or numerous hernias at one time.”

While asymptomatic hernias can be observed for some time, Joshua and Dr. Nakao discussed the options and decided surgery would be best. That’s when Dr. Nakao shared with Joshua, he was a candidate for robotic surgery.

“We can tackle all types of hernias using this method. We can approximate the muscles due to the advances in technology and be able to sew easily in the abdomen and then place mesh, if appropriate, through the small incisions,” said Dr. Nakao. “So we get both a return of muscle function and repair of a hernia through small incisions.  This is great for both post-op pain and time off work.”

Joshua had his surgery at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center in December 2017. He says he suffered some discomfort those first few days after his procedure, but it wasn’t long until he was back to exercising.

“The weekend after my surgery, my wife and I went to the gym and I was pretty much able to do a limited workout,” says Joshua smiling.

Now, four months later, he says he’s doing better than ever before and doesn’t know why he waited so long.

“I couldn’t have asked for anything better, I was very confident in Dr. Nakao and his abilities. And, he and his team were very helpful. The whole process was smooth,” says Joshua.

And, he has this advice for people living with a hernia: “I should never have let it go for so long. I guarantee it (your hernia) will not get any better. What are you waiting for?”

You shouldn’t live in pain, that’s why Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center is hosting three, free hernia screenings over the next few months on the mornings of April 14 and May 19. The screenings are free, but you must register.

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