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How Home Instead Senior Care of Manassas matches the right CAREGiver to your loved one

Editors note: This paid promotional post was written by Potomac Local in collaboration with Home Instead Senior Care of Manassas, serving Prince William and Fauquier counites.

Matching the right CAREGiver to the right client is a very serious and rewarding job.

Gail Earhart is the Relationships Manager for Home Instead Senior Care located in Manassas, which provides local CAREgivers to seniors in Prince William, Fairfax, and Fauquier counties.

“On a daily basis a lot of what I do is in the staffing department because we have clients on any given day…or up to any given week we could have up to 60 to 70 shifts to fill,” said Earhart.

However, filling the slots with CAREGivers isn’t the easiest task to complete. One of the biggest challenges Earhart and the staffing team faces when filling shifts is that each client has different needs, and each CAREGiver has a different preference.

“So you might have a client who has a dog or a cat and then you have a CAREGiver, who won’t go to somebody who has a dog or a cat,” said Earhart. “Or you have a client who has Alzheimer’s so we have to ensure that we have a CAREGiver, who’s seasoned working with somebody who has Alzheimer’s.”

 

Consultation 

Finding out the preferences and needs for both client and CAREGiver are important steps in delivering quality care. It starts at the beginning by consulting with new clients by Client Care Coordinators.

“Our Client Care Coordinators go out, and when they’re doing a consultation they find all this information out,” said Earhart. The Client Care Coordinators then return and tell staffing what exactly their client needs and the appropriate type of CAREgiver for their client.

Home Instead has 200 CAREGivers, which seems like a daunting task when matching the right CAREGiver to the right client. However, members of staffing know the CAREGivers so well they make it their job to know who is the right fit for their client.

Recently, Earhart completed a consultation of a client who was described by his daughter as “narrow minded” and “stubborn.”

In this case, the family requested a CAREGiver who was assertive and not someone young who the client can potentially take advantage of. So Home Instead matched the correct CAREGiver to the client who would make sure the client did what might seem the most basic of things, eat regular meals and shower on a regular basis.

 

Filling specific needs 

Sometimes, clients can be very particular about finding the right CAREGiver. And that’s OK. Many times families prefer non-smokers in the home or simply a companion for their loved one.

“Sometimes they say ‘I want a really talkative CAREGiver. Somebody’s who’s going to sit with my mom for three hours and just talk about life’ and we have that and that’s part of our service,” said Earhart.

Much of a CAREGiver’s role is “filling that gap” when a family member needs to go out when they can’t be with their loved one. Which is why it’s so important for a perfect match to exist between client and CAREGiver.

“The last thing I want to do is send somebody in there who’s a very quiet CAREGiver. We have those too so we want to make that perfect match,” said Earhart,” …but we tell every client if we don’t send the correct CAREGiver, if there isn’t a match, it doesn’t feel like a good fit, call us because we can send you somebody else.”

Successfully matching clients and CAREGivers can sometimes be an “ongoing process,” but when that perfect match happens and the client or client’s family sends positive feedback there’s no better feeling.

A care consultation can take up to an hour and a half .

“The first probably 45 minutes is just talking to the family, getting to know the family, finding out what their needs are. We have a complete form [and] we’re taking notes the entire time,” said Earhart.

It’s within these first 45 minutes do Client Care Coordinators know whether or not the client will be signed up. The last 30 minutes is dedicated to paperwork but discussion still happens between the family and client and Client Care Coordinator.

 

The best and most common questions families ask Client Care Coordinators include:

 

What type of CAREGiver will be sent to me?
Are they certified, bonded, or insured?
Do CAREGivers do drug testing?
Will the CAREGiver be permanent or temporary?

 

“Obviously our goal is to have permanency so if somebody is scheduled Monday, Wednesday, Friday they want the same person,” said Earhart.

However, it’s not a guarantee that clients will always have the same CAREGiver. It may take between two to three weeks to find the best two CAREGivers for clients in case one CAREGiver needs to call out in the future.

Some clients need around the clock care and see up to three CAREGivers each day.

“When we have a 24/7 client, we work on having 24/7 teams. We’ve had a client now for almost two years that has the same eight CAREGivers on that team” said Earhart. “They just rotate through the week and then the weekend.”

 

If its not working

It can be hard for families to initiate the conversation that a CAREGiver isn’t working out.

“We do get those phone calls and it might be ‘my dad’s just not hitting it off with this CAREGiver’,” said Earhart, “or maybe it’s something that the client unfortunately just doesn’t like about the CAREGiver and that’s okay too because not everybody makes a connection, not everybody makes a hit.”

To find out why a match isn’t successful, Earhart normally gets to the center of the problem. For example, if a family complains that the CAREGiver is on the phone too much steps will be taken to correct that and no further action needs to be taken. Or the family loves the CAREGiver but the CAREGiver can’t cook or complete a certain skill that properly fulfills the client’s needs.

“Jeannie Carroll is our CAREGiver Retention Coordinator and she has the best job here I think at Home Instead because she works directly with the CAREGivers,” said Earhart.

Jeannie spends 30 days with the CAREGivers, accompanies them on their first shift, and supervises them for 30 days to monitor their progress.

 

Making it a success 

What helps to make success more likely for both client and CAREGiver is that initial intake and assessment that has all of the client’s needs and preferences. When a CAREGiver is first assigned to a client, they must read everything about that client and if a CAREGiver’s preferences don’t match with the client’s, another CAREGiver can be assigned before one is sent to the client.

Journals are provided to the family and client to take note of the daily care received and if something raises questions, Home Instead can be contacted. Phone numbers are not exchanged between client or the client’s family and CAREGiver so that everything goes through Home Instead’s office.

“No client is ever left without somebody, so whatever it takes we’re going to be there,” said Earhart. 

Traffic
Quantico street paving job 30 years in the making

Quantico streets are getting resurfaced for the first time in 30 years.

