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News
Tscherch was a decorated Marine with three deployments to Iraq

QUANTICO — We’ve learned that Lt. Col. Kevin Tscherch was a decorated Marine with three deployments to Iraq.

Tscherch was found dead at Quantico Marine Corps Base early last week after police reported him missing from his Stafford County home.

NCIS is investigating Tscherch’s death and has released few details in the case.

We do know Tscherch was promoted to his rank of Lieutenant Colonel on May 1. He joined the Marine Corps in March 1991.

Tscherch was most recently assigned Headquarters and Service Battalion on base which, among other things includes working on suicide prevention efforts, as well as working with Marines who are leaving the corps, awaiting disciplinary action, or hospitalized.

Tscherch served three tours of duty in Operation Iraqi Freedom from February to September 2003, August 2004 to March 2005, February to August 2006.

He also had these honors:

-National Defense Service Medal (x2)
-Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
-Presidential Unit Citation
-Iraq Campaign Medal (x2)
-Navy Unit Commendation
-Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation (x2)
-Humanitarian Service Medal
-Joint Meritorious Unit Award
-Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
-Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (x3)
-Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (x3)
-Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (x3)
-Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal (x3)
-Global War on Terrorism Service Medal

News
Tscherch reported missing, found dead on Quantico

QUANTICO — A man who was reported missing over the weekend was found dead at Quantico.

Kevin Tscherch, 48, was found on the Marine Corps Base, according to a Prince William County Police Department spokesman.

Tscherch went missing at noon on Sunday from his home on Savannah Court in Stafford County. It’s unclear what led to his death.

Prince William police say the NCIS is investigating his death.

On Sunday, police said Tscherch might be in the area of Quantico Marine Corps Base. They added he might be in need of assistance, which would qualify him as a missing endangered person.

We’ll update this post with new information once we have it.

November is American Diabetes Management Month

November is American Diabetes Management month and with more than 30 million people living with diabetes in the United States, it’s no wonder. The American Diabetes Association estimates at least seven million of those people, don’t even realize they’re living the disease. Health organizations, and those working within the field, say the disease has reached epidemic portions. It’s something the Sentara Diabetes Management Program team sees every day.

“The numbers are increasing, both type 1 and 2 are on the rise,” says Registered Nurse and Certified Diabetes Educator Robyn Johanson, “It is a chronic, lifelong illness that really requires the person to learn the skills to self-manage their diabetes. And with that, they need a lot of ongoing support and the necessary tools to do that successfully.” Diabetes can be confusing to understand. When you eat, your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. At that point, your pancreas is supposed to release insulin.  Insulin serves as a “key” to open your cells, to allow the glucose to enter — and allows you to use the glucose for energy. But with diabetes, this system does not work.

“Diabetes is a problem with your body using the sugar we need for energy, so someone with type 1 diabetes is unable to get that sugar out of their blood. People with type 2, have a bit more difficulty doing so, because of a hormone called insulin. So type 1 needs to take insulin, because their body doesn’t make any. Whereas type 2 diabetes, they tend to have trouble using that insulin. So clinically, it’s a lifelong management of controlling medicine, physical activity, healthy eating and monitoring blood sugar, as well,” explains Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator Abbie Chesterson.

For more than 30 years, the team at the Sentara Diabetes Management Program has been helping patients understand and learn to live with their disease. “Our patients come to us through physician referrals. We are a group of nurses, dietitians and community health workers who follow a standard set of blood sugar targets for AmericanDiabetes Educators,” explains Team Coordinator Genevieve Thompson. (more…)


News
Spend the holidays in the City of Manassas

During the holidays, the Historic Downtown of the City of Manassas becomes an iconic winter wonderland full of charm and excitement. As visitors wander down Center Street, the buildings are outlined in twinkling lights, shop windows are filled with homemade Gingerbread houses and one can smell the season in the air.

