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Vikings will invade Manassas on May 12

MANASSAS — The first-ever Manassas Viking Festival will be held on the lawn of the Manassas Museum from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 12.

From a press release:

AThe Manassas Viking Festival is a fun filled family oriented cultural and educational event hosting several Viking reenactment groups who will set up life history camps on the Manassas Museum lawn to demonstrate daily life during the Viking era. This will include iron work, tool making, wood carving, cooking, working with wool, period fighting and games for the entire family.

Leif Ericson a 40 ft Viking ship will be located by the Manassas Museum lawn thanks to a generous contributor to the event.  The ship is owned by Leif Ericson Inc and is being hauled down I-95 from its home in Philadelphia.

Representatives from the Raptor Conservancy of Virginia will be onsite with several of their falcons and hawks. Icelandic horses from FRIDA Icelandic Riding Club and Icelandic sheep and Icelandic chickens from Thee Bags Full on the lawn as well as Norwegian Fjord horses.

 The Crossjacks will provide lively Celtic music throughout the day. Lots of authentic Viking era vendors will be located in both areas. The Nordic Dancers of Washington D.C, “Sporið” Icelandic folk dancers and local dancers from the PhoenixIrish Dancers Academy are among entertainers at the pavilion. 

Local restaurants will offer Nordic fare and other refreshments. We encourage people to dress up in their Viking best and come down and have fun with us. There will be plenty of photo ups so be sure to bring your camera.



This week is devoted to infertility awareness

For millions of women, it’s an issue they’re all too familiar with and it’s something they deal with every day.

April 22-28 is designated National Infertility Awareness Week. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate 1 in 8 couples have trouble conceiving, that’s 15% of American couples.

It’s something Dr. Richard Jenet, Chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Women’s Health Center at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center and practicing physician at About Women OB/GYN, sees too often.

“We often times have to really calm people down. People get really anxious if they try for one month and haven’t gotten pregnant,” he explains.

Dr. Jenet says when a patient comes to him wanting to start a family, he starts with the basics – getting blood work and taking both general and reproductive histories.

“We talk about some healthy life choices and have people try to get pregnant on their own. Unless there’s something obvious, we don’t talk about infertility until after a year of trying.”

Most couples get pregnant within that year, but if not, Jenet starts looking at other factors, “Several items are taken into account: age, weight, health conditions and lifestyle, just to name a few.”

If there are no obvious problems, Dr. Jenet says that’s when a reproductive endocrinologist is recommended to help pinpoint the issue.

But, Jenet says the advances in medicine, over his nearly 30 years in practice, allow women more alternatives than ever before, “There are more medications. There are more treatments. There are a lot more options.” And, that means more hope for women trying to get pregnant.

To learn more about OB/GYN or endocrinology services near you, call 1-800-SENTARA or go to sentara.com.

Roofing contractors in our region are backlogged thanks to March wind storm

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Meet Linda Saylor of Manassas and Brigitte Bombardier of Woodbridge. They are Puppy Raisers for Guiding Eyes for the Blind.

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Two new exhibits open at the Manassas Museum

Two very different stories are being told this month at the Manassas Museum

The first is about how the Boys and Girls Club has worked to make an impact on the city. 

The second is the story behind one of the city’s most recognizable residences, Annaburg Manor.

From a press release: 

Expanding Boundaries

The Expanding Boundaries exhibit at the Manassas Museum looks at the impact the Manassas Boys and Girls Club has on our community and the children it serves. Through its focus on academic success, good character and citizenship, and promoting healthy lifestyles, the Club fulfills its mission to help boys and girls of all backgrounds, especially those who need them most, acquire the skills needed to become productive, civic-minded, responsible adults.

Living the American Dream

The Living the American Dream exhibit at the Manassas Museum tells the story of German immigrant Robert Portner, the Washington, D.C. beer baron. He was an entrepreneur, a philanthropist and a Manassas resident.

It was while visiting the Mathis family in Manassas that Robert Portner, founder of Alexandria brewery Tivoli, decided to purchase property and build Annaburg, a legendary summer retreat named for his wife Anna, that still stands on Maple Street in the City of Manassas.

He considered the 1892 house—with its 35 rooms and electricity his escape from the city. Robert Portner was also the inventor of the first mechanical air conditioning system.

Both of these exhibits are free to the public. The Manassas Museum is open Tuesday – Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and seven days a week beginning Memorial Day weekend.

Annaburg Manor has long been owned by Prince William Hospital, which today is owned by Novant/UVA Health System. Earlier this year, the health system abandoned plans for providing healthcare services at the aging manor property and decided to sell the land.

County ready to pay for Neabsco dredging. But the creek will need routine deepening to stay viable.

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