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This mindset guides our process and allows the FreshySites team to grow from within

The fourth part of the FreshySites Ethos is Grow From Within. We’re always open to welcoming new members to the FS team if we’re hiring. But once you’re on team Freshy, a lot is expected of you – because our clients expect a lot from our company.

The Freshy team is highly motivated, reliable, extremely organized, creative, collaborative and so much more.

As we’ve stated before, the FS team comes to work each day ready to serve the customer in any way possible, constantly looking for ways to help them and show them their value. This requires us to be ego free, always treating clients, and each other, with the utmost respect and kindness.

Our unity in these mindsets allows us to effectively ask for more in our daily process, pushing ourselves to be the best we can be, pushing FS forward as well. More than anything else, our asking for more lends itself to growing from within.

In order to push our company forward, our employees have to push themselves, each day, to be as thoughtful, efficient and productive as possible in their individual roles and responsibilities.

Having this mindset guide our process allows the FS team to effortlessly grow from within because our team members are consistently surpassing expectations – both internally and externally – growing their individual skills and capabilities, as well as our team’s collective talents and abilities.

Our team is constantly growing in our capabilities, skills, talents and so much more.

More importantly, though, our employees are growing individually, far beyond their official titles – from junior web designers into web designers for example – but in their responsibilities within the company, becoming even more productive, hard-working, incredible members of our team with each passing day.

FreshySites – a regionally focused company with national reach and operations, growing our team from within.

FreshySites is a fast-growing website design firm dedicated to creating beautiful websites, while consistently delivering best-in-industry customer service and support. Founded in 2011, FreshySites has quickly expanded into the largest in-house WordPress web design shop on the East Coast. Our Washington D.C. office was founded in 2012 by Vincent Consumano. With additional offices, we have the team, resources and tools to serve our local – and national – clients through website mockups, creative briefs, revision rounds, and Search Engine Optimization audits. FreshySites is determined to take our regional clients’ online presence to the next level, ultimately helping them to grow and thrive. Explore our website to learn more about us, see our portfolio of work and become a part of our client family today!”

House vote aims to disassemble ‘school-to-prison pipeline’

Capital News Service tells us the Va. House of Delegates doesn’t want year-long school suspensions, with some exceptions. Here’s the press release:

House OKs Limiting School Suspensions to 45 Days

By Kirby Farineau

Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Virginia students who break school rules may no longer face the possibility of a yearlong suspension under legislation approved by the House of Delegates to address what some lawmakers call the “school-to-prison pipeline.”

House Bill 1600, which passed 84-15 on Tuesday, would reduce the maximum length of a suspension from 364 days to 45 days. It is one of several measures lawmakers introduced in response to complaints that Virginia schools overreact to minor infractions – and sometimes charge students as criminals for transgressions that should draw a detention.

“At the end of the day, if our students are out of school, they’re not learning,” said the bill’s sponsor, Democratic Del. Jeffrey Bourne, who previously served on the Richmond School Board. “We should not continue to use access to education as a punishment and expect positive results.”

On its way toward passage, the bill was amended to allow school officials to impose a suspension of up to 364 days if “aggravating circumstances exist” or if the student is a repeat offender.

Del. R. Lee Ware Jr., R-Powhatan, said he historically had reservations about limiting schools’ options in disciplining students. However, he called HB 1600 “a responsible middle course.”

“It allows a considerable amount of latitude to educators with the responsibility of maintaining order in schools,” Ware said.

HB 1600 was among a slew of proposals introduced this legislative session to address how Virginia schools discipline students. In 2015, the Center for Public Integrity reported that Virginia has one of the highest rates in the nation for referring students to law enforcement. Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy, D-Prince William, has called the situation “the No. 1 civil rights issue of our modern time.”

Several of the bills never made it out of committee. They included:

  • HB 445, which sought to end a requirement that principals report certain misdemeanor crimes to law enforcement. The bill, proposed by Carroll Foy, was rejected in a 5-2 vote by a subcommittee of the House Courts of Justice Committee.
  • HB 296, which would have prohibited suspending or expelling students in preschool through third grade, except for violent crimes, drugs or other serious offenses. The House Education Committee voted 12-10 vote to kill the legislation. The bill was sponsored by the panel’s vice chairman, Del. Richard Bell, R-Staunton.