This holiday season; spend some time in Downtown Manassas. December 1 at 5:15 p.m., Santa Lights Manassas. Santa will arrive by VRE train to light the City. There will be hayrides, ice-skating, holiday performances and fun for the whole family.

December 2 brings the 72 nd Annual Greater Manassas Christmas Parade. More than 100 floats, dancers, marching bands and assorted characters will travel along Center Street, heralding in the season.

Visitors are invited to take in the holiday charm with free horse-drawn carriage rides on Dec. 3, 10 and 17. Shopping and dining in the Historic Downtown is sure to bring on the holiday cheer, especially with the new Secret Santa registry available in downtown stores. And, if there’s someone on the list who is hard to buy for, why not get them a ManassasOpoly game.

For more information on these and other events in the City of Manassas, visit visitmanassas.org. Hope to see you around the City of Manassas.

 

News
Prince William County leaders proclaim birth of Baha’ullah, founder of Baha’i Faith

WOODBRIDGE — When it came time to approve the consent agenda at last night’s meeting, the Brentsville District Supervisor stopped the show.

“What is this?” asked Jeanine Lawson.

The elected leader questioned a proclamation to praise the founder of Baha’i Faith, Baha’ullah, 200 years ago.

“I had never heard of it,” said Lawson. “I’m not questioning its existence, but I’ve not seen something like this in the past three years during my time on the Board.”

Lawson said she was concerned that the county Board of Supervisors would proclaim one religion, opening up the floodgates for proclamations to other faiths.

“With all due respect Supervisor Lawson, just because we haven’t recognized the Bellu’i Faith since you’ve been on the Board doesn’t mean we shouldn’t start now,” said Woodbridge District Supervisor Frank Principi, who brought the proclamation to the Board.

Prince William County Attorney Michelle Robl was asked to weigh in. She said the proclamation was in line with what the Board had supported in the past.

“I don’t think this is putting the board behind a certain religion,” she said.

Lawson threatened to bring forward a resolution to requesting the Board of Supervisors honor Jesus Christ if this Board approved this particular resolution.

It did, with Lawson being the only leader to vote Nay.



‘At one point in the night, every patient got up, said their name, and shared how much they’ve lost. All told, 3971 collective pounds had been shed!’

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Men and women, of all ages, races, and sizes gathered together to remember what used to be.

It was all part of the bariatric team’s annual, “A Gala, Celebrating You.” For the sixth year in a row, people came together for a Weight Loss Surgery Patient Reunion at the Hylton Education Center at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center.

More than 40 former patients and their loved ones came out to remember their weight loss journey and celebrate how far they’ve come.

It was a reunion for many, with patients coming up to one another and asking tentatively, “Do you remember me?” Plenty of hugs, laughs, and smiles were exchanged.

At one point in the night, every patient got up, said their name, and shared how much they’ve lost. All told, 3971 collective pounds had been shed!

“It’s the best thing I’ve ever done- outside of marrying my husband!” chuckled Reva Gravelle.

Gravelle was just one member of a patient panel who spoke with the group and answered questions. She was 62 years old when she decided to move forward and get the surgery. Eight years later, she hasn’t looked back and says she feels healthier than ever! “Nothing tastes as good as thin feels,” she says smiling.

Just like Gravelle, everybody had their own story, but there was a common thread everyone could relate to. Patients shared varied firsts: having a lap for a grandchild to sit on, being able to get up by themselves when falling, flying without having to buy an extra seat or getting a seatbelt extender, different shopping options for clothing and being able to fit in a roller coaster seat.

Many patients credit their surgeon, Dr. Denis Halmi with helping them make the change, something he seemed little uncomfortable with, “I try to explain, it wasn’t me, because you are the one making the changes, because of what you are doing, it’s making the change. I’m here to help you, here to support you, but you’re the one who does it.”

While patients were in varied stages of their weight loss journey- some, having had their surgery years ago, while others had their surgery just months earlier, all know that this is a lifetime commitment. To that end, even the event’s food reflected their new lifestyle and featured healthy choices such as diced fruits and vegetables, shrimp, turkey meatballs and blended-to-order fruit smoothies.

