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Lifestyle

Mill Hosting Last Demonstration of the Year

The Town of Occoquan

Visit the Occoquan Historical Society‘s Mill House Museum this Sunday, October 5, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., for the last Milling Demonstration of the year. Children will have the opportunity to use a hand-turned mill to grind wheat into flour and then take home the flour they mill, seeds to plant, and a recipe for “Mill House Millies.”

Visitors on Sunday will also have an opportunity to meet local children’s author, Jamey M. Long, who later in the month will be holding a writing clinic for elementary school children.  Sponsored by the Occoquan Historical Society, the writing clinic will take place on October 25 at the Occoquan Town Hall.  During a 90-minute class, children will develop their own story line and character.  Registration is $25 and class times are at 10:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. on the 25th.  All supplies are provided and young authors will leave with a signed copy of Jamey’s book, Johnny Appleseed.

To register for the class in advance, call the Mill House Museum daily at 703-491-7525 between 11:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.  The child’s name, age, address, phone number, and an adult contact are required.  You may also email the required information to: curator@occoquanhistoricalsociety.org.  Limited same-day registration is also available.

Date for Next Marumsco Creek Clean Up Announced

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Volunteers ready for annual clean up at Woodbridge park

 

Prince Williams Trails and Streams Coalition, in conjunction with the Prince William Soil and Water Conservation District and the Prince William County Parks and Recreation Department, invites volunteers ages 10 and over to the Marumsco Creek Cleanup.

The Marumsco Creek cleanup will be held on Saturday, Nov 8, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon  at Veterans Park, located at 14300 Featherstone Road in Woodbridge. Sign-in on the day of the event at the large pavilion in Veterans Park which is across from the Community Center. Bathroom facilities, trash bags, gloves, water and refreshments are provided.

For questions and pre-registration, e-mail education@pwswcd.org. Pre-registration is appreciated but not required unless you are bringing a group. The Prince William Soil and Water Conservation District (PWSWD) is also looking for volunteers for its Adopt-A-Stream program. For more information on the Adopt-A-Stream program, please visit the PWSWD website at www.pwswcd.orgor e-mail the education coordinator at education@pwswcd.org.

For cancellation due to weather, please call 703-491-2183. ( Veteran’s Park office)

Potomac Local Pets

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Bandit

is an affectionate boy who is always ready to play. He is a lab mix with a beautiful black coat and  a gentle, sweet disposition. Lots of adorable puppy energy. Estimated DOB is mid February 2014. Healthy and up to date on shots, he is ready to bring endless joy to his forever home

Spice

She is the cutest thing! Spice is a very social and affectionate 3 year old female who still quite kittenish. She has been spayed and is UTD on all her shots and ready for her forever home!

Found

Beautiful female Pitbull found stray on 610 West by the golf driving range. No tags. No collar. No microchip. Very distinctive markings. Very people friendly but also hyper and very excitable. If anyone recognizes this pup, please call 540-842-9936.

-Information provided by the Stafford SPCA. Contact them for more information on any of the animals shown above. 

Girl, 13, Saves Mother, Children During Seizure

stafford sheriff van bravery commendation

Stafford County Sheriff Charles E. Jett commends 13-year-old Kyleigh Brianne Ash after she assumed control of her mother’s van in an emergency.

 

Child credited with saving lives of family members

 

Kyleigh Brianne Ash was sitting in the backseat of her mother’s van and could tell something was wrong.

Her mother, Jennifer Janickie, began having a seizure while behind the wheel while driving 13-year-old Kyleigh to class at H.H. Pool Middle School in North Stafford. In the backseats were Kyleigh, her infant sister and toddler brother.

In an instant, Kyleigh jumped out of her seat, across her brother and sister, and then into the lap of her mother. Kyleigh then took control of the van traveling on Garrisonville Road, applied the brakes, and steered the van to a stop near the intersection of Center Street.

Kyleigh, her brother and sister, escaped unscathed, and their grandmother was called to come pick up the children from the scene. Janickie was taken to a local hospital where several tests were run, but doctors were unable to determine why she had the seizure, her first ever, she added.

A short time later, the Stafford County Sheriff’s Office presented Kyleigh with a commendation for her actions.

“Had Kyleigh not taken control of the vehicle it is very likely that the van would have passed into oncoming traffic and resulted in serious, if not threatening injury to the occupants of the vehicle,” said sheriff’s spokesman Bill Kennedy.

Sheriff Charles E. Jett presented the 13-year-old with an award for her bravery at the county’s public safety center on Courthouse Road.

“It’s just mind blowing,” said Janickie. “I didn’t think she would know what to do for something like that. A lot of people wouldn’t know what to do if something like that happened, and I’m very thankful for what she did.”