Del. Mark Cole, R-Spotsylvania, opposed Bell’s measure, saying it would “make our classrooms less safe.”

“I don’t think it’s up to us to try to micromanage discipline issues in the local schools. That’s why we have local elected school boards,” Cole said.

While such legislation met opposition in the House, the Senate has been more receptive.

On Thursday, the Senate Education and Health Committee approved SB 170, which, like Bell’s legislation, would bar suspensions and expulsions in third grade and below. The committee voted 11-4 in favor of the measure. SB 170, sponsored by Sen. William Stanley, R-Franklin County, now goes to the full Senate for consideration.

Last week, the Senate unanimously passed SB 476, sponsored by Sen. Bryce Reeves, R-Spotsylvania. Like Carroll Foy’s bill, it would give school principals the discretion not to call police on students who commit misdemeanors or other minor crimes.

Reeves’ measure has been assigned to the House Courts of Justice Committee – the same panel whose subcommittee killed Carroll Foy’s proposal.

Overnight lane closures eastbound I-66 inside Beltway continue through March

If you’re planning to drive at night on I-66, here’s what you need to know. VDOT brings us this update.

FAIRFAX– Single lane closures will continue on eastbound I-66 inside the Beltway during overnight hours (weather permitting) through the end of March from 9:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. each night. The closures will occur between I-495 and Fairfax Drive (Route 237) to allow crews to safely perform survey and geotechnical investigation work related to the I-66 eastbound widening project. Additionally, intermittent shoulder closures are planned (weather permitting) from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Motorists should expect delays and are advised to use alternate routes.

For specific dates, times, and locations associated with the lane and shoulder closures, and for real-time traffic information, please visit http://www.511virginia.org/.

The survey and geotechnical investigation work is needed prior to the start of construction that will add an additional through lane along four miles of eastbound I-66 between the Dulles Connector Road (Route 267) and Fairfax Drive (Exit 71) in Fairfax and Arlington counties. Other key project features include constructing a new bridge over Lee Highway for the Washington & Old Dominion (W&OD) Trail and providing direct access from eastbound I-66 to the West Falls Church Metro station by constructing a new ramp connection between two existing ramps (eastbound I-66 to Route 7 and the eastbound I-66 collector-distributor road adjacent to the station’s parking garage).

The additional lane will be open to traffic in fall 2020 and the overall project is expected to be complete in fall 2021. Find additional I-66 project information at http://inside.transform66.org/.

Updated: Help Prince William County Police Department find missing, endangered adult

From the Prince William police February 7, 2018 press release:

*MISSING ENDANGERED ADULT: The Prince William County Police Department is asking for the public’s help in locating a missing and endangered adult, Christopher Luke AMMEN.  The investigation revealed Christopher walked away from his residence located in the 5800 block of Anthony Dr in Woodbridge around 8:00PM on February 6. Christopher left his residence voluntarily and may be in need of assistance which qualifies him as being endangered. Anyone with information on this person’s whereabouts is asked to call Prince William County police at 703-792-6500 or your local police department.

Christopher Luke AMMEN is described as a white male, 29 years of age, 5’08″, 215lbs with brown eyes and brown hair.

He was last seen wearing a black baseball hat, navy blue sweatshirt, blue jeans, and black shoes.

UPDATED February 8, s018

From the Prince William police:

*UPDATE: Christopher Luke AMMEN, who was reported as missing and endangered on February 7, has been located and is safe.

Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center gets heart healthy, urges people to ‘Know Your Numbers’

Heart disease is the number one cause of death in women.

The American Heart Association says 1 in 3 women dies from the disease, and that’s why February is American Heart Month.

Sadly, the news isn’t surprising to Dr. Aysha Arshad, Medical Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center, “Women are often busy with day to day tasks, taking care of others, taking care of their family. They neglect their own health until things become much worse for them.”

Every day, Dr. Arshad sees women who have heart issues which haven’t been addressed, “The data for heart failure and women who suffer heart attacks show they come in much sicker and they’re much more difficult to treat because they’ve let so much time lapse.”