The Virginia Department of Transportation hired Julis Branscome Inc. to repave about 3 miles of streets in the small town. C Street, Broadway Street, Potomac Avenue, 2nd, 3rd, and 5th streets are all being repaved at a cost of $282,000.

Milling work began on Monday, October. 12, while patching work began October 16. Paving should begin Monday and be completed by midweek, stated VDOT spokeswoman Jennifer McCord in an email.

River Road serves traffic to and from Hospital Point on Quantico Marine Corps Base. The road is not part of the project because it is maintained by the base, said Quantico Town Clerk Rita Frazier.

The last time the town’s streets were paved at this scale was in 1985, added Frazier.

These upcoming events help you celebrate ‘Spooktacular Manassas’

Now that the leaves are starting to take on red and auburn hues and the morning air feels crisp – it means it is time to celebrate fall in Manassas! From the annual Fall Jubilee to creepy cemetery tours, there is something going on every weekend in the City. There is no better place to celebrate autumn and Halloween!

The 2015-16 season of the Manassas Ballet Theater starts on Oct. 23 with the show “Jazz in Motion,” which combines ballet with contemporary and classic jazz standards. Show your tickets to several downtown restaurants and receive a dinner & a show discount! See the complete list online. Hylton Performing Arts Center. Tickets start at $15.

Take a guided tour of the Spirits of Manassas on Oct. 24 and trace the stories of the weird and sublime. Hear about historical figures who once passed through town, including authors Charles Dickens and Edgar Allen Poe, The Gray Ghost (John S. Mosby) who spent time at the old Opera House, and learn about strange incidents along the railroad tracks – including a ghost cow! Tours start at the Manassas Museum on the half hour from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Buy tickets at the Museum, online, or call 703-368-1873 – $15/adults; $7.50/kids 12 and under.

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Join the last bicycle tour of the season on Oct. 24 from 9 to 11 a.m. Explore historic areas around Manassas with fellow cyclists. See historic homes, the only remaining earthwork constructed in 1861 by Confederate soldiers, and more. Buy tickets at the Museum, online, or call 703-368-1873 – $5.

Swing by Haunted Happenings on Oct. 24 from 10 a.m. to noon for family fun. Activities will be held in the Center for the Arts parking lot. Kids can decorate their own pumpkin and participate in a costume contest before heading into downtown businesses for trick-or-treating. 9431 West Street. Downtown Manassas. Free.

Hurricane Joaquin threatened to rain out the Annual Fall Jubilee, so it was rescheduled for Oct. 24 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Browse cool crafts, play games, pick out a pumpkin, and enjoy live music and dance performances. Enter pumpkin pie baking and eating contests or the cornhole tournament. Manassas. Free.

Follow the Headless Horseman to the Pied Piper Theatre company’s production of Sleepy Hollow on Oct. 24 at 2 and 7 p.m. and  at 3 p.m. Metz Middle School. 9950 Wellington Rd. Tickets start at $11.

Don’t miss taking a tour of the Manassas City Cemetery, which dates back to the 1860s, on Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. Manassas is not a quiet little town where nothing ever happens! Listen to tales about the City’s most notorious figures, gory murders, criminals behaving badly, and crossed debutantes. Manassas City Cemetery at 9317 Center Street. Buy tickets at the Manassas Museum, online, or by calling 703-368-1873 – $5. (These stories are not meant for children’s ears!)

Follow the trail of balloons downtown to businesses displaying artwork by local featured artists during the Fall Gallery Walk on Friday, Nov. 6 from 6 to 9 p.m. Downtown Manassas. Free.

Get a jump start on your holiday shopping and support patient care at the Holiday Bazaar at the Novant Health Prince William Medical Center on Nov. 6 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Nov. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Browse handmade and one-of-a-kind items – see the website for a list of vendors. Medical Office Building, 8700 Sudley Rd., 14th floor. Free.

Join your fellow community members at the Greater Manassas Veterans Day Parade on Nov. 7 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Stop by a downtown coffee shop and settle in along the parade route along Center Street to celebrate area Veterans. Downtown Manassas. Free.

Don’t forget the farmer’s market continues to be open on Thursdays in the Harris Pavilion and Saturdays in Parking Lot B from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Pick up your favorite fall staples before grabbing lunch nearby.

Spine-chilling tales will be told at historic Brentsville Courthouse, Rippon Lodge

With nearly 300 years of settled history, Prince William County has generated more than its fair share of paranormal activity. For those who would like to know more about our local ghost stories, special programs at two historic sites will explore some of the more famous stories and even possibly scare you.

Brentsville Courthouse 

It is said that Brentsville Courthouse Historic Center is haunted by the men and women who passed away in this area. On October 23 and 24, Brentsville Courthouse Historic Centre in Bristow, Virginia will host special candlelight tours of the site. Each tour will explore some of the haunted history of the site, such as the murder of James Clark inside the renovated jail, or a 19th century County Sherriff, and much more!

Tours will begin at 7 p.m., with the last tour leaving at 9 p.m., though tours are not recommended for children under 12. Reservations strongly recommended.

For more information please call 703-365-7895.

Rippon Lodge

Rippon Lodge

Rippon Lodge 

It was once said that Rippon Lodge is said to be haunted in such a ghostly and sinister fashion that no one will occupy it.” On October 30, Rippon Lodge Historic Site in Woodbridge, Virginia will present a special evening program about famous ghost stories from Colonial Virginia. Our amphitheater will come to life for a delightfully spine chilling evening! Story times will be at 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.. The cost is $5 per person, and reservations are strongly recommended.

For more information please call 703-499-9812.

Are you feeling creative? The call for the 2nd banner art contest for 2016 is open

A creative spirit and an artistic flare contribute to the City of Manassas’ “modern beat.” Once the historic downtown was designated an Arts and Tourism district, it became PL 2a growing destination for public art, galleries, and events. From works of art by local artists on display in restaurants and in City Hall to the curated shows and performances at the Center for Arts, the community embraces and celebrates creativity. This month, however, the City of Manassas’ art scene is interactive. Artists and art lovers have three opportunities to contribute to the community’s creative vibe.