So thankful, Kyleigh’s mom took her to Maggie Moos, her favorite ice cream shop, to celebrate.

Lake Ridge Church Counts 400 Waiting at Door for Charity Event

Lake Ridge Church Latter Day Saints Charity Sale

Church fills tables with linen, toys, games for community

 

On Friday, Sept. 12, the chapel of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Old Bridge Road in Woodbridge, filled with 120 teens and many adults preparing for the annual community Gifts of the Heart event. 

Sister Pam Gauch, the Relief Society President for the local Woodbridge Virginia Stake, addressed them briefly to explain the spiritual nature of the service they were about to perform.

“The important thing is to keep things moving,” said Gauch.

The youth, some of whom were not of the LDS faith, then spent the next two hours unloading donated items from cars, trunks, and the backs of minivans. Soon tables in the large church gym were piled with clothes, another room filled with shoes, others with linens, toys and games.  Well over 1,100 volunteer hours went into orchestrating this year’s Gifts of the Heart clothing exchange, a free event open to the public that is done in conjunction with the Day to Serve project. 

The community donated all of the items available at the exchange. Additionally, during Gifts of the Heart, the community also donated over 240 pounds of food for the Action in Community Through Service (ACTS) food pantry.

“This year I brought a friend from school.  It’s a good representation of what our church is about: family, service, the pure love of Christ,” said Rebecca Prymak, a 16-year-old junior at Gar-Field Senior High School.  This was her fourth year volunteering during Gifts of the Heart. A total of 148 youth, and 264 adults volunteered to make the event possible.

When the doors opened the next day at 9 a.m., there were over 400 people in line.  Many had come early, in hopes of finding certain needed items. 

“If you’re looking for something you really need, you’ll find it here,” said volunteer Will Marda, of Lake Ridge. 

“This is our fourth time coming.  If something doesn’t fit, we always pass it on.  This year we’re looking for winter coats and shoes,” said Michelle Sackrider, sifting through the wares. 

“It’s a beautiful thing to do, especially for free, it helps everyone,” said Digna Ruiz, through a translator, of Woodbridge.

This was her second year benefiting from items that the community donated to Gifts of the Heart. By the time the event ended, and all of the left-over, donated clothing and other things were packed into a truck for AmVets, more than 1,150 people were able to shop the Gifts of the Heart exchange.

 

Editors note: This story was submitted by the community relations department at the Church of Latter Day Saints in Woodbridge.

Stafford Shred It Event to Benefit Crime Solvers

Stafford County Crime Solvers announces the “Stafford Shred It Program- Drive Thru Style.”

The event is an opportunity for the citizens of Stafford County to shred unwanted documents, receipts or other official papers.  For $5 a box of papers, residents can come to the Stafford County Sheriff’s Office Parking Lot at 1225 Courthouse Road and have their unwanted papers shredded on Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014 from 8 a.m. until noon.

The limit for shredding is 100 pounds per vehicle with the proceeds of the day going to Stafford Crime Solvers.  If anyone has any questions feel free to contact Sgt. Darrell English at 540-658-4428.  This event will be held rain or shine. 

Brentsville History Preserved at Courthouse Historic Centre

Underground railroad brentsville courthouse prince william visit

Prince William’s history traced to courthouse, farmland in Brentsville District 

 

Brentsville was established in 1820 to serve as the county seat of Prince William County. As residents moved west to farm, the original county seat in Dumfries was just too far for them to travel to.

Today, Brentsville’s history is preserved at the Brentsville Courthouse Historic Centre- a 28-acre site residents and visitors can explore. The site includes a former Union Church, the old courthouse and jail, a circa 1928 one-room schoolhouse and the 1850 Haislip-Hall House.

The Prince William courthouse and jail tell the story of the increased resistance to slavery by both black and white Americans. Part of the Underground Network to Freedom, these sites are where runaway bondsmen and abolitionists were arrested and jailed from the 1820s until 1862. Thirteen executions were recorded here, 12 of which were against African Americans. One enslaved woman, Agness, was executed after killing her master. Today, she allegedly still haunts the property.

Just down the street from the courthouse, residents and visitors can walk the hallowed ground where the Battle of Bristoe Station unfolded during the Civil War. In the fall of 1863, Gen. Robert E Lee returned to Prince William to fight one of his last offensive campaigns of the Civil War on this ground.

Thanks to a grant from the state tourism office, Prince William County’s Historic Preservation Division will launch the Bristoe Station Campaign Mobile Tour this year, which will utilize technology to connect visitors to the rich history of the battlefield.