Part of the issue is women’s heart attack symptoms can differ from men’s, “They may not have crushing chest pains, they may have jaw or neck pain. Or maybe, be a little sweaty. Or perhaps, have a difference in exercise capacity,” explains Dr. Arshad.

The sooner a woman is diagnosed, the sooner treatment can begin.

Dr. Arshad says knowledge is power and offers this advice, “Recognize the early symptoms for heart disease, be a good advocate for your own cardiovascular health, follow up with your doctor should you develop any of those symptoms and know there are newer technologies that have developed that are simpler, more efficient and cosmetically better.”

Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center is helping people in their mission to be heart healthy, to do that, we’re inviting people to “Know Your Numbers.” Individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are more likely to have high cholesterol, high blood pressure and be overweight. Knowing your numbers is a crucial step in assessing your risk of developing heart disease, as many times there are no symptoms. This event includes complimentary screening of blood pressure, calculation of body mass index (BMI,) measurement of cholesterol and HbA1c levels (blood sugar) and an optional, pocket EKG screening is available for $20.

Registration is required. To register, call 1-800-SENTARA.

Social Security card in tatters? You might be able to get a replacement online.

The DMV has announced a new system to order replacement Social Security cards. Here’s the press release:

New Service Allows Virginians to Replace Social Security Cards Online

More than 10,000 Benefit from DMV Partnership with SSA in First Quarter

 RICHMOND – Virginians may now be able to order a replacement Social Security card online, thanks to a partnership between the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and the Social Security Administration.

Previously, citizens who needed to replace their Social Security card had to gather the required documents and complete an application in person at a Social Security office or submit the application and documents by mail. Now, Virginians who meet a few basic requirements, and have a state-issued driver’s license or identification card, may simply visit ssa.gov to submit their application online. Social Security compares the submitted information with DMV and other records and, upon verification, mails the customer a new card.

More than 10,000 Virginians were served in the partnership’s first four months. Twenty-four states and the District of Columbia also participate.

“We are always looking for opportunities to partner with other government agencies to offer new conveniences to Virginians,” said DMV Commissioner Richard D. Holcomb.

“We worked with the Virginia Department of Health to offer vital records in our 75 customer service centers and four mobile offices. Many of our offices offer E-ZPass through a partnership with the Virginia Department of Transportation. And, in cooperation with the Transportation Security Administration, Virginians can apply for TSA Pre?® and the Transportation Worker Identification Credential at eight DMV locations across the Commonwealth. It only makes sense that we would work with SSA to enable Virginians to securely replace Social Security cards online.”

U.S. citizens who reside in Virginia and are 18 or older can visit ssa.gov to create a My Social Security account in order to request a Social Security card replacement online. Participants must have a U.S. domestic mailing address and a valid driver’s license or identification card, and must not need to change their name or make other record revisions.

 

Celebrate Black History Month with Prince William County Historic Preservation

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There is a rich legacy of African American history in Prince William County. The Prince William County Historic Preservation Division takes great care in researching and interpreting the stories that speak about African American experiences throughout this region.

The history of Lucasville is one such story about a strong African American community that developed in our area after the Civil War. The strength and determination of this community of about 100 people, is evident with the legacy left by the Lucasville schoolhouse.  Approved in 1883 and built in 1885, construction paid by the Prince William County School Board, costs totaled $267.13.  The school operated from 1886 to 1926, although attendance waivered through the years, a commitment to keeping the school open demonstrated their belief in the value of an education.

During this same time, Frederick Douglass was one of the most prominent African Americans in the county; he too valued the power of education.  Douglass said, during his keynote speech for the opening of the Manassas Industrial School, “To found an educational institution for any people is worthy of note; but to found a school in which to instruct, improve and develop all that is noblest and best in the souls of a deeply wronged and long-neglected people, is especially noteworthy.”

There are many opportunities for visitors to learn and experience something unique during the month of February, from visiting the historic school to the Ben Lomond slave quarters. You can join us as we celebrate African American History Month, February 10 at Lucasville School, where we will share stories about the Lucasville community and celebrate the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial.

The Ebenezer Men’s Choir will kick off the celebration with song and the youth group will follow, reading aloud passages from an 1894 Frederick Douglass speech.  Prince William County Historic Preservation Division will also give away one special editionNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass to each family in attendance with schoolchildren, while supplies last.