This was also an uplifting event for those patients who may have gotten off track. Instead of beating up on themselves for diet missteps, patient speakers and health professional reminded everyone, while it’s nice to move numbers on the scale; this voyage is about more than that. It’s about getting healthy. Organizers reminded patients this event isn’t the only support available. The program hosts both weekly and monthly support groups for current and former patients. And, if those groups are too far for some to travel, the bariatric program has recently added a new virtual support group for the last Thursday of the month. It’s all in an effort to make sure people have the assistance they need to meet their health goals. To find a bariatric surgeon near you, call 1-800-SENTARA.

Photos: Dr. Halmi in the center, surrounded by patients who enjoyed a great time, and Dr. Halmi speaking to the group, sharing words of encouragement.


Fall into the New Classes here at MPCC

  • Manassas Park Community Center
  • Address: 99 Adams Street Manassas Park, Va.
  • Phone: 703-335-8872

The fall season conjures scenarios of bountiful baskets of freshly picked apples, pumpkins, and enchanting autumn foliage! It also brings a whole batch of new classes here at the Manassas Park Community Center, including the Road to Wellness, Focused Awareness Meditation, Bollywood and Classical Indian Dance, and Outdoor Yoga! Also, there are several music classes for the music lovers too!

These new classes focus on all types of music, dance, and whole-body wellness. One thing we all have in common as residents of Northern Virginia is that we are all under a lot of stress. Regardless of the reasons for that stress, we all need to find something to help us reduce it.

Several new classes here at the Community Center to help you better handle your stress include Focused Awareness Meditation and the Road to Wellness. Taught by Karen David of Live Life Well, LLC, and using her years of experience as a registered nurse, she uses her medical experience to help people change their lives! She says that when you believe in you, you will have the ability to not only believe in something but to reach optimal wellness through daily personal wellness habits.

“I base my classes on my own journey, and when I was spread super thin, my own health suffered,” Karen shared, “I defined my own values of relationships, defined my boundaries, and my values.” Those became the foundation for her Road to Wellness class.
“I ask my students and my clients to evaluate the boundaries they are forming. I help them to realize we have gone from looking and observing to just reacting, and I can help them to honestly answer questions about why they made their plan the way they did,” Karen added.

She further pointed out that it is great to take care of others, but not to forget to take care of yourself too. ‘Take care of others, but do not forget to ask what I have done for me,’ has become her mantra!

Appreciating music is another way to relieve stress. Called the “great soother,” music can help you process your emotions. Sometimes just turning up that radio, and screaming the words to your favorite song is just the thing to help you get past a bad day as you trudge home after a long day of work.

The new Music Appreciation, Music Theory, Jazz Appreciation, Music Ensemble classes here at the Community Center are all taught by a professional musician who uses his own experiences as the foundation to help others to love music the way he does.
Most music lovers have their own ideas and reasons for liking particular types of music, but his classes help students focus on the history of the particular genres of music while highlighting major composers of the day. Relax and enjoy the conversations, learn new techniques, and maybe even become more proficient on a musical instrument you have always wanted to learn to play!

Consider trying a new and different type of dance class also offered this fall at the Community Center this fall. Options include Bollywood and Classical Indian Dance, Hand Dancing, and Line Dancing with Scotty Inman. Come alone or with a partner to learn the basics of each dance: each with its own elegant style, charm, and fun dance styles.

As residents of Northern Virginia, we can all agree that the stress we encounter daily is something we cannot ignore. However, by trying one of the new fall classes offered at the Manassas Park Community Center, we could focus elsewhere, learn something new, and have lots of fun too!

The Manassas Park Community Center is located at 99 Adams Street in Manassas Park, VA. Managed by the City of Manassas Park Department of Parks and Recreation, the facility is home to basketball courts, a swimming pool, wellness areas, and 29 special events and programs. For more information visit us at ManassasParkCommunityCenter.com or call at 703-335-8872.