Using their cell phone, visitors will be able to stop at various stations on the battlefield and listen to 90-second narratives about the people and battles that unfolded at Bristoe more than 150 years ago.

In nearby Bristow, the once quiet area known for a Civil War battle has become a bustling suburb full of single family homes and shopping just outside Manassas. The residential communities of Saybrooke and Braemar, located on Lake Manassas and it’s Robert Trent Jones Golf Course, are located in Bristow.

In the Village of Nokesville, this area is surrounded by farms — which has been a way of life here for hundreds of years. The Civil War Battle of Kettle Run took place near here, and Nokesville — once accessed by passenger rail — is still served by busy Route 28, making it one of the first stops in Prince William County for those headed east.

Nokesville Elementary School dates back to 1929, it recently closed to make way for Prince William County’s very first school to house grades kindergarten through 8th. Once construction of the new school is finished, it will sit next to longstanding Brentsville District High School.

Emergency services

The Prince William County Fire and Rescue Department responds to 911 calls for emergencies from 6 a.m. until 6 p.m. and has some 24-hour staff at fire stations in the county. Volunteer fire and rescue crews respond to calls from 6 p.m. until 6 a.m. and on holidays. Police services are provided by Prince William Police Department. For non-emergency situations, residents can visit one of two police stations — The Eastern District Station in Woodbridge and the Western District Station in Manassas. Call 703-792-6500 for more info.  

Pets

Dogs 4-months-old or older must be licensed by January 31 of each year. The $10 licenses can be purchased beginning in November at the Prince William County Taxpayer Services Office at the McCoart Government Center, at the County Animal Shelter, or by mail. Call the Animal Shelter for more info: 703-792-6465.

Snow removal

Snow removal is handled by the Virginia Department of Transportation. Snow is removed first from roads with the highest traffic volumes, from Interstate Highways to neighborhood streets. Call 1-800-367-7623 for more info.

Leaf removal, recycling, trash disposal

Trash and leaf collection is performed by privately licensed waste removal companies in Prince William County. Residents should contact a licensed private waste removal provider. Residents may choose to dispose of waste at the County Landfill with a solid waste decal. Call 703-792-6710 for more info.

Population

Brentsville, Bristow, and Nokesville lie in Prince William County’s Brentsville District which had 79,541 residents in the 2010 Census. By 2012, it’s estimated 430,289 people lived in Prince William County.

Taxes

Personal property taxes on vehicles, trailers, and motorcycles are due on Oct. 5 of the year. Personal property tax statements are mailed each spring.  For real estate taxes, the first half of the year’s taxes are due July 15 and the second Dec. 5. Real estate assessments begin Jan. 1, and assessment notices mailed by late winter.

Vehicle decals

Prince William County does not require decals to be displayed on vehicles. Vehicles must be registered with Taxpayer Services upon moving in and moving out of the area by calling 703-792-6710. A $24 charge for cars/trucks, and a $12 charge for motorcycles will be billed along with personal property taxes.

Voting

The Voter Registration Office is open 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. During General Elections held every November in Virginia, you must be registered to vote 22 days before Election Day to vote. Call 703-792-6470 for more info.

Water and sewer

Prince William County Service Authority and Dale City Virginia American Water handle water and sewer utilities in the county. Call 703-335-7900 or 703-491-2136, respectively, for more info.

Editor’s note: This column is written by Discover Prince William / Manassas and is posted to Potomac Local under a special content-sharing agreement. 

Potomac Local Pets

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Laila:

Laila is a Terrier mix that looks like a mini Rottweiler. She weighs in at just over 12# and we guess that she may top out at approximately 20# when she’s an adult. Laila is a housebreaking superstar, is up to date on her shots, per her age and is ready to meet her new family!

Diamond:

What a sweet face! Diamond is a muted tortie who is an amazing, social kitty. She is spayed,UTD on all her shots and that gets along wonderfully with other cats, dogs and kids of all ages.

Scooter is still Missing!
A Beagle  in the area of Choptank Road and Brian Court in the Vista Woods neighborhood in North Stafford. Scooter is an older neutered, male with tri-colored ticking. He is overweight and has a Camp collar please contact Denise at 540-834-7090.

Didlake Reception Draws Donors to Blue Ridge Foothills

Didlake disabilities manassas reception pentagon

Didlake, Inc. held a donor reception to say thank you to those who help the company in its mission to employ and educate those with disabilities .

Didlake holds donor reception at Salamander Resort

 

Some of Didlake, Inc.’s biggest donors went to the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains on Sunday for a special reception.

They gathered at the Salamander Resort and Spa in Middleburg to hear stories of those with disabilities – stories of people who Didlake has helped because of their generous support of the Manassas-based non-profit organization.