Later in the month, you are welcome to join us for an exclusive opportunity to spend the night in an original slave quarter, where historians and interpreters will share stories about the people who lived at Ben Lomond, how they worked to survive and to resist.  

If you would rather not spend the night, you might enjoy a day program, where visitors can explore the historic home and original slave quarter, learning about the enslaved population at Ben Lomond in the years before the Civil War.

The Slave Quarter at Ben Lomond is one of only three to survive in Prince William County today! Reservations are required as space is limited. For more information on these events, please visit pwcgov.org/history or call 703-367-7872.

3 things to do to get your business recycling plan going: ‘When you don’t recycle – you pay’

China, the biggest buyer of recyclable materials, notified the World Trade Organization (WTO) that it would be imposing a ban on the import of a broad range of recyclable materials including plastic, waste paper, and textiles from 2018. As the primary exporter of recyclable materials to China, the United States will be hit hardest by the ban.

 “Wishful” and “dirty” recycling reduces the value of the commodity household recycling becomes once it is collected. Many people throw more than they should into their recycling containers because they think “the hauler will sort it at the facility,” and so they don’t feel the need to be extra cautious about how they sort.

When the average person looks at their recycling bins, they don’t see a $117 billion industry or make the connection that the simple act of sorting plastic, cardboard, paper and cans supports over 500,000 jobs in the U.S., which in turn sustains many other local businesses and services that communities rely on.

In a recent report published by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, recycling in the City of Manassas has created 347 jobs and provides an estimated $80 million to our local economy.

The economic impact does not end there. The disposal cost for trash is $60 per ton.

By diverting cardboard, hard plastics and paper from the waste stream, businesses can reduce their waste disposal costs while supporting the local economy. The City of Manassas has public cardboard disposal dumpsters located behind Harris Pavilion, behind Taps and Apps and at Public Works – so you can dispose of your recyclables for free!

If you don’t believe there is a value to recycling, think again. When you don’t recycle – you pay.

Start your business recycling by doing three simple things:

  • Pick one recyclable (cardboard, paper, hard plastic, cans)
  • Set your recycling container in an easy to find location
  • Let your customers and staff know that you recycle

The City of Manassas is working in partnership with our contractors and other regional jurisdictions to develop policies and outreach information that clearly explains recycling requirements and improves public understanding of the economic and environmental consequences of recycling contamination.

Call Monica Boehringer on (703) 257-8256  or send an email to: mboehringer@manassasva.gov for more information and assistance with your business recycling needs.

1 bedroom condo for rent in Occoquan

I have a 1 bedroom condo for rent. $1100 per month. Mention this post on Potomac Local to get all utilities included. It’s located in Occoquan Ridge just outside of Occoquan. Close to VRE, I95 & 123 perfect for a young professional. Absolutely no smoking. It’s on the bottom floor of a 4 level building so it has a separate entrance, a small patio and “yard” that is away from all the others. Please email val6466[at]gmail.com if you’re interested.

‘Hey teens – great volunteer job for Spring Break with I CAN Bike’

Good Morning Prince William – Mark your calendars for Saturday February 10th for our Volunteer Recruitment Fair at Manassas Mall from 11am-2pm. We have over 25 local agencies attending that can inform you of their volunteer opportunities to make the best use of your time, talent and passion. We’ll be at the Macy’s Court so come on by!

· CASA Children’s Intervention Services is looking for volunteer advocates to represent a child suffering from abuse or neglect right here in our community. This is a very special volunteer job! Come to their next volunteer information session on Wednesday February 28th from 6-7pm at the offices of Imagine in Old Town Manassas- 9415 West Street to learn about this job and the extensive training afforded to you. Please call Suzanne at (703) 330-8145 or via email:smitchell@casacis.org to learn more.