First, it’s time to vote for your favorite banner on the lampposts in downtown. Historic Manassas Inc. sponsored a contest calling for banner designs and received more than 130 works of art from area artists. Faced with a tough decision, a Selection Committee chose 60 pieces of art to decorate the downtown and named the contest’s winner – “Train Station” by Kelly Willis, which featured the City’s historic depot.

But there is a second prize still up for grabs – the $500 People’s Choice Award. After months of admiring the works of art blowing in the breeze, you can now vote for your favorite. You have many choices ranging from fiery sunsets to cherry blossoms to teetering tea cups. Pick up a walking tour guide at the Manassas Visitor’s Center in the train depot and stroll downtown to view each banner one more time. Enjoy a day downtown, pick up a cup of coffee, do a little shopping, and deliberate over lunch before dropping off a ballot at the Manassas Visitor’s Center by Oct. 30.

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Are you feeling creative? The call for the second banner art contest for 2016 is now open. Artists over 16 may submit their designs and vie for a chance to be a part of Manassas’ art scene. The application and guidelines are available on Historic Manassas’ Inc.’s website. The deadline for submissions is Jan. 15, 2016. Don’t wait for the last minute. In addition to having your work on display in the community, there is a $1,000 grand prize.

Lastly, since it is never too early to get into the holiday spirit, the City has issued a call for ornaments for the holiday tree at Virginia’s Executive Mansion. All submitted ornaments will be on display at City Hall, but one lucky ornament will be sent to Richmond. The Governor is seeking one-of-a-kind, handmade ornaments that fit in with the theme, “Celebrating Virginia’s Localities.” If you have an idea for a unique way to represent the City of Manassas, drop your 6-inch ornament off at City Hall by Oct. 20. Learn more online.

Manassas set the bar with high-quality, truly local craft spirits and beer

The craft beer, wine, and spirits industry has been growing in leaps and bounds.

In the last few years, two breweries and a distillery have opened in the City of Manassas. While each place offers their own unique vibe and products, two characteristics unite and set them apart from the competition – a commitment to quality and local ingredients.

“Similar to the farm-to-table movement, people are excited by the grain-to-glass concept and high-quality products made from local grains,” says Bill Karlson, the co-founder and CEO of KO Distilling. “We make a point of telling people during tours that our wheat comes from Renwood Farms in Charles City and our rye came from Bay’s Best Feed Farm in Virginia’s Northern Neck.”

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KO Distilling opened in September and welcomed 450 people to its grand opening. During its first week, more than 100 people stopped by to sample its whiskey and gins. The distillery is a true agribusiness – the spirits are not just made in Virginia, but the majority of the grains used are sourced from local farms.

A Nielsen study found that “local, authentic” are qualities desired of beer and spirits growing in importance among consumers, most largely among the 21-34 demographic.  Perhaps that is because today about 75% of adults over the age of 21 live within 10 miles of a brewery. The Atlantic reported that there were 70 small distilleries in the U.S. in 2003. Karlson says that KO is the 19th craft distiller in an industry of about 1000 microdistillers.

Customers seek quality and want to know how ingredients are sourced, says Sarah Meyers, co-founder of Manassas’ first craft brewery BadWolf Brewing Company.

“We try to source local whenever possible and at Little BadWolf they get to see beer being made right in front of them. Given how many craft breweries are popping up, we might hit a saturation point, so you need to make sure your quality is way up there and that is our biggest focus.”

The beer made at Heritage Brewing has a 100-percent organic base and 92 percent of all ingredients are either organic or locally sourced.  Sean Arroyo, CEO of Heritage Brewing, explains, “Our approach is committing ourselves to the consistency and quality of our product and bringing the best ingredients that we can through organics and local aspects.”

This fall, Heritage is collaborating with The Bone, a barbecue spot in historic Manassas, on a bacon stout. And BadWolf is working with downtown Manassas restaurateurs on an “Old Town” Beer that will only be available in downtown establishments.

Experimenting with new creations keeps the excitement alive. Heritage, which is a 20-barrel brew house, also operates a small pilot system for making small batches of creative releases for the taproom. “It gives us a way to interact with our consumers and let them decide what our next big beers will be,” says Arroyo.

After BadWolf’s successful first year, Meyers and her business partner and husband Jeremy opened a 6,000-square foot production facility. Little BadWolf Brewing Company, the smaller, original location, is where people can try out the experimental batches and even suggest recipes, while the new Big BadWolf has space for special events and growler and kegs of their flagship brews.

“We are using our space for more than beer,” says Meyers. “We focus on giving back to charities and bringing people together for social events.” One look at BadWolf’s event calendar shows there is always something going on, including yoga, painting, and Craft Beer Bingo – all accompanied with a pint. Similarly, Heritage hosts trivia and live music nights in addition to special events like a new beer dinner series.

While all three businesses are committed to building a sense of community, they also take being a regional destination seriously. As Meyers says, “people won’t go to just a bar, but places like a brewery are something special they will seek out.”

Karlson says that he and his business partner, John O’Mara, always envisioned KO Distilling being a tourism destination by matching a great product with a great experience. “The minute visitors walk through our doors,” he says, “they know they aren’t in a warehouse anymore.”

KO Distilling’s tasting room has leather couches, a fireplace, and copper and oak design elements that mimic the copper pot still they use for distilling and barrels they use for aging. The atmosphere rewards locals as well as travelers for making the drive. Karlson, Meyers, and Arroyo all agree that Manassas, with its close proximity to I-95 and 66 and its abundance of historical sites and attractions, is an ideal location for attracting tourists from the metro area and beyond.

“What we want to do is bring in the community, produce a quality product, and have a great time doing it,” says Meyers.