An intimate gathering, about 60 people came to the event called the Didlake Donor Appreciation Ceremony.

Through its many contracts, the company offers several services including mail, transpiration, recycling, grounds maintenance, and it is the sole janitorial provider at the Pentagon in Arlington.

Didlake will turn 50 years old next year. It was found founded in 1965 in Manassas when several people who were disgruntled with the public schools refusal to admit students with disabilities banded together to start a roadside fireworks stand to raise funds to send children to a special school.

Over the next year, the company will begin its search for a new CEO, replacing Rex Parr who has served in the leadership position since 1977. The new CEO will be in place by 2017, according to the company’s website.

The company operates in locations in the Washington, D.C. metro area, in Virginia’s Roanoke Valley, and in the Hampton Roads region in southeastern Virginia. The company has 1,200 employees at its work locations and has an annual operating budget of $50 million, according to its website.

Woodbridge Residents Awarded Scholarships

Two Prince William County residents have been awarded scholarships from the Shepherd University Foundation.

Woodbridge residents include Deon R. Jones, who received the Moler General Scholarship, and Isaiah A. Tetteh, who received the Shepherd Fund Scholarship.

The Shepherd University Foundation provided more than $1 million in student and program support in 2013-14. These funds support approximately 400 scholarships that are awarded to deserving Shepherd students each academic year.

Located in West Virginia’s Eastern Panhandle, Shepherd University is a public liberal arts university. Shepherd is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association.

Young Female High School Mechanic Gets an Education Working on Cars

Female High School Mechanic Picked to Work on CarsFemale High School Mechanic Performing an alignmentHometowne Auto Repair and Tire of WoodbridgeKatie Tatum from Hylton High School from Woodbridge, Virginia

 

Female High School Mechanic Picked to Work on Cars

 

Take one look across the automotive bay at Hometowne Auto and Tire and you’ll notice something unusual.

No, it’s not unusual because there’s a female working in the shop, finding a woman working in an auto shop is more common that it used to be. It’s because this female, Katie Tatum, 17, is one of the top automotive students at C.D. Hylton High School in Woodbridge. And, unlike others her working jobs at retail stores or a fast food shop, Katie is getting paid to work under the hood.

Three days a week, Tatum can be found working alongside the other mechanics at Hometowne Auto and Tire on U.S. 1 in Woodbridge. Working on autos is something that comes natural to Tatum. In kindergarten, you could find her in the garage handing her father tools while he was changing the oil on their family cars.

As time progressed, the two continue to work on cars together. “We have a jeep that we tinker on together. We used to have a Land Cruiser but we had to sell that because it was eating up our money by a lot. It is in Utah now,” said Tatum.

Tatum has excelled in sports and rowed for both the boys and girls crew team at Woodbridge Senior High School. After transferring to Hylton last year, which has a specialized automotive program, that’s when the opportunity of being an auto mechanic took center stage.

When it comes to sheer size, Katie is smaller that the other guys that surround her in the shop. And that’s OK, because she’s already shown that she can hold her own on the floor.

“Some people come in and think the job is going to be easy,” said Ray Dezeeu, who is training Katie. He also is relatively new to the automotive field after graduating from a 2-year apprenticeship at Germanna Community College in Fredericksburg, under the guidance of ST Billingsley, owner of Hometowne Auto Repair and Tire. Dezeeu says Katie has the right attitude and drive to fit in well.

“Because she is smaller and weighs less than the other guys, her weight makes a difference because sometimes you have to putt your weight and strength into breaking bolts…but we’ve all accepted her and its kind of alike a big family.”

Being accepted and working at an automotive shop while still in high school is not something that came easy for her. Before being hired at Hometowne, Katie interviewed with three other shops. Those meetings were arranged by her high school automotive teacher who said Tatum is one of the most talented students in his class.

“No one was giving her a shot,” said C.D. Hylton High School automotive teacher Eddie Stevens. “I know her personality and worked with her for over a year, and I kinda had the feeling she was a bad interviewer, but I didn’t want to think that was the case.”

Stevens doesn’t send every student of his out to interview at shops. It’s mainly the high school students with a keen interest in the learning more about the business, and that’s worked out to be about three to five students over a 3-year time span.

It’s Katie’s senior year of high school and when she graduates she hopes to go onto Ohio Technical College in Cleveland. The two-year program will give her even more training in the field, and she’ll graduate with a degree after two years of work.

At Hometowne, being the youngest person in the shop, not to mention the only female, doesn’t faze her.

“There’s always going to be someone better than you,” said Tatum. “I try not to compare myself to other people unless they’re competition, but compare yourself to how you were in the past and try to better yourself.”