News
Quantico to graduate first female officer to complete Infantry Officer Course

From a press release: 

A female Marine officer made history today at Quantico, Va. by completing the Infantry Officer Course and earning the infantry officer military occupational specialty.

The lieutenant, who asked to keep her identity private, is the first female officer to successfully complete the course since the Marine Corps opened all military occupational specialties to women in April 2016.

“I am proud of this officer and those in her class? who have earned the infantry officer MOS,” said Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert Neller.

Infantry Officer Course is the MOS-producing school for Marine Corps infantry officers and the prerequisite course for ground intelligence officers. The grueling 13-week course trains and educates newly selected infantry and ground intelligence officers in leadership, infantry skills, and character required to serve as infantry platoon commanders in the operating forces.

One hundred and thirty-one Marines started the course in July, and 88 graduated today.

“Marines expect and rightfully deserve competent and capable leaders, and these IOC graduates met every training requirement as they prepare for the next challenge of leading infantry Marines; ultimately, in combat,” said Neller.

Her follow-on assignment is to 1st Marine Division, Camp Pendleton, Calif.

News
Modern Day Marine begins today at Quantico

QUANTICO — Today is the first day of the annual Modern Day Marine expo at Quantico.

The three-day event is expected to draw not only U.S. Marine Corps military and civilian personnel but also members of the other U.S. services, foreign military attaches, and corporate representatives from throughout the U.S. and several other nations.

This is the 37th year for the show, and the 25th consecutive year it has been held at Quantico. 

The show features exhibitors on Lejeune Field, and panels to discuss the future of the warfighting and its impact on the Marine Corps. Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert B. Neller will be on hand at 10 a.m. Wednesday to introduce the new Navy and Marine Corps operating concept: “Littoral Operations in a Contested Environment (LOCE).

The event will culminate on Thursday with a banquet dinner at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Crystal City.

News
Quantico drinking water is discolored, but base officials say its safe to drink

Residents who live aboard Quantico Marine Corps Base are reporting a funky discoloration to their water.

For the past three days, Quantico officials say they’ve received multiple phone calls from concerned residents who say the water color is off. That has led to the additional testing of the water on base, and officials tell us they’re looking for the cause of the problem.

Recent tests, however, show the water is safe to drink, they say. The discoloration may become from a higher than normal concentration of manganese in the water, added base officials.

There’s also the fact that, in the past three months, the base switched it source of drinking water — and then switched back again.

From a press release issued today by Quantico officials:

Over the last three months, PWB switched to water from our primary source, Breckenridge Reservoir, to our secondary source at Grey Reservoir, while work was being done on the dam a Breckenridge Reservoir.

This past week construction reached a point where water could be switched back to Breckenridge. However, upon doing so water plant operators noticed high organic material in the water and switched back to Grey until the cause could be determined.

Organic material comes from decayed leaves, tree debris and vegetation. Manganese is a natural mineral commonly found in rocks and soil and thus also found in waterways. The increased levels of manganese in the treated water are believed to be causing the discoloration.

During the treatment process, the MCBQ Water Treatment Plant uses chlorine to disinfect the water and control manganese levels to make the water clear and safe for drinking. These levels are being adjusted to account for the higher concentrations of manganese.

Manganese is not a health hazard and is not regulated by the EPA as a drinking water contaminant. EPA considers manganese a secondary contaminant for aesthetic reasons only. The EPA level for manganese, for aesthetic purposes, is 0.05 mg/l. Current manganese levels tested in housing this morning are around 0.002 mg/l to 0.05 mg/l for Thomason Park and Lyman Park West. Lyman Park East tested at 0.08 mg/l. The higher concentrations in Lyman Park East are above EPA’s aesthetic level, but there is still no health concern. Although the other two housing areas are below EPA’s aesthetic level, these concentrations can still cause discoloration.

