Covering the Greater Prince William County, Virginia Area

Where did the Easter Bunny come from? Egg hunts on April 8th, 15th in Prince William

Flowers bloom, trees begin to grow their leaves, and animals wake from their slumber in the spring.

One of the more symbolic celebrations during the beginning of the year is Easter. There are traditions and symbols that are associated with the festive day one may not know about, including a fox, a chicken, and of course, the rabbit.

Where did the Easter Bunny come from? The egg giving hare has been associated with Easter for centuries, with some of the first mentions of this furry animal in 16th-century German writings. The Easter Bunny is believed to have imported to the United States by Pennsylvania Dutch settlers.

Known as the Osterhase, he was not the only animal to bring eggs to children on Easter throughout history. In parts of Germany and Switzerland, children also waited for eggs from the Easter Cuckoo, the Easter Rooster, the Easter Stork, the Easter Fox, and the Easter Chick.

Besides coloring eggs for the celebration, other traditions, such as the egg tree, also found their way to American though the German settlers who arrived in the Pennsylvania Dutch country during the 1700s.

Furthermore, gift giving has become a part of the Spring celebration, with the giving of candy or baskets full of candy. Easter is the second best-selling candy holiday in America, with chocolate Easter Bunnies — solid or hallow — usually as the main attraction.

The confectionary animal wonders began appearing in Easter celebrations the early 20th century due to advances in chocolate molding techniques.

On Saturday, April 8, Ben Lomond Historic Site, along with their friends at the Pat White Center, are hosting its annual Eggstravaganza from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Egg Hunts will be at 11:30 am, 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., and 2:30 p.m. at the historic site and each hunt will be separated by age groups.

Try your skills at a historic egg roll as well as enjoying fun kid-friendly games and crafts at Pat White Center at Ben Lomond. Guest are encouraged to bring their own basket for egg collecting. Tours of the Civil War Hospital will be available.

Please purchase tickets at Pat White Center at Ben Lomond. Admission is $5 per person, with children 2 and under free. Ben Lomond Historic Site is located at 10321 Sudley Manor Dr., in Manassas. 703-367-7872.

On Saturday, April 15, Rippon Lodge Historic Site host its annual Easter Egg Hunt from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Egg hunts are at 11:30 a.m.., 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., and 2:30 p.m. on the lawn and each hunt will be separated into age groups.

Along with the search for colorful eggs, crafts, lawn games, and tours of the historic house make this a day the whole family may enjoy. Guest are encouraged to bring their own baskets for egg collecting, and a picnic lunch.

House tours will be available on the hour. Admission is $5 per Child, $2 per Adult; and children two and under free. Rippon Lodge Historic Site is located at 15520 Blackburn Road in Woodbridge. 703-499-9812.

Full of delightful activities the whole family may enjoy, don’t miss out on these two popular events. Come and celebrate Easter this spring with Historic Preservation in April!

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