Stafford County Fire and Rescue Dept. Teams with Operation Warm to Provide Winter Coats to Children

STAFFORD, Va. – Did you know just $35 can buy a new warm winter coat for a child?

The Stafford County Fire and Rescue Department has teamed with several area organizations to provide winter coats to children for the upcoming winter season. And, if this winter is anything like the brutal cold and snow that befell us last year and kept children out of school for days on end, they’re going to need them.

“To date, Operation Warm has given new winter coats…throughout America. We invite you to be-come our partner, a hero in your community, and help us ensure that all children feel warm, healthy and valued,” Stafford fire and rescue spokesman Mark Doyle stated in a press release.

The Operation Warm organization aims to provide winter coats for more than 1.7 million children across the U.S. by the end of the year. Doyle said that, locally, the fire department is teaming with the following organizations to help get coats to kids who need them:

Stafford Professional Fire-fighters Association Local 4012

Stafford County Public Schools

Apple Federal Credit Union

The Wawa Foundation

Walmart Stores

“Providing brand new winter coats brings families facing challenges closer to reaching their goal of financial independence. Through community-based partner-ships, Operation Warm provides families with brand new winter coats for their children,” stated Doyle.

Donations can be made online

Greater Prince William Food Council Launches at Manassas Center for the Arts at the Candy Factory

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MANASSAS, Va. — Prince William County’s newly formed group that will focus on food, and on how to help those who aren’t getting enough of it,  launched Thursday.

The Greater Prince William Food Council held a special ceremony at the Center for the Arts at the Candy Factory in Manassas to announce their plan to work with area food banks, schools, business, and individuals, to tackle the problem of hunger in the community.

 

Greater Prince William Food Council Launches as New Community Service

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MANASSAS, Va. – Prince William County’s newly formed group that will focus on food, and on how to help those who aren’t getting enough of it,  launched Thursday.

The Greater Prince William Food Council held a special ceremony at the Center for the Arts at the Candy Factory in Manassas to announce their plan to work with area food banks, schools, business, and individuals, to tackle the problem of hunger in the community.

The new community service organization aims to bring multiple organizations together whose mission is to feed hungry county residents.

 

Quantico Hosting Blockade Run Kayak and SUP Races

QUANTICO, Va. – The Town of Quantico is pleased to partner with the Ft. Belvior/Quantico Chapter of Team River Runner and the American Canoe Association (ACA) in hosting the 2nd Annual Blockade Run Kayak and SUP Races on Saturday Sept. 20, from 3 to 7 p.m. 

This event will include the following races: 1K kayak race, 1K kayak 4-person team relay race, 1K SUP race, 1K SUP 4-person team relay, 250M Kids kayak race and 250M Kids SUP race. An awards ceremony will follow the races.

All equipment will be provided and is included in the registration fee. The registration fee for this event is $20 for adults, kids race for free. Same day registration will be available on race day. This event is open to the public.

Children eight years old and over are welcome to participate but must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. This event will be held at Raftelis Potomac River Park 408 River Road in Quantico. Team River Runner (TRR), a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, gives active duty service-members and veterans an opportunity to find health, healing, and new challenges through whitewater boating and other paddling sports. Participants/individuals wishing to learn more about the mission of Team River Runner are encouraged to visit www.teamriverrunner.org. 

To register, please contact Mayor Kevin Brown at cell/text (571) 334-3432 or mayor@townofquantico.org. Find out more about this and other town events by visiting www.townofquantico.org or by searching for “Town of Quantico” on Facebook.

RACSB Plans Stafford Open House

STAFFORD, Va. – The Rappahannock Area Community Services Board (RACSB) will host a series of open house events their five outpatient clinics. The events are an opportunity for RACSB to provide local and state elected officials as well as community members with an update on the community-based mental health, intellectual disability, substance abuse, prevention, and early intervention services offered by RACSB. 

An event in Stafford will be held on Wednesday, October 29 at the Stafford County Clinic, Charles A. Cooper Building, 15 Hope Road from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Friends Bid Longtime Dale City Resident, Potomac Local Columnist Connie Moser Farewell

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WOODBRIDGE, Va. – Friends gathered at Bahama Breeze at Potomac Mills mall in Woodbridge to bid farewell to Connie Moser. 

Moser is leaving her home of more  than 20 years in Dale City for a new home in Indiana. Many who came to the farewell event said they are sad to see Moser leave, and wondered who will take over the many roles Moser held in the community, from events coordinator to neighborhood clean-up captain.

Moser will continue to publish her column here on Potomac Local as long as she likes.