News
Stewart, Smith faceoff Thursday at NOVA Manassas

Stewart

Stewart

The candidates for Chairman of the Prince William County Board of Supervisors will face each other in a debate Thursday night.

Republican incumbent Corey Stewart and Democrat challenger Rick Smith are scheduled to meet at 7 p.m. at the Manassas Campus of Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA). This is the first one-on-one meeting of the two candidates since the

rick smith

Smith

two debated at an NAACP forum held at Gar-Field Senior High School earlier this month.

The debate is sponsored by the Prince William Chamber of Commerce and the Manassas Campus of NOVA.

Prince William Chamber Director of Government Relations Brendon Shaw outlined the debate topics in an email to Potomac Local:

We plan to cover:

Economic Development

–Expanding the commercial tax base
–Transportation
–Balancing the needs of the business community and residents
–Land use
–Education

[NOVA] will have two students participate to ask questions. Keith Scarborough from the [Prince William County] Electoral Board will discuss changes to the county’s voting system following the debate.

The debate will begin at 7 p.m. in Howsman Hall and is open to the public.

A third a final debate between the two candidates will take place at 7 p.m. on October 7 10 at Congregation Ner Shalom across from C.D. Hylton High School.

False: Most high-quality olive oil comes from Italy

Olive oil. We all have a bottle in our pantry. But can you cook with it?

Is first cold press the best olive oil you can get?

I’m Cameron, co-owner of Manassas Olive Oil Company, and I’m going to breakdown some common myths about this kitchen staple.

Myth 1: You can’t cook with olive oil

Status: False

This misconception stems from olive oil smoking or breaking down at low temperatures.
Olive oil only has a low smoke point if it has a high quantity of free fatty acids (FFAs). High levels of FFAs – which have been linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes – indicate poor quality or old olive oil.

All the olive oil we carry at Manassas Olive Oil Company has less than 0.2% free fatty acid content – meaning it won’t smoke until at least 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

As far as withstanding heat – all types of oil break down when heat is applied.

Inexpensive oils – such as canola oil – form toxic byproducts like aldehydes when heated. But when olive oil is heated, it’s some of the antioxidants will break down instead, ‘sacrificing’ themselves and prevent toxic chemicals from being produced by the oil. Look for a high polyphenol (antioxidant) content when purchasing olive oil for high temperature cooking.

Myth 2: First cold press is the best olive oil

Status: Partially True

First, cold pressing is a requirement to produce extra virgin olive oil, but it is somewhat of a misnomer. Cold pressing refers to any olive oil pressed below 80 degrees Fahrenheit and without the addition of chemicals.

As for second press – that has become a thing of the past. Historically, olives were quite literally pressed with huge stones, with the first press extracting the best oil, and subsequent presses extracting lower quality oil.

The olive press has been replaced by a malaxer (horizontal mixer) and centrifuge which pulverize olives, and extract almost all of the oil from them. This method is so efficient, only 5% of oil gets left behind on this ‘first press.”
This leftover oil is must be chemically extracted, and is referred to as “pomace oil.” Pomace oil cannot be sold or labeled as “olive oil’ – nor is it good to consume.

Generally speaking, all commercial olive oil will come from the first press. But be advised – even poor quality olive oil can come from the first cold press.

Myth 3: Most high-quality olive oil comes from Italy

Status: Mostly False

According to a study done by the International Olive Council, Spain produces 40% of the world’s olive oil – or about the same amount as Italy and Greece combined.

So where does the best oil come from? That’s a complicated equation.

Great olive oil is a lot like wine – it depends on the cultivar of olive you’re getting, what kind of conditions it grew in, and how the pressing was handled. Even oils from the same grove will vary year to year.

You should try different varieties of oil. Much like different wine grapes produce different wines, different types of olives will also produce different flavor profiles of oil.

Currently, six different types of extra virgin olive oil are available to taste at Manassas Olive Oil Company.

Have more questions about olive oil, or are interested in learning more? Visit our shop located in downtown Manassas, at 9406 Grant Avenue. We are more than happy to share our knowledge.

Delicious Downtown: Manassas Restaurant Week returns

raw bar, Manassas, virginia

Foodies have a great reason to get excited about fall!

September marks the return of Historic Manassas Restaurant Week. Restaurant Week is a tourism and marketing promotion celebrated throughout the U.S. to help bring in new customers and grow local businesses. Local restaurants feature their cuisine and offer a multi-course tasting experience for a special price.

Historic Manassas Inc. produces this event to showcase the City’s exciting culinary scene and encourage people to visit downtown businesses. Diners can try out places where they haven’t yet dined and regulars can score a great deal at their local favorites. Most Restaurant Week promotions are two courses for $25 or three courses for $35 and the specials run September 20 – 26.

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Insider’s Scoop on Restaurant Week Specials

Carmello’s (9108 Center Street) brings seasonal fine dining and an award-winning wine list to Historic Manassas. Their Restaurant Week dinner for $35 will offer a choice of a chopped house or caesar salad to start; a choice of gnocchi con carne, veal Napolitano, or marinated pork chops for an entrée; and either crème brule or chocolate hazelnut cake for dessert.

C.J. Finz Raw Bar & Grille (9413 West Street) is the City’s surf and turf destination. They have a fantastic deal that starts with your choice of a pint of beer or wine and is followed by a half-dozen shucked oysters or a half-pound of spiced shrimp. Your meal continues with your choice of several sandwiches, including a lobster roll, fried oyster po’boy, tuna tacos, salmon BLT, as well as non-fishy options like rib-eye steak, grilled chicken, or a burger on pretzel roll.

City Square Café (9428 Battle Street), where many enjoy artisan charcuterie and cheese boards, will entice diners with a choice of appetizer, entrée, and dessert for $35 during dinner. For $48, you can indulge on a wine pairing with your meal.