· Habitat for Humanity is gearing up for their next project in Gainesville at the home of a veteran starting in 2 weeks. This project involves repairs to wall, insulation, plumbing lines and fixtures, floors, trim, windows and doors so this gentleman doesn’t face costly zoning violations. He stood up for and now it’s time for us to help him. Please visit their website to learn more and sign up to volunteer at: habitatpwc.org

· SERVE in Manassas needs Spanish Speakers! To help with client intakes for food assistance. Duties include review and update client files, help families with registration forms for assistance, and other admin duties. Come help at any of the following shifts: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays 9-11:30am or 12:30-3:30pm, Wednesdays 9am-12 noon or 4-7pm and Fridays 9-11:30am. Please call Navara at (571) 748-2536 or via email at:ncannon@nvfs.org to learn more

· Hey teens – great volunteer job for Spring Break with I CAN Bike- volunteers 15 years old + are needed to help with their camp March 26-30th at Colgan Senior High School. Duties include providing physical, emotional and motivational support to kids with Autism learning to ride a bike. Please call Jennifer or Yukiko at (571) 989-3618 or via email at: pwcicanbike@gmail.com

· Macy’s Clothing Closet needs your help to organize donated clothing for the residents of both the SERVE Shelter in Manassas and the Hilda Barg Shelter in Woodbridge. It’s a great way for you to give a little piece of mind to shelter residents who arrive with literally the shirt on their back. Call Julie at (571) 748-2674 or visit their website at: nvfs.org to learn more.

· The Lutheran Church of the Covenant in Dale City wants to pack 30,000 meals for Rise Against Hunger on March 10th. Super fun, family friendly event to help those less fortunate. You can choose either morning or afternoon shift. Please visit: www.whatsupwoodbridge.com for the link to register.

· Project Mend-A-House is now registering participants for their Live Well Workshops. This chronic disease self-management program meets at the Manassas Senior Center on Thursday mornings. Please call Martha at (571) 264-8559 to learn more.

· The Young Center is looking for adult volunteers to be child advocates for unaccompanied immigrant children. The next training is March 3rd and 4th to give you all the tools needed for the child’s immigration process and their life in general. Please email: tkitchen@theyoungcenter.org to learn more.

· First Tee of Prince William County promises spring is right around the corner so volunteers are needed to teach kids the fundamentals of a good golf swing. Come join the fun of sharing the game of golf with kids while also sharing dealing with life’s issues. Please call Alan at (703) 792-8064 to learn more.

· People Incorporated is looking for volunteer tax preparers willing to be certified as an IRS VITA Income Tax Preparer for the 2018 tax season. This special tax preparer assists low-income individuals and families with tax preparation at Saint James Episcopal Church, 73 Culpeper Street in Warrenton. Training is required, but you will be helping this vulnerable population navigate through their tax forms and IRS regulations. Volunteer Greeters are also needed to welcome those who visit the site, distribute forms, and create a pleasant atmosphere for the clients. For more information, please call Jeanne at (571) 445-3020 or email jhaley@peopleinc.net.

· The good folks at ACTS are in need of volunteer groups (large and small) who can help with various facilities projects such as grounds work, painting and helping their shelter create more space. Volunteers must be at least 16, and this is family friendly! Please contact Tamika at tmartin2@actspwc.us to learn how you can support this agency’s programs.

· The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program is in urgent need of volunteers age 55+ to teach 4th grade children the life skills to keep them safe alone and safe at home. Volunteers must be available during school hours. This fun curriculum is very interactive and of course the kids are very fun. Training is provided; please call Jan to learn more at (571) 292-5307 to be part of the RSVP team.

· SERVE Shelter is in need of small volunteer groups (6-8) who can prepare and serve a meal to their shelter residents in February and March. Volunteers must be at least 18 years old. Meals needed are February 19 (President’s Day) dinner, March 3rd dinner, March 4th brunch, March 11, 17, 25 and 31 all need dinner. Groups have the option to prepare food offsite and deliver, or bring ingredients and prepare and serve onsite in the shelter kitchen. Please contact Julie at jrmartinez@nvfs.org for more information on how to provide the homeless with a delicious, home-cooked meal.

If you are looking for other opportunities, please don’t forget to call my wonderful team at Volunteer Prince William. Jan can help you with the Retired and Senior Volunteer (RSVP) opportunities at (703) 369-5292 ext. 1, Shelley can help with any individual or group projects and send you weekly updates if you’d like. Shelley is at (703) 369-5292 ext. 0, and Bonnie can help you with opportunities available in Disaster Preparedness at (703) 369-5292 ext. 3. Please visit our newly re-vamped website at www.volunteerprincewilliam.org. Thanks so much for all you do in our community.