Moshos a Dedicated Swimmer, Student

MANASSAS, Va. – What you do know about Reni Moshos is that she is a phenomenal swimmer.

She is currently being recruited by some of the top colleges in the nation, including University of Florida and University of Arizona.  

What you don’t know about Moshos is that she also excels in the classroom, and was recently named to the 2013-14 USA Swimming Scholastic All-America Team, with a 3.5 grade point average.  

She enjoys sports movies where athletes overcome obstacles and succeed as a team, has played on a travel volleyball team and after a challenging swim meet, can be seen scarfing down a snack wrap with fries and a McFlurry from McDonald’s.

Reni began her love of swimming when she was six years old.  She enjoyed the water, but sought out the competitive spirit that embodies those who participate and watch the sport. So when her father, James, offered up the opportunity for her to swim full time in a competitive nature, she dove in — literally.

Reni is a junior at Highland School in Warrenton.  Along with participating on her school’s swim team, she’s also a member of her travel swim club, Nation’s Capital Swim Club (NCAP), with some meets being held at the Freedom Aquatic Center in Manassas, VA.

 “You know a lot of the people you are swimming against, so you work hard not to lose to anyone,” said Moshos.

This April, Moshos faced a challenging obstacle while participating with her swim club in Arizona competing in the Grand Prix swim meet.  The first day was a success, but the second day proved to be a hurdle for each of the members of her relay team who did not swim well.  

“After our coach talked sat us all down and spoke to us, we were able to go and swim fast and strong,” says Moshos.  

They didn’t win, but the team worked together to perform better by the conclusion of the meet.

“Even though it’s still a meet and there are a high level of swimmers there, we still have to perform at our best and try our best.”

Moshos credits much of her success to her parents, James and Olympia Moshos, because they encourage her to do her best and drive her wherever swimming dictates they travel.

“My parents are extremely supportive,” comments Reni.  “After I have a bad swim they critique what I did well and what I didn’t. They are like my coaches in a way.”  

Along with her parents the instructional support provided by her coach, Jeremy Linn, is the extra key to her success.  

“He knows how far to push me,” says Moshos.  As a 1996 Olympian, Reni is confident that Linn can show her the skills necessary to get her there too, “He definitely knows what I need to do and what it takes to get [to the Olympics].”

There is no off-season for Moshos other than a two week break in summer.  Swimming takes place all year round.  

When there is no off-season, athletes go from good to great much like Reni and her fellow teammates.  Workouts are usually daily and consist of plyometrics, ab and core work, aerobics and distance running.

A strength for Moshos is her ability to get excited about her relay splits in the 200 meter freestyle even more than her individual races; her best time of 23.01” with her 50 meter portion of the race.

“I get really excited about having the team aspect,” says Moshos, “because it boosts my confidence and gets me ready.”

For now, Moshos sets her sights on graduating from Highland School and working hard in her studies.  Attending a prestigious university is also on her horizon, but she knows she will still be actively involved in the sport of swimming.  

“I can see myself as a coach or mentor.  I don’t think I can ever fully leave it [swimming],” says Reni who has the talent to be a viable candidate for the 2016 or 2018 Summer Olympics.

Reni encourages younger athletes who want to explore the swimming world and try their hands at competitive swimming.  “Make sure you are happy with it and want to be there. In the end, it’s a lot of commitment to yourself and a team,” states Moshos.

Fall for the Book: Haute Cuisine at the Hylton is Sept. 18

 

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Miller

091514-fall-for-bookMANASSAS, Va. – Read Manassas author Belinda Miller’s Winterfrost, part of the Phillip’s Quest Series, and you may find yourself whipping up a batch of Ivy’s Tater Dumplings (gnocchi) with Phillip’s Hazelnut Sauce (marinara with hazelnuts) in the kitchen. It’s her mother’s recipe, and it’s in the back of the book. You’ll find the recipe for her mother’s Pine Nut Cookies (Amaretti con Pignoli) in her newest book, Above the Stars.

“Those are three recipes she always served at Christmas,” said Miller. “They mean ‘familia’ – family.”

Belinda Miller is one of the featured writers at Haute Cuisine at the Hylton, a Fall for the Book event this Thursday, Sept. 18 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Hylton Performing Arts Center, 10960 George Mason Circle, Manassas, on the Prince William Campus of George Mason University. The event is free.

While Miller talks with fans of Ragwort Chronicles, Chef Anthony, a friend and former chef at the Stanley Hotel in Estes, Colorado, will be handing out samples of her gnocchi with hazelnut sauce, prepared by Miller’s friends, Ciro D’Augustino, of Ciro’s Italian Pizzeria in Centreville and Andy Travers (100 pignoli). “They wouldn’t let me cook,” she said.