El Cactus (9406 Battle Street) offers fresh Tex-Mex favorites. During Restaurant Week, two can dine for $36. Pick one of five different appetizers to share, including the Manassas Soup Bowl-winning chicken tortilla soup. Entrees on special include carne asada, smoking fajitas, mole salmon, shrimp-topped tilapia, honey roasted cilantro chicken, and sweet honey salmon salad. Dessert features churros or the Taste of Manassas-winning tres leches.  

Mackey’s (9412 Main Street), an American pub, is home to bourbon-glazed, “drunken” meats from the grill as well as plenty of “pub grub” favorites. They are offering an appetizer and entrée combo for $25.

Monza (9405 Battle Street) is where you can enjoy live music on the weekends and your favorite team on the big screens. They will be offering a choice of bruschetta, mozzarella sticks, arancini, or fried calamari for an appetizer and a choice of chicken picatta or pan-seared Atlantic salmon for an entrée for $25.

Okra’s (9110 Center Street) brings a taste of New Orleans to Manassas. This Cajun Creole favorite will feature a different dinner special each day of Restaurant Week. Swing by to see what the day’s special entrée will be and enjoy it with the choice of an appetizer and dessert for $35 during dinner. 

Philadelphia Tavern (9413 Main Street) offers authentic Philly fare and boasts hoagie rolls that come straight from Amoroso Bakery. Grab a pal and enjoy two of their famous cheese steaks and two draught beers for $25 during both lunch and dinner.

The Bone (9420 Battle Street) is downtown’s home for smoky barbecue and hand-picked craft beers. Come by for a two-meat combo platter with Banana Puddin’ Pie for dessert and a local craft beer for $25. Choose from pork, brisket, turkey, chicken, or ribs and pair it with two sides and bread.

Note: The full menus at every restaurant will still be available in addition to the Restaurant Week special menu items, deals, and pricing.

What happens when lawyers update a database without a good backup?

  • JTC Inc.
  • Address: 9720 Capital Ct #305, Manassas, VA 20110
  • Phone: (703) 794-1225
  • Website: http://www.jtcinc.net/

When a lawyer walks into the courtroom, they need to know that they have all of their information and records they need. In many cases this is sensitive information that can have a big impact on a client’s case. But what if that information were to vanish during a system update?

This is something a law firm really can’t afford, when it comes to building their business, and providing a reputable service that clients can count on. And this is why law firms and lawyers need to have a good backup of all of their records and files available, in case something goes wrong.

“If you don’t have a backup, you’re taking a huge risk of losing data,” said JTC, Inc. spokeswoman Kristen Maxey.

If a lawyer is utilizing legal billing software or an electronic records platform, you’re going to have to update these programs from time to time, as updates and patches are released. And if you don’t utilize the services of an IT company, like JTC, Inc. you may end up accidentally wiping some of these crucial records.

Especially when you’re doing a big update to one of these databases, it’s important to have both a local and off-site backup of your records. That is something that JTC, Inc. can manage.

“You have the potential for corrupting files. Because when you’re updating a database, there are sometimes what’s called ‘schema’ changes, which is changes to the format of the database itself. When you do a large update like that, there’s always a risk or potential for corruption because you’re doing mass changes to the database,” said JTC, Inc. Solution Architect Chris Dittrich.

JTC, Inc. will not only help with installation, but they will manage and alert you about system updates, assist with the updating process, and maintain an off-site copy of the records you need.

As a growing business, don’t risk losing your data. Legal billing software can save you time, and JTC, Inc. can keep your software and databases backed up and secure.

News
Quantico Town bringing back craft fair

Once upon a time, the Town of Quantico had a craft fair.

It was time now perfectly encapsulated in an image that dates back nearly 40 years, showing hordes of people on Potomac Avenue shopping various craft booths, driving big cars, and wearing highwater pants.

Town Mayor Kevin Brown wants to recapture some of the magic of those glory days, this time, most likely, without the hiked-up pants.

“Everyone knows about the Occoquan annual craft shows, but most people don’t realize the Town of Quantico used to have a very successful annual craft show as well,” stated Brown in an email.

A craft show in Quantico would be one of a several events created events to draw more people to the only town in the nation located inside a military base. Those events include a new fishing tournament, kayak event on the Potomac River, fireworks and concert on Memorial Day, and the town’s annual Christmas parade.

Brown mentioned craft fairs in Occoquan, a town just north of Quantico. It relies on its two craft fairs, in the spring and fall, to generate revenue to support the town.

“Over the two day period, the show brings visitors from around the region to our town – they not only experience the town’s largest event, but they are also introduced to the many unique shopping, dining and artistic experiences that are available in Occoquan year round. This brings people back to our town throughout the year to shop, dine and experience the art and history of our community,” stated Occoquan Town Manager Kirstyn Jovanovich in an email.

Now in its 46th year, Occoquan’s craft show attract about 10,000 people to the town. The money generated by the shows is used to support the town’s capital improvement plan to improve streets, public buildings, sidewalks, and parks.

The Quantico Craft and Vendor Fair will be held Saturday, Sept. 19 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The fair will include over 28 local crafters and vendors from the surrounding community, stated Brown.

This event will be located in the town’s municipal parking lot (located next to the Navy Federal ATM) at 449 Potomac Avenue in Quantico.

Quantico fishing tournament winners

The results are in from the Town of Quantico’s fishing tournament

The tournament took place on Friday, Aug. 28 and Saturday, Aug. 29.

“The town continues to be committed to providing family friendly low cost events for residents and surrounding communities to enjoy,” said Quantico Mayor Kevin Brown. “We appreciate the support that Col Murray and Marine Corps Base Quantico provide to the Town of Quantico and the unique partnership we enjoy being the only town in America surrounded by a military installation.”

The results as provided to Potomac Local by the Town of Quantico: 

1st Place Team – Bass

Winner = Grateful Fishermen (Kirk Lowe & Geoffrey Land)

Total Length = 28 inches

1st Place Team – Snakehead

Winner = Grateful Fishermen (Kirk Lowe & Geoffrey Land)

Total Weight = 13.75 lbs.

1st Place Team – Catfish

Winner = Keep’In It Reel (Emmett Pilkington & Austin Maddox)

Total Weight = 78 lbs.

1st Place Individual – Bass

Winner = Stephen Morse

Total Length = 18 inches

How Chapel Springs is building a long-term relationship with Georgetown South in Manassas

Chapel Springs

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Eleven-year-old Edwin Martinez had been looking forward to the Georgetown South Family Day event on Saturday, August 22, but said the day turned out to be even better than expected.

Standing in line for the Wild Rapids inflatable water slide with a half-dozen friends, Edwin said the community’s pavilion area was like a party with lots of different ways to enjoy the day.

“I give it an A+,” he said of the event, which was hosted by Chapel Springs Assembly of God in partnership with Iglesia Vida.

Chapel Springs has hosted Family Day at Georgetown South since 2011 as a way to show the love of Jesus Christ to the community. This year’s free event featured the extremely popular Wild Rapids slide, two inflatable bounce houses and face painting along with hot dogs and “sno cones.”

Family Day is the culmination of a week-long day camp for children in Kindergarten through 5th grade and gives church members a chance to connect with the families of those children, said Pastor Doug Dreesen. It’s also an opportunity to inform residents about the weekly English as a Second Language (ESL) classes hosted by Chapel Springs at the Georgetown South Community Center.

“Our goal is to come and help transform the community, really, for Christ. We want to tell them Jesus loves them, and we’re here to be His hands and feet, Dreesen said, adding that Chapel Springs is building a long-term relationship with Georgetown South.

Susana Ladino has lived in Georgetown South for three years, and stopped at the pavilion with her 6-year-old after they saw a group of children running toward the event.

“It’s beautiful. It looks very organized,” Ladino said through an interpreter.

Laura Leon also attended with her children. Leon has lived in the community for 11 years and has attended Family Day in the past. Through an interpreter, she said she was happy to enjoy a meal while her children played.

Sitting at a picnic table in the shade while children were enjoying activities nearby, Chapel Springs member Libny Fierro opened a Spanish Bible and led those seated around her to take turns reading from the book of Ephesians.

Ephesians has wonderful instruction about how we should live everyday– things like watching what we say and wearing the “armor of God” – and that was thought-provoking for those at the picnic table, Fierro said.

Fierro and her new friend Norma Arriaga handed out nine Spanish Bibles before the event was over. Having Bibles in Spanish was wonderful, Arriaga said, because while an English Bible is fine for the younger generation, she prefers to read in Spanish.

Asked what she learned from her discussion with Fierro and others at the picnic table, Arriaga had a quick reply: “God has a purpose for us and we need to follow His example,” she said through an interpreter.

Many church-goers focus on who they know and what people are wearing instead of spiritual matters, so reading and discussing the book of Ephesians was eye-opening, Arriaga added.

Ed and Miriam Bosch attend Chapel Springs and are preparing to become missionaries to Ecuador. They both participated in the day camp and were on hand for Family Day to celebrate a successful week.

“It’s been an awesome experience,” Ed Bosch said.

Chapel Springs member Denise Propps also volunteered to help at the day camp. She said it was important to her to attend Family Day and meet the families of the children she saw all week, noting that one child ran up and hugged her and said she had been looking specifically for her.

“It’s all about building relationships with the community,” Propps said. “We were made for relationships. We were made to love one another.”

And by building relationships, when someone has a need, we can pray for them as someone who knows them and cares for them, she added.

“I love it. It’s really what He’s called us to do, Propps said.

-Written by Christine Rodrigo

News
How Marines can fish free at Quantico Classic tournament

The 2nd Annual Quantico Classic Fishing Tournament starts tomorrow.

The 2015 Quantico Classic Fishing Tournament is a 30-hour fishing tournament hosted by the Town of Quantico starting on Friday, August 28 at noon and ending on Saturday August 29 at 5 p.m.

The 2015 Quantico Classic Fishing Tournament is open to anglers of all ages, skill levels and physical ability.

To increase participation the Town of Quantico is offering a 50% discount on all registration fees until 2 p.m. Friday.

Also, any active duty Marine (or service member) who has the rank of Sgt (E-5) or below can fish for free.

All participants must complete and submit a registration and hold harmless form before being added to the official participants list

The tournament rules and registration form can be found at townofquantico.org.

Any questions or comments related to this or any other town sponsored event should be directed to Mayor Kevin Brown at 571-334-3432 or mayor@townofquantico.org.

News
Dumfries barbecue joint moves to Quantico gate

The Lazy Pig has moved from Dumfries to Triangle.

The roadside barbecue joint has been on Waters Lane in Dumfries for more than two years, but decided to expand into a bigger space on 18723 Fuller Heights Road – just outside the Quantico Marine Corps Base gate.

“We smoke all of our meats on location – brisket, pork, ribs…and we do Southern-style cuisine, as far as your collared greens. Everything we do is homemade,” said Lazy Pig owner Ken Harris.

Harris realized that as the business had grown, they didn’t have enough space to serve their customers at the Dumfries location.

“What we found is that our customer base has grown so fast…and we were actually missing just as many customers as we were servicing because of the parking and we didn’t have any inside seating,” said Harris.

The new location has 40 inside seats and 20 seats on the deck area outside.

“We wanted more space to be able to serve our customers,” Harris said.

As part of the business’ expansion, the Lazy Pig is now offering lunch specials from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will soon be offering a kid’s meal, according to Harris.

News
Woodbridge picnic table case tossed out

Disabled Marine veteran Mickey Triplett was nervous when he walked into the Prince William General District Court this morning.

But shortly after the court was called to order at 9 a.m., the Prince William Commonwealth’s Attorney Paul Ebert stood before the judge and called for ‘null process’ – a legal term that means that the court will not prosecute the case – for a destruction of property charge brought against Triplett for painting a picnic table at his former apartment complex.