The safety of MCBQ’s water supply is our top priority. As part of its regulatory oversight, the Virginia Department of Health-Office of Drinking Water works closely with MCBQ PWB and the Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs (NREA) Branch to monitor water production at our water treatment plant. The department’s most recent review of drinking water sampling data shows that the utility is meeting all Safe Drinking Water Act standards. We apologize for the inconvenience this has caused and ask for your continued patience as our crews work to resolve the discoloration issue.

For further information or to report water discoloration in base housing areas, call Lincoln Military Housing Maintenance at 1-888-578-4141.

Traffic
20 years in the making, Arkendale project on track to speed up train service

QUANTICO — Nine miles of new track and improvements to Quantico’s rail station is underway and are hoped to help alleviate some of the congestion on the busy Interstate 95 corridor between Stafford and Washington, D.C.

The Arkendale to Powell’s Creek ‘third track project’ on the Potomac River is a $115 million-dollar investment of federal and state funds to benefit intercity passenger rail service in the I-95 Corridor.

Part of a larger initiative, The Atlantic Gateway, the Arkendale project includes construction of a third track between Richmond and Washington. The third track segment will be used to enhance the performance schedule for intercity passenger service, high-speed passenger rail service, and Virginia Railway Express (VRE) commuter service while preserving freight operations by allowing trains to meet, pass or overtake other trains.

Project improvements also include structures such as under-grade and overhead railroad bridges, railroad crossings and signal systems.

Improvements to Quantico Station include conversion of a side platform to an island platform with a pedestrian bridge over the railroad tracks, enabling all three tracks to serve the passenger station. (more…)

News
Little League Championship kicks off at Marine Corps museum

Parents and children gathered on Thursday night for a dinner at the National Museum of the Marine Corps to mark the opening of the Virginia Little League Championship. 

The dinner was a ticketed-only event and attracted players and their families from all over the Commonwealth — some as far as eight hours away. 

The tournament will be held this week near the museum at Fuller Heights Park. 

These photos are by Catherine Hanafin: 

 

News
Stafford Armed Services Memorial opens

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STAFFORD — Lloyd Willis and his wife searched for their brick.

The couple from Colonial Beach purchased the memorial stone to support the new Stafford County Armed Services Memorial. Willis, 92, served in the Army in World War II and Korea.

“It’s important that we do this to set the example for the future of our country,” said Willis. When he enlisted at age 18, Willis said it was his brother who set the example for him — one of service to the nation when Germany and Japan threatened the U.S. and the world.

He was one of the thousands who came to the dedication of the new memorial at 10 a.m. Saturday, July 15 at the Stafford County Government Center. Hundreds sat underneath large tents, while others took shelter under shade trees to avoid the hot summer sun.

Veterans from Korea and Vietnam wore hats, and some leather vests and jackets. Active service members wore their uniforms, and all listed to music played by Quantico Marine Corps Band. (more…)

News
Virginia Little League Tournament a win for sports tourism

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TRIANGLE — More than 1,000 people are expected to descend on Triangle next weekend for the Virginia Little League Championship.

Teams from across the state will travel to Prince William County, from as far as eight hours away, to play for the chance to win and move on to the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa.

A total of 35 games will be played over the tournament’s five days, July 20 to 25. On the field, more than 500 children and teens will take the field and play baseball. Parents, friends, family members, and baseball players are expected to stay in area hotels, eat at restaurants, and shop at area stores.

Landing the tournament is a win for Discover Prince William, the county’s convention, and visitors bureau, which started a sports tourism program three years ago designed to attract such events to the county. The teams will play at the three-year-old Fuller Heights Park at 18511 Fuller Heights Road, just outside the main entrance to Quantico Marine Corps Base.

“It has lots of parking, and restrooms, so it’s a great place to hold the tournament,” said one event organizer Brendon Hannifin. (more…)



Ornery Brewery set the tone for brew pubs in Prince William

Prince William Beer Trail

Editors note: This is the third in a series of posts showcasing breweries in Prince William County, Virginia.