Novelist Claudia Lefeve will bring her new Texas-based crime novel, “Destined for Trouble, a Jules Cannon Mystery,” to the at the Hylton event, along with her husband, Dave Lefeve, a chef at The Cock and Bowl restaurant in Occoquan. Chef Dave will be serving samples of scallop ceviche, a dish featured in the fictional town of Trouble Island, where Lefeve’s main character comes to the rescue of a friend who is the prime suspect in the murder of a local restaurant owner. Haute Cuisine at the Hylton is all about mixing up food and fiction or, at least, flair.

Claudia Lefeve

Claudia Lefeve

The event starts at 6:15 p.m. with a food writing workshop led by Jason Shriner, the Aubergine Chef, familiar to many for his popular and affordable baking classes at the Manassas Park Community Center.

At 7 p.m., headlining novelist Laura Florand takes the stage to discuss her bestselling and award-winning Amour et Chocolat series, including The Chocolate Thief, The Chocolate Kiss, and more. Now a lecturer at Duke University, Florand is very dedicated to her research into French chocolate.

For patrons who with that sudden craving for chocolate, at 7:30 p.m.,individual stations open for tastings, demonstrations, and discussions by a variety of chefs and food celebrities, including Robert Kingsbury of Kingsbury Chocolates and Confections, distributed throughout No.Va. and D.C.; Amy Riolo, author of The Mediterranean Diabetes Cookbook, and Joe Yonan, food and travel editor of The Washington Post and the author of Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook.

Miguel Pires, owner of Zandra’s Taqueria, and recognized as Top 40 Under 40 Rising Stars in Full Service Restaurants Magazine in March 2014, will be giving patrons a sneak peek at the fare available at his new restaurant opening in historic downtown Manassas.

Representatives of Heritage Brewing Company will offer samples of their organic and locally sourced craft beers, direct from the tasting room of the veteran owned and operated microbrewery on the outskirts of Historic Manassas. They’ll be sharing news about their new “Freedom Isn’t Free” canning line.

Recently appointed Prince William County Poet Laureates Robert Scott and Alexandra “Zan” Hailey will be in the house, sharing original food poems and the latest news about their ongoing community outreach – Zan’s Ekphrasis program and Robert’s 10,000 Poems project. Both just returned from making waves in Williamsburg as part of a Poetry Society of Virginia event.

The second annual Haute Cuisine at the Hylton is sponsored by Write by the Rails, the Prince William Chapter of the Virginia Writers Club.

Admission is free and open to the public.

For more information on the complete schedule of Fall for the Book events—taking place Sept. 11-18 at George Mason University and at locations throughout VA, DC, and MD—visit www.fallforthebook.org.

Fall for the Book: Haute Cuisine at the Hylton is Sept. 18

 

Miller

Miller

091514-fall-for-bookMANASSAS, Va. – Read Manassas author Belinda Miller’s Winterfrost, part of the Phillip’s Quest Series, and you may find yourself whipping up a batch of Ivy’s Tater Dumplings (gnocchi) with Phillip’s Hazelnut Sauce (marinara with hazelnuts) in the kitchen. It’s her mother’s recipe, and it’s in the back of the book. You’ll find the recipe for her mother’s Pine Nut Cookies (Amaretti con Pignoli) in her newest book, Above the Stars.

“Those are three recipes she always served at Christmas,” said Miller. “They mean ‘familia’ – family.”

Belinda Miller is one of the featured writers at Haute Cuisine at the Hylton, a Fall for the Book event this Thursday, Sept. 18 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Hylton Performing Arts Center, 10960 George Mason Circle, Manassas, on the Prince William Campus of George Mason University. The event is free.

While Miller talks with fans of Ragwort Chronicles, Chef Anthony, a friend and former chef at the Stanley Hotel in Estes, Colorado, will be handing out samples of her gnocchi with hazelnut sauce, prepared by Miller’s friends, Ciro D’Augustino, of Ciro’s Italian Pizzeria in Centreville and Andy Travers (100 pignoli). “They wouldn’t let me cook,” she said.

Novelist Claudia Lefeve will bring her new Texas-based crime novel, “Destined for Trouble, a Jules Cannon Mystery,” to the at the Hylton event, along with her husband, Dave Lefeve, a chef at The Cock and Bowl restaurant in Occoquan. Chef Dave will be serving samples of scallop ceviche, a dish featured in the fictional town of Trouble Island, where Lefeve’s main character comes to the rescue of a friend who is the prime suspect in the murder of a local restaurant owner. Haute Cuisine at the Hylton is all about mixing up food and fiction or, at least, flair.