Triplett had painted the deteriorating picnic table behind his building at Potomac Ridge Apartments in Woodbridge as a nice gesture before his granddaughter came to visit him in July.

The apartment complex, which is managed by Klingbeil Capital Management, decided to have Triplett charged with destruction of property for painting the table white, according to Prince William County General District Court documents.

Had the null process not been declared in court, Triplett could have faced a $2,500 fine or up to a year in jail, according to the Virginia Code.

Despite the case being dropped, Triplett’s lawyer Jason Pelt, may be filing a civil suit on Triplett’s behalf against Potomac Ridge Apartments for ‘malicious prosecution’.

According to Virginia law, a malicious prosecution case can be filed when an individual or group uses the judicial system with malicious intent, and for prosecution against someone without probable cause.

Ebert told Potomac Local this morning that he had received several calls proceeding this morning’s hearing, asking that he declare ‘null process’ for the case.

“I’m so relieved and so thankful to everyone that came out and helped me. I tried to do a good thing, and it got out of hand…I’ve been going through a rough time, and I’m happy about what happened in court today,” said Triplett.

News
Quantico man dies in 2-alarm apartment fire

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Update

Frank Anthony Desanto, 69, died inside his apartment Thursday when it caught fire in Quantico. 

Prince William County fire and rescue officials said improperly discarded smoking materials inside Desanto’s apartment was the cause of the blaze. The fire started inside a bedroom of the apartment. 

The fire caused $30,000 in damage, according to fire investigators. 

Fire crews rescued two people from the apartment complex using ground ladders, and three others were rescued using the stairs of the apartment complex.

Improperly discarded smoking materials are the leading cause of fire deaths in the U.S., according to Prince William County fire and rescue Chief Kevin McGee. 

Original post

Neighbors said the victim in an apartment fire had lived there for years. 

The unidentified man lived in an apartment at the intersection of Broadway Street and 2nd Avenue in Quantico. 

The 2-alarm blaze broke out about 7 a.m. Fire crews rushed to the scene.

“I was up and watching TV when I heard something. I thought it was the trash truck, but then I smelled the smoke,” said Travis Perry, who escaped the blaze with his wife and children.

Perry and his wife said they tried to help the victim escape, but “there was too much smoke,” Perry said.
Neighbors looked on as fire crews assessed the scene. An investigation will begin into the fire, and the scene will be turned over to police.

Prince William fire and rescue Chief Kevin McGee came to the scene.

Investigators had not confirmed the name or age of the victim.

More on this as we have it.

News
Marine Corps museum expansion underway

Marine Corps museum to close January through March 2016 

Marine Corps Museum Exbibit Chief Chuck Girbovan shows a rending of what a new exhibit hall will look like.
National Museum of the Marine Corps is expanding.
National Museum of the Marine Corps is expanding.
National Museum of the Marine Corps is expanding.

Work is underway at the National Museum of the Marine Corps to complete the circle.

A new 128,000 square-foot expansion of the iconic museum is slated to be finished by 2017. A new exhibit gallery, art gallery, and large format theater should be open to the public a year later.

“We get asked all the time, “where is the story of my unit” and “where is the equipment I used,” said Marine Corps Museum Exbibit Chief Chuck Girbovan.

The museum opened in 2006 and showcased the U.S. Marine Corps during the years 1775 to 1975, up to the Vietnam War. The new exhibit hall will immerse visitors in time periods to include the Persian Gulf War of 1990, and the conflicts in Iraq and Afganistan.

An Iraqi village will be constructed inside a new 24,000 square-foot exhibit hall. Visitors will see how the nature of combat changed between fighting in Vietnam to fighting in Iraq, where troops took on more of a peacekeeping role and worked alongside other nations who had troops on the ground, said Girbovan.

Also included in the new exampsion will be a “Hall of Valor” where Medal of Honor Recipients will be recognized. There will also be an art gallery featuring watercolors and pastel paintings created by Marines serving on the front lines depicting war.

A new large format 350-seat theater will also be built. It will show a film that showcases what it’s like to be a Marine on land and at sea.

The $69 million addition will complete the original planned circular layout of the museum. Earth movers just outside the building are clearing the way for the expansion that will require cutting into a portion of a thick concrete wall at the end of the final exhit hall.

The museum will close January through March 2016 — a departure from it’s regular operating hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day except Christmas — so curators can bring in new artifacts like a 55-ton M60 tank, and an FA18 fighter jet that must have its wing clipped just to fit inside the building.

The museum opened nearly 10 years ago and with a mission to first feature the World War II and Korea exhibits. The idea was to showcase Marines who fought in these conflicts to honor those Marines who are still alive today,

“As spectacular as this museum is today, the building is unfinished, and we are here completing the mission,” said Marine Corps Heritage Foundation President Lt. Gen. Robert R. Blackman.

The foundation will fund and coordinate construction of the new expansion just as it did the original $75 million first phase of the Marine Museum. It will then hand over the operation and care of the expansion to museum staff.

Afterward, the foundation will explore new ways to bring the story of the Marine Corps on the road, possibly in the form of a traveling exhibit to military bases and state fairs.

“We’re going to take the influence this museum has beyond Exit 150 on Highway 95,” said Blackman.

About 500,000 people visited the National Museum of the Marine Corps in 2014. About 53,000 of them were school children, and about half of those were from outside Virginia, said Blackman.

Museum officials expect Marines will continue to come from all over the U.S, to see the museum. They also hope area residents will return to the museum in 2018 to see the addition and the many new exhibits and artifacts that will be on display.

A ribbon cutting for the new expansion was held in March. Hundreds attended a special ceremony inside Leatherneck Hall. An backhoe was used to break ground on the new expansion.

News
Prince William County Fair opens

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The Prince William County Fair opens for its 2015 run tonight.

This is the 66th year for the county fair, which offers a little something for everyone — from carnival rides, animals, music, to demolition derby in the grandstand.

The runs Aug. 14 to 22 at the Prince William County Fairgrounds at 10624 Dumfries Road in Manassas. Everyone gets into the fair for $6 for opening night August, 14, 2015.

Here are the prices and special dates for the remainder of the fair:

General admission: $10
Child (ages5-13) and seniors (ages 60 or older) $6
Half-price day is Monday, Aug. 17, child/seniors $3 and adults $5
Tuesday is $2 admission, $2 per ride (no wristbands)
All ladies admitted free Wednesday, Aug. 19
All veterans admitted free Thursday, Aug. 20
Active duty military admitted free daily
There are several new attractions to the fair this year:

Welde’s Big Bear Show
Jeff Robbins Mountain Music
Ackmonster Chainsaw Artist
No-Joe’s Clown Circus
Jurassic Kingdom
Comedian Reggie Rice

The home arts exhibits are always popular at the Prince William County Fair. It’s where anyone can bring produce they’ve grown at home, food, and crafts into be judged. Prizes are awarded for everything from best-looking produce, best photography, best canned good, to tastiest jelly.

“The home arts department is a dying breed, especially here in Northern Virginia. It’s something that is truly unique to a county fair,” said spokeswoman Chrissy Taylor.

Some of the fair’s largest attractions — tractor pull, demolition derby, and “bulls ‘n barrels” show — will be featured in the grandstand and are free with admission.

Fair organizers listed this year’s events for the 10-day run.

News
Prince William shelter bursting with animals

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Jennette Skinner came to the animal shelter Wednesday in search of a new friend.

She adopted her pit bull from a shelter in Maryland, but he’s now passed on. She now hopes to rescue a small dog and a cat.

“We’ve always had big dogs, and now we want a small one because they’re easier to take care of,” said Skinner, of Manassas.

She was one of the several people lined up outside the door at the Prince William County Animal Shelter just before it opened at 11 a.m. There are about 200 animals inside the 40-year-old shelter to choose from, from dogs and cats to birds, and guinea pigs.

Summer is a busy time for the shelter, as the staff usually sees an influx of cats and other animals during the warmer months. Space here is at a premium, as the shelter wasn’t built to house as many animals as it does today.

About 2,000 animals per year came through the shelter when it opened in 1975. Today it sees about 6,000. Animals here are no longer euthanized due to space constraints.

“The way that sheltering has changed has created some problems with us,” said Suzette Kapp, head caretaker the shelter. “We don’t have enough space; we don’t have air circulation in some rooms,
and we’re understaffed.”

The shelter operates with about 40% fewer staff members than needed. Volunteers who filled out an online application and were later picked to work here help fill the void.

Dogs are usually adopted from shelters sooner than cats. But it was a cat Allison Wishon, of Purcellville, was searching for when she came to the Prince William shelter.

“We have two rescue cats at home, and we know there are so many more animals out there that don’t have homes,” said Wishon.

The shelter, and an animal shelter in Manassas, will participate in the “clear the shelters” adoption event on Saturday. It’s an event sponsored by NBC, and Kapp says she hopes national attention brought by the TV network will help to increase the number adoptions at the shelter.

The adoption event on Saturday is just one of several the shelter does over the course of the year. It also brings animals to festivals and fairs in the community, and posts photos of them on social media to get them adopted.

The shelter is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. Those who wish to adopt should bring ID with their address printed on it. Animals that are not spayed or neutered will be sent to an area veterinarian where the animal will undergo the procedure. Those who adopt will need to pay the shelter adoption fee of $45, and a $140 spay or neuter fee for dogs or $100 for cats.

Next month, the shelter will celebrate its 40th anniversary on September 27. Rescue groups, children’s activities, and raffles will be featured during the event that is aimed at bringing more people inside the shelter.

The Prince William County Animal Shelter is located at 14807 Bristow Road near Manassas, just off Route 234 across from the county’s animal shelter.

Manassas a magnet for creative, performing arts

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The Arts and Tourism District is in Historic Downtown Manassas.

Manassas already boasted the renowned Center for the Arts where visual and performing arts are taught, practiced and displayed as well as the highly regarded local studios and galleries, Creative Brush and ArtBeat. But local artists and community leaders wanted more.

The city council has a vision for Manassas to become known as an arts and cultural center in Northern Virginia, and beyond.

Last year the city converted the hallway on the first floor of City Hall into an art gallery aptly named “The Hall at City Hall.” The gallery has featured paintings, photographic art and works by local art students at Osborn High School and changes artwork every six weeks so there are regularly new displays.

Another example is the banner art displayed on light poles throughout Historic Downtown. The juried competition attracted artists from throughout the Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia. Sixty of the more than 130 entries were transformed into public art that is on display seasonally until winter.

Historic Manassas Inc., the city’s Virginia Main Street Program, oversaw the project and intends to repeat it annually. The top -ranked submission, as judged by a panel of professional artists, received a $1,000 cash prize and at the end of the season one artist will be awarded the “People’s Choice” prize of $500. Ballots for this are included in a brochure describing each piece and available at the City’s visitor center in the historic train station adjacent to the municipal parking garage.

But it’s not all just about the visual arts.

Manassas also boasts the second largest ballet company in Virginia. The work of the Manassas Ballet Theater is recognized in the national and international press.

This attention helps contribute to Manassas becoming known as a regional arts and tourist destination. Further, Manassas worked closely with George Mason University, the Commonwealth of Virginia, and Prince William County to bring the Hylton Performing Arts Center from dream to reality. The city continues to provide support to ensure the performing arts venue remains an asset for the citizens of Manassas and the surrounding area as well as attracting visitors.

There are many other local performing and visual arts groups and businesses in the city too numerous to mention in this article; all of which exist to teach, promote or display the vibrant culture of this historic yet modern city.

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