Prince William County’s first brewpub just did something every brewery wants to do: Distribute its beer on the wholesale market to local restaurants.

Now diners in Northern Virginia and Washington, D.C. can enjoy a cold glass of beer from Ornery Beer Company in Woodbridge. The brewpub — a combination brewery and restaurant with a chef-driven menu — opened near Potomac Mills in 2015.

“When we starting thinking about this business, this county didn’t have a brewpub. It had a brewery or two but not a brewpub that served delicious beer and food,” said Ornery Brewery owner Randy Barnette, of Gainesville.

Barnette was an investor in a brewpub in Falls Church and thought he could bring the same quality product to Prince William County. Before Ornery, Barnette operated the Hard Times Cafe in Woodbridge for 15 years. That restaurant had run its course, he said, and Barnette gave the space an complete overhaul before opening Ornery Brewery.

Barnette knew how to run a restaurant, so he hired master brewer Chris Jacques to create Ornery’s 15 signature beer flavors. The brewpub serves everything from dark and beers to IPAs — just about anything a craft beer enthusiast would expect to find at a small brewery.

Last October, he promoted Ferdinand McAdoo to the position of head brewer, who has been Ornery since its opening.

A favorite of restaurant goers is Ornery’s Blonde Ale, a light beer that pairs well with just about anything.

“Prince William County has a very, very diverse demographic and our beers have to be very, very diverse,” explained Barnette. “We’re not as defined in our types of beer as you might see in some other places.”



Explore summer reading at your Prince William Public Library: Young Adults

 

Free food, prizes, and events all summer long!

How it Works:

Explore Summer Reading is happening now until August 19. A couple of weeks ago we talked about summer reading for kids, infants through students entering 5th grade.

Today it’s all about the teens! Young adults (entering grades 6 – 12), come to any library branch to register and pick up a Punch Card, and we’ll give you your first punch. Then each time you visit the library, tell us what you’re reading and we’ll punch your card. At your second visit, we’ll give you a free food coupon. And at your sixth visit, more free food!

Grand Prizes

But wait, there’s more! We’re giving away a $100 prize at each of our 11 branches, plus one grand prize, a Beats™ Pill+. Each visit counts as an entry into the drawings, and you can earn punches for up to nine visits. Plus, write a book review and enter it on our Explore Summer Reading website, www.pwcgov.org/summerreading, and earn extra entries! You might also find your book review published to our Goodreads page, www.pwcgov.org/goodreads.

Weekly Challenges and Events

Come in each week of summer reading and complete the weekly challenge for the chance to win additional prizes. Then put your smartphone down and come to a free event, such as a cartooning workshop, art class, cooking demo, magic workshop, reptile show, laser tag party, and much more. For the full lineup, pick up a copy of Explore magazine at any library or visit our events page at www.pwcgov.org/library/events.

Then pick your smartphone back up and tag us #PWPLSsummer on social media. Find us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Tag us and we might repost! (more…)



PotomacLocal.com is the newest tenant at CENTERFUSE

PotomacLocal.com is the newest tenant at CENTERFUSE, the budding co-workspace in Downtown Manassas.

The seven-year-old digital media company with a focus on local news, politics, and transportation issues in the Prince William County region will not only produce news coverage and content at the Manassas co-working center but will engage with readers and local business owners there, too.

“My job as an entrepreneurial journalist on any given day requires me to be in multiple places in Prince William County, Manassas, and Manassas Park. While a traditional office has never been in our plans, the flexibility, open work environment, and business support from the staff at CENTERFUSE are just what our company needs to grow,” said Potomac Local Media Founder and Publisher Uriah Kiser.

With Potomac Local’s acquisition of a dedicated workspace at CENTERFUSE, the company will launch a new podcast to discuss issues facing area residents. Additionally, Potomac Local will hold community events at CENTERFUSE to engage readers and residents, as well as hold scheduled publisher’s “office hours” where readers may visit with Potomac Local writers to share story ideas, as well as voice
neighborhood concerns in a one-on-one setting.