Claudia Lefeve

Claudia Lefeve

The event starts at 6:15 p.m. with a food writing workshop led by Jason Shriner, the Aubergine Chef, familiar to many for his popular and affordable baking classes at the Manassas Park Community Center.

At 7 p.m., headlining novelist Laura Florand takes the stage to discuss her bestselling and award-winning Amour et Chocolat series, including The Chocolate Thief, The Chocolate Kiss, and more. Now a lecturer at Duke University, Florand is very dedicated to her research into French chocolate.

For patrons who with that sudden craving for chocolate, at 7:30 p.m.,individual stations open for tastings, demonstrations, and discussions by a variety of chefs and food celebrities, including Robert Kingsbury of Kingsbury Chocolates and Confections, distributed throughout No.Va. and D.C.; Amy Riolo, author of The Mediterranean Diabetes Cookbook, and Joe Yonan, food and travel editor of The Washington Post and the author of Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook.

Miguel Pires, owner of Zandra’s Taqueria, and recognized as Top 40 Under 40 Rising Stars in Full Service Restaurants Magazine in March 2014, will be giving patrons a sneak peek at the fare available at his new restaurant opening in historic downtown Manassas.

Representatives of Heritage Brewing Company will offer samples of their organic and locally sourced craft beers, direct from the tasting room of the veteran owned and operated microbrewery on the outskirts of Historic Manassas. They’ll be sharing news about their new “Freedom Isn’t Free” canning line.

Recently appointed Prince William County Poet Laureates Robert Scott and Alexandra “Zan” Hailey will be in the house, sharing original food poems and the latest news about their ongoing community outreach – Zan’s Ekphrasis program and Robert’s 10,000 Poems project. Both just returned from making waves in Williamsburg as part of a Poetry Society of Virginia event.

The second annual Haute Cuisine at the Hylton is sponsored by Write by the Rails, the Prince William Chapter of the Virginia Writers Club.

Admission is free and open to the public.

For more information on the complete schedule of Fall for the Book events—taking place Sept. 11-18 at George Mason University and at locations throughout VA, DC, and MD—visit www.fallforthebook.org.

Novant Health Announces ‘TrueBeam’ as Cancer Treatment Option

091514-novant-cancer-center

GAINESVILLE, Va. – Novant Health’s cancer center in in Gainesville has added a new tool to its center at the entrance of Lake Manassas.

The “TrueBeam” system is designed to perform sophisticated surgeries, and it will expand the treatment options for those with challenging cases of cancer, according to a hospital spokeswoman who released the following statement:

The system works by choreographing highly sophisticated systems—imaging, beam delivery and motion management—and makes it possible to deliver treatments quickly while monitoring and compensating for tumor motion. It will enable faster, accurate tumor targeting in the treatment of challenging cancers throughout the body, including those in the brain, spinal cord and lung. The $6 million construction project is expected to be complete with the new TrueBeam system operational in the spring of 2015.

“TrueBeam is a breakthrough technology that enhances our ability to treat cancer and other diseases with noninvasive image-guided radiosurgery,” said Dr. Sanjeev Aggarwal, medical director of Novant Health Cancer Center. “It represents a quantum leap in terms of the spectrum of advanced treatment options we can offer patients fighting serious disease.”

Improving the patient experience
TrueBeam also offers features to improve the patient experience. The machine’s mechanisms run smoothly, quietly and fast. Three closed-circuit television systems and a two-way audio system allow for comprehensive monitoring of the patient from outside the treatment room and facilitate interactions between patient and therapist. Enhanced technology enables music to be played during the short treatments, helping to create a more soothing treatment environment.

Fast, precise treatments
The system can deliver treatments 2.4 to 4 times faster with a dose delivery rate of up to 2,400 monitor units per minute—double the output of most other radiosurgery systems, including CyberKnife. This is important, as independent studies have shown that with faster treatments there is less tumor and patient movement.

“Intelligent” automation further speeds treatments with an up to five-fold reduction in the number of steps needed for imaging, positioning and treating patients compared with earlier Varian technology. A complex radiosurgery that typically takes 30 to 60 minutes can be completed in just 5 to 20 minutes. 

Novant Health Cancer is nationally recognized by the American College of Radiology, and is a vital part of Novant Health’s comprehensive cancer care program. That program includes Novant Health Prince William Medical Center whose cancer care is accredited by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer, and the Novant Health Breast Center, recognized by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers. The collaborative and multidisciplinary clinical care team treat cancers, including bladder; bone; brain; breast; colorectal; esophageal, gynecologic, head and neck; lung; pancreatic, prostate; skin; stomach; and testicular.

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