Call to Action is a column written by Volunteer Prince William Director Mary Foley.

Prince William County Arts Council promotes all art in the Greater Prince William County Area

The arts are alive in Prince William County! Yes, Prince William County has a rich tradition of promoting the arts. Although there are many options for your time, the culture and tradition of the arts are a sure bet in entertaining and providing many hours of enjoyment for you, your family, and friends.

So where can you find a complete list of art and art-related programs in Prince William County?  If you are like most people, when you have a question like the one posed, you immediately click onto Google or simply ask Siri.

Google “art in Prince William County” and the first entry that comes up is the Prince William Arts Council. What exactly does this council do, and how do they promote art in Prince William County?

Here is the short answer: The Prince William County Arts Council (PWCAC) is a membership organization serving the Greater Prince William Area, including Prince William County, Manassas, and Manassas Park. The vision of the Prince William County Arts Council is to be the go-to resource for the local arts.

The Arts Council provides year-round programming in performance and cultural arts, representing both professional and amateur endeavors. The council provides networking, development, and marketing opportunities for members. Membership includes non-profit and for-profit arts organizations, individual artists, civic groups, and businesses that support the arts in Prince William County.

The Prince William County Arts Council is a division of the Prince William County Department of Parks and Recreation.  Terraya Lewis is the Arts Recreation Specialist for Parks and Recreation. She acts as the liaison between the advisory group of volunteers and members representing the Arts Council and Parks and Recreation.  

“My role is to support the mission of both entities and to guide the Prince William County Arts Council through the necessary procedures so it can function as a County-funded program.  I am personally not a member; however, I am beyond inspired by the vibrant, lively, blending of music, dance, literature, visual design, and theatre right here in Prince William County,” Lewis explains.

Amelia May, Chair of the PWCAC Board of Directors shares her love of the arts and her expertise with members and fellow board members at the monthly meetings. “This council is just like the arts here in Prince William County: we are both thriving. My fellow board members are volunteers, like me, and we are thrilled to celebrate the arts in our community,” May shares.

In addition, the Prince William County Arts Council also hosts two events every year:

Arts Alive!

The Kathleen K. Seefeldt Awards for Arts Excellence

Every fall, the Hylton Center for the Performing Arts is the setting for the Arts Alive! This annual festival features various art forms from chorale and opera singers, to actors and Poets Laureate, who share their talents, and promote art throughout all areas of the County. There is literally something for everyone.  Best of all, admission is free and includes hands-on art-related activities for kids of all ages!

Established to recognize artists, arts organizations, volunteers, educators, and businesses in Prince William County, Manassas, and Manassas Park, the Kathleen K. Seefeldt Awards for Arts Excellence provide prestigious recognition on behalf of Seefeldt’s legacy of public service and support for the cultural arts. Community supporters and municipal officials present winners of each category including dance, theater, music, literary, and visual arts organizations.

Check out the PWCAC website at pwcartscouncil.org and see why the Prince William County Arts Council is the resource for the local arts.

Once a Radio City Rockette, no slowing for this soon-to-be 93-year-old 

  • SNVMC
  • Address: 2300 Opitz Blvd, Woodbridge, VA 22191
  • Phone: 703-523-1000

Lenore Beetar isn’t like most 92-year-olds.

Her life has always been about movement, grace and energy, qualities vital to a dancer. For four years, from 1944 to 1948, Beetar was a Radio City Rockette.

But, over the summer, her daughter, Lenore Reeves, noticed her once lively mother was suddenly acting differently.

“I just knew something was wrong because she wasn’t being herself. I kept saying to her, ‘You’re so out of breath. You don’t have any energy. There’s something wrong here.”

That’s when she took her mother to see a doctor, who put her on a heart monitor. The monitor showed Beetar’s heartbeat was dropping, explaining some of her recent symptoms. Beetar was referred to Electrophysiologist, Dr. Aysha Arshad.

Electrophysiology is a subspecialty within cardiology where doctors train in rhythm disorders and how to fix them. Often these disorders are corrected with an implant device, most commonly known as a pacemaker.