“We’re very pleased to welcome Potomac Local as our newest member of CenterFuse.  Our facility, located in Downtown Manassas lends a perfect opportunity for Uriah to connect with areas of Prince William County while working in a pristine location in the City of Manassas,” said Historic Manassas Inc. Director Debbie Haight. 

CENTERFUSE opened in early May and caters to entrepreneurs in need of shared workspace. Historic Manassas Inc. is contracted to provide small business support services to CENTERFUSE members.  

News
South Korean President Moon Jae-in visits Quantico, grateful to the Marine Corps for helping family

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Photos: Mary Davidson

South Korean President Moon Jae-in laid a wreath at Quantico Marine Corps Base on this first official visit to the U.S.

From a National Museum of the Marine Corps:  press release sent before the event: 

South Korean President Moon Jae-in will visit the National Museum of the Marine Corps on Wednesday to pay his respects to the Marine Corps for helping to evacuate his parents from North Korea in 1950.

During his first official visit to the United States President Moon will lay a wreath, dedicate a tree and deliver remarks at the Chosin Reservoir Monument in the Museum’s Semper Fidelis Memorial Park.

The president’s parents were evacuated from North Korea by the 1st Marine Division following the culmination of the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir. He continues to be very grateful to the Marine Corps for its assistance to his family and he credits those actions as contributing to his success.

Also delivering remarks will be Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert B. Neller. Korean War veterans will attend the ceremony at the invitation of President Moon.

The Museum’s Korean War Gallery offers an opportunity to better understand the war. The Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

At Wednesday’s ceremony, Jae-in called the rescue of his parents one of the greatest humanitarian aides of all time.

Potomac Local Photographer Mary Davidson captured the images in this post. 

Jae-in is in the U.S. to visit with President Donald Trump for the first time since taking office last month.

 

News
Down but not out: Stewart returns to Prince William with 2 more years as county’s top elected leader

Corey Stewart regularly makes a good political showing in Prince William County.

When he won a 2015 bid to keep his seat as County Board Chairman, At-large, the Republican beat his Democratic opponent winning 57% of the vote. He not only did well in the county’s more conservative western precincts, but he also did well in mid-county precincts like Coles, Penn, Marshall, Hylton, and Spriggs.

On the county’s heavily Democratic-leaning eastern side, the voters in the Occoquan District who originally voted him as their district supervisor in 2006 overwhelmingly voted for him again in 2015, as the Republican won every precinct in the Occoquan District except York.

Current Occoquan District Supervisor Ruth Anderson, a Republican, also won her campaign that year running against former Occoquan Mayor Earnie Porta, a Democrat, who carried name recognition not only from his time in office but his involvement in non-profit groups and the chamber of commerce. At the time, local political pundits said Anderson, a political newcomer, was able to ride Stewart’s coattails in the Occoquan District as voters cast ballots down party lines.

Stewart on Tuesday night lost his Primary Election bid to be Virginia’s next Republican gubernatorial candidate to Ed Gillespie by just over one percent. It was the second time Stewart sought higher state office following a losing 2013 bid to be Virginia Lt. Governor. (more…)

News
Torch Run for Special Olympic Games set for June 8

From Prince William County Police:

The Torch that symbolizes the beginning of the Special Olympics Games in Richmond, Va., will be lit in Arlington and carried by police officers and Special Olympians down U.S. Route 1 to Richmond on Thursday, June 8, 2017.

In Prince William County, the torch will start at the Prince William-Fairfax line at U.S. Route 1 and end at the entrance to the U.S. Marine Corps Base at U.S. Route 1 and Fuller Road. Police Recruits in the current Criminal Justice Academy class will be participating in the Torch Run, and members of the Department’s Motorcycle Unit will escort the runners through the county. (more…)

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