“Pacemaker is a device that can help patients with a low heart rate. It can also help in patients with alternating slow and fast heart rates where medicines may be needed, which can aggravate the slow heart rhythm. So, a pacemaker would stabilize a heart rhythm in that circumstance,” explains Dr. Arshad.

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Dr. Arshad explained to the family the benefits of a pacemaker. The workings of the device weren’t foreign to them since a close relative had one, but Reeves’ worried her mother’s memory issues could cause problems with recovery. That’s when they started exploring the Micra Pacemaker, the world’s smallest pacemaker, as an option.

It’s something many of Dr. Arshad’s patients are pursuing.

“It’s a miniaturized device containing revolutionary new technology. It’s delivered directly into the heart and cosmetically appealing since there’s no scar. The device itself is as small as a vitamin pill.”

For Lenore Beetar and her family, the recovery time and limited restrictions were key. Beetar spent one night in the hospital before being released. Her daughter says the results were instantly noticeable.

“She had the energy she hadn’t had in three months, it was unbelievable! It made an immediate difference.”

As for the soon-to-be 93-year-old, she barely knows the device is there. “I feel fine. I don’t even think about it! If you asked me about it, I’d say, ‘Oh, I think I have it,’” she shares chuckling.

Reeves recommends the device to everyone, sharing her mother has had little discomfort. Beetar agrees, “I didn’t feel anything!”

“There was no pain, no tenderness. They went in through the groin, it was a couple of stitches and some light bruising. It was very simple from a patient standpoint,” adds Reeves.

It’s been just three months, but already Beetar is back to her vivacious self. And, on a recent shopping trip, she was able to keep searching for deals, just like the old days.

“The procedure was a no-brainer for us,” says Reeves, “It gave my mom her quality of life back.”

Dr. Arshad reminds women their heart disease and heart attack symptoms may be different than men’s. While men are known to have crushing chest pains, women may have jaw or neck pain. They may be sweaty, or like Beetar, have a difference in exercise capacity.

If you’re experiencing chest pains, seek immediate medical attention. To find an Electrophysiologist or Cardiologist who’s right for you, contact 1-800-SENTARA or find a provider at sentara.com.

‘Acting with an air of arrogance is not the FreshySites way’

“Be Ego Free” – the second part of the FreshySites Ethos.

This mantra flows seamlessly from the first component of our Ethos Serve the Customer.

As we said in our previous post, without the members of our client family, we wouldn’t be here. We always strive to impress upon our clients that they’re our top priority through making customer service and support best practices an integral part of the FS process.

Being ego-free is another way we effectively serve each and every one of our customers.

Whenever we’re collaborating with one another, and with clients, each one of us makes a concerted effort to treat whoever we’re working with the utmost respect and kindness, always making them feel comfortable and valued.

Acting with an air of arrogance is not the FreshySites way.

Everyone on our team, as well as each one of our clients, has something to offer. We value the differences in our team members’ skills and abilities because it makes us stronger as a unit and better able to serve our various clients’ different needs.

We’re confident in our individual team member’s talents and abilities, as well as our team’s collective skills and capabilities.

However, we recognize that we’re not perfect. Though we may be experts in certain fields, there is always more to learn – from each other and from our clients.

Being ego-free is an essential part of that, as well as ensuring the business-to-client relationship is both respected and trusted.

You couldn’t trust us to take your business or organization’s message and effectively communicate it to the public through a beautiful website if you felt like we didn’t listen to your input because we thought ours was better.

At FresySites, you’ll never feel like that. Once you’re a member of the FS client family, you and your input will always be valued first and foremost.

FreshySites – a regionally focused company with national reach and operations, dedicated to serving our clients through being ego-free.

FreshySites is a fast-growing website design firm dedicated to creating beautiful websites, while consistently delivering best-in-industry customer service and support. Founded in 2011, FreshySites has quickly expanded into the largest in-house WordPress web design shop on the East Coast. Our Washington D.C. office was founded in 2012 by Vincent Consumano. With additional offices, we have the team, resources and tools to serve our local – and national – clients through website mockups, creative briefs, revision rounds, and Search Engine Optimization audits. FreshySites is determined to take our regional clients’ online presence to the next level, ultimately helping them to grow and thrive. Explore our website to learn more about us, see our portfolio of work and become a part of our client family today